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Annual survey of PC and Mac-based library system vendors

Library Systems Newsletter [May 1998]


Each year Library Systems Newsletter surveys the library automation industry to get an overview of the market and to facilitate comparison among vendors. The March-April issue described the vendors of library automation products which use UNIX and other multi-user operating systems. This issue is devoted to the vendors of PC- and Mac-based multi-function products-those using the DOS, Windows95 or NT, or Macintosh operating systems to support at least three modules, including either circulation or patron access catalog. Not included are vendors which offer only a single-module, such as acquisitions, serials control, or cataloging; or two modules such as cataloging or a union database and interlibrary loan.

While some of the products developed for the DOS and Windows operating systems are now available under Windows NT, the vast majority of the sales have continued to be for DOS and Windows 95. However, Library. Solution by TLC (The Library Corporation) is available as a Windows NT product only. It is included in this report, but it should have been included with the multi-user systems and will be next year. Despite its choice of operating system, TLC competes more often with Ameritech, Gaylord, and Sirsi (which have recently added NT as an alternative operating system environment), than it does with CASPR, Follett, and Winnebago.

While several vendors included here offer only software packages, this report also identifies vendors which claim to sell turnkey systems. While our definition of "turnkey's includes provision of hardware, software, installation, training, and ongoing support from a single source; it is clear that many vendors of PC- and Mac-based products do not regard installation and onsite training as part of the definition, because the cost of such services might put the products out of reach of many libraries. We have, therefore, decided to call the more limited scope of offering both hardware and software, without installation and on-site training, "bundled' products.

Unlike the multi-user library systems market detailed in the March/April issue, many vendors of PC- and Mac-based integrated, multi-function systems do not offer a wide range of functionality. While circulation and patron access catalog modules are offered by nearly all PC- and Mac-based system vendors, a minority offer acquisitions and serials control, and few offer more than five modules. In contrast, the multi-user systems discussed in the March-April issue support 10 to 14 modules each. The vendors covered in this report also focus far more on the school and special library markets than do the vendors covered in the March-April issue.

This survey uses the same methodology employed in the past. Vendors were contacted by fax and mail, with follow-up by fax and telephone as necessary. Our queries focused on whether the product was available as a bundled product, software only, or both; the hardware platform, operating system, and programming language; the number of sales (contracts, not the number of packages) during the past calendar year; the total number of installations; types of libraries served; the percentage of customers using each module or major function; corporate revenues and profitability.

Also included are the number of staff devoted to software maintenance and development, sales and marketing, and other customer support followed by major enhancements as reported by the vendors.

SUMMARY

The survey was limited to North American vendors. The number of vendors was reduced from a year earlier as the result of CASPR purchasing Columbia Library System from the McGraw-Hill companies and the decision of Chancery Software to replace its Library Pro I product with CASPR's Library World.

While only nine vendors are included in this year's survey, they appear to account for more than 90% of the contracts awarded in 1997-a figure based on the percentage share of the market the vendors have had in previous years when as many as 14 vendors responded.

Of these nine companies, five offer both bundled products and software; the other four offer software only. Because of the large installed base of PCs and Macs in libraries, even the vendors offering bundled products realize most of their revenue from software only sales.

The nine respondents together signed 15,656 contracts in 1997-down only one-tenth of one percent from the previous year. Nearly 65% of the contracts were for networked products. The average network appears to consist of five concurrent users. Total revenue for this industry segment is estimated at $115 million for the year; about the same as the year before.

Follett reported gross sales of $30-$35 million; Winnebago, $25-$30 million; TLC, $10-$l5 million; Nichols, $5-$10 million; CASPR, 1-$2.5 million; and the others declined to disclose sales figures.

Table 1 lists the vendors according to the total number of contracts signed in 1997. Table 2 shows the total number of customers installed and currently supported. Table 3 shows the number of staff devoted to software maintenance and development, Table 4, the number of staff devoted to sales and marketing, Table 5, the number of staff devoted to other customer service. Table 6 ranks the vendors-by the ratio of staff to total installations.


Table 1. Number of Contracts Signed During 1997
Vendor Total Contracts Signed in 1997
Follett 7,479
Winnebago 5,083
Nichols 1,254
CASPR 1,000
EOS International 517
SIRS 200
Brodart 63
TLC 59
Ringgold 1


Table 2. Total Number of Customers Installed and Currently Supported
VendorTotal Customers
Winnebago 34,000 (est.)
Follett 28,000
CASPR 8,500
EOS International 5,231
Nichols 4,586
SIRS 1,738
Brodart 363
TLC 45
Ringgold 12 (est.)


Table 3. Staff Devoted to Software Maintenance and Development
VendorTotal Staff -Software Maint. / Dev.
Winnebago 50
Follett 44
EOS International 33
TLC 22
Nichols 14
Brodart 14
SIRS 10
CASPR 10
Ringgold 1


Table 4. Staff Devoted to Sales and Marketing
Vendor Total Staff
Sales and Marketing
EOS International 90
Winnebago 75
Follett 70
Nichols 39
Brodart 19
SIRS 15
TLC 14
CASPR 5
Ringgold 0.5


Table 5. Staff Devoted to Customer Support
Vendor Total Staff -
Customer Support
Follett 88
EOS International 56
Winnebago 50
TLC 24
Brodart 20
Nichols 15
SIRS 15
CASPR 10
Ringgold 0.5


Table 6. Ratio of Customer Support Staff to the Number of Customers
Vendor Ratio of Support Staff:Customers
TLC 1:2
Brodart 1:18
Ringgold 1:24
EOS International 1:93
SIRS 1:116
Nichols 1:306
Follett 1:318
Winnebago 1:680
CASPR 1:850

VENDOR REPORTS

The vendor reports are arranged alphabetically and are based on information furnished by the respondents.

Brodart Automation offers two products which meet the criteria of the survey: Precision One Integrated System and Media Minder. The company sells both bundled and software only, but it recommends that hardware be purchased locally. Toll-free customer service is provided. Enhancements are released as necessary, usually twice per year for Precision One Integrated System and once per year for Precision One Media Minder.

Precision One Integrated System runs on IBM PC-compatibles with MS-DOS 5.0 or higher as the operating system. A Windows NT version is in development. The DBMS is proprietary and the programming languages are C, C++, and Assembly. It is available in both a standalone and LAN version; the LAN version has no maximum number of concurrent users. The maximum bibliographic record database is 4 GB; the maximum bibliographic record is 20 Kb. The system is capable of taking in, editing, retaining, and outputting full-MARC bibliographic records. There were 39 contracts signed during 1997. While the total number of customers was not reported, by adding the 39 new contracts to the 80 reported last year brings the total to 119, approximately two-thirds standalone systems. Some 60% of the customers are public libraries, 38% are school, and 1% each are academic and special libraries. All of the sites were using local cataloging, OPAC, and interlibrary loan; 90% each circulation and inventorying. A CD-ROM interface was at all sites; 90% each had a LAN interface and a Precision One Cataloging System interface; and 10% each had OCLC and BiblioFile interfaces. The company had nine staff committed to software development and maintenance of the product, 11 to marketing and sales, and 15 to other customer support.

Media Minder also runs on IBM PC-compatibles using DOS 5.0 or higher. Windows95 and Windows NT versions are in development. The DBMS is Btrieve and the programming language is Turbo Pascal. The product is available in a standalone and LAN version; the LAN version has no maximum number of concurrent users or database size. There were 24 contracts signed during 1997, bringing the total number of customers to 205 standalone and 39 networked systems-all in North America. Some 70% were in school libraries, 20% in special, and 10% in academic libraries. All sites were using the patron access catalog, authority control, local cataloging, inventorying, materials booking, and the report generator modules; and all sites were using a LAN interface. There were five staff committed to software development and maintenance, eight to marketing and sales, and five to other customer support. The major software enhancement in 1997 was access from the Internet.

The company declined to provide information on gross sales or profitability. Of f ices are maintained in Williamsport (PA) and Brantford (Ontario, Canada).

[Brodart Automation, 500 Arch Street, Williamsport, PA 17705; (800) 233-8467 ext. 640; fax (717) 327-9237; E-mail: salesmkt@brodart.com; Web: www.brodart.com.]

CASPR Library Systems, Inc. offers LibraryWorks and LibraryWorld as software-only products which run on Macintosh or IBM or compatible PCs using Macintosh OS or Windows 3.1, Windows95, and Windows NT. While the two products are very similar, the latter makes extensive use of graphical user interfaces (GUIs). The DBMS used is The MARC Database Engine (MDE), and the programming languages are C and C++-in both standalone and LAN versions. For the LAN versions, the number of concurrent users is limited only by the size and speed of the network used; the maximum database size is 8 million catalog records and 8 million patron records. The systems are capable of taking in, retaining, and outputting full-MARC bibliographic records. Two major enhancement releases are made each year.

The company reported a total of 1,000 signed contracts for the two products in 1997, bringing its customer base to nearly 3,500. Its total customer base grew further to more than 8,500 as the result of adding some 3,000 former Columbia Library System customers and 2,000 Chancery Software customers. The former was the result of a purchase of the Columbia Library System product from the McGraw-Hill companies; the latter the result of a licensing agreement with Chancery which replaced that company's Library Pro 1 with CASPR's LibraryWorks at 2,000 school libraries. The total customer base at the end of 1997 consisted of 90% school libraries, 7% special, 2% academic, and 1% public libraries.

All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, circulation, patron access catalog, interlibrary loan, report generator, journal citation files, inventory control, GUI OPAC, and GUI Technical Services. Twenty percent had a Web OPAC. All sites were capable of utilizing OCLC, RLIN, UTLAS, WLN, BiblioFile, CD-ROM, and LAN interfaces. Acquisitions and serials control were used by approximately -30% of the sites each.

Gross sales were between $1 and $2.5 million with an after-tax profit. At the end of 1997, the company had .10 staff committed to software maintenance and development 5 to marketing and sales, and 10 to customer support.

[CASPR, Inc., 100 Park Center Plaza, Suite 500, San Jose, CA 95113; (800) 852-2777 or (408) 882-0600; fax (408) 882-0608; Web: www.caspr.com.]

EOS International offers Graphical Library Automation System (GLAS), Manager Series, and T Series as both bundled and software only products for PCs. The first two products were formerly marketed by Data Trek, one of two companies which merged to form EOS International. The third was formerly known as the Information Navigator in the U.S. and TINLIB in the rest of the world. It was developed by IME, the other company which was absorbed into the new EOS International. Major upgrade releases for all of the products are made every 12-18 months and are free to clients with an active software support subscription. Minor updates are released "as needed" and are free to all clients. The company provides toll-free customer support.

GLAS runs on Windows 3.1 or higher, Windows95, and Windows NT. It is available in standalone and LAN versions. It uses Visual Objects programming language. The maximum database size for bibliographic records is 250,000, 250,000 item records, and 250,000 patron records. The system is capable of taking in, editing, retaining, and outputting full-MARC bibliographic records. There were 285 contracts signed during 1997, bringing the total number of customers to 957. No breakdown of standalone and networked systems was provided, but in past years the company reported it was about 50% each. Some 85% of the customers are special libraries, 7% are academic, 5% are school, and 3% are public libraries. Some 27% of the sites were using acquisitions; 66%, serials control; 27% local cataloging; 49% circulation; 32% GUI patron access catalog. Less than 1% had the report generator. Some 36% of the sites had the capability to use OCLC, RLIN, WLN, BiblioFile, and UTLAS interfaces. The major software enhancement in 1997 was full-MARC conformity.

Manager Series runs under MS-DOS and Windows. It uses dBase IV as the DBMS, and C and Clipper 5.2 as the programming languages. It is available in standalone and network versions. The maximum database size for bibliographic records is 250,000, 250,000 item records, and 250,000 patron records; and the system is capable of taking in and outputting records in full-MARC format, but not storing them. There were 46 contracts signed during 1997, bringing the total number of customers to 2,004. There is no breakdown for standalone and networked units, but in earlier years the company estimated that standalone outnumbered networked units. Some 51% of the customers are special libraries, 35% are school, 8% are academic. About 6% are public libraries. Nearly 82% of the sites were using the local cataloging module; 36% serials control; 24% acquisitions; 67% circulation; and 32% the patron access catalog. Nearly 14% were using report generator and 48% each were able to use OCLC, RLIN, WLN, BiblioFile, and UTLAS interfaces. Software enhancements made in 1997 included year 2000 compliance.

T Series runs on MS-DOS and Windows. However, it runs as an MS-DOS task under Windows. It uses the E-R database management system and the C+ and C++ programming languages. There also is a UNIX version. The DOS and Windows products are available in standalone and LAN versions. The maximum number of concurrent users on the LAN versions is determined by the host network limitations. There is no limit on the number of records in the database. There were 186 contracts signed during 1997, bringing the total number of customers to 2,270-2,187 of them in Europe, 12 in North America, and 71 in Asia/Oceania. Over 63% of the customers are special libraries, 27% academic, 9% public, and 1% school libraries. Acquisitions is used by 34% of customers; serials control by 43%; local cataloging with authority control by 97%; circulation by 69%; OPAC by 91%; inventorying by 2%; the report generator by 3%; and OCLC, RLIN, WLN, and BiblioFile interfaces by 2% each.

Gross sales were not given, but an after-tax profit was realized. The company had 33 staff committed to software maintenance and development for all products, 90 to marketing and sales, and 56 to customer support. Corporate headquarters are located in Carlsbad (CA), European headquarters in London, Asia Pacific headquarters in Singapore, with offices also in Boston, Paris, and 40 other cities.

[EOS International, 5838 Edison Place, Carlsbad, CA 92008-6596; (760) 431-8400 or (800) 876-5484; fax (760) 431-8448; E-mail: sales@eosintl.com; Web: www.eosintl.com.]

Follett Software Company offers three separate products: Circulation Plus, Catalog Plus and Alliance Plus. All are offered either bundled with hardware or as software only products, 95% of sales are software only. A majority of Follett's customers utilize Intel-based PCs, but a significant minority use Macintosh and Apple computers. Follett creates products in the MS-DOS, Windows 95, Windows NT, and Mac OS environments, using the Faircom DBMS, and the C++ programming language. A toll-free number is provided for customer service. Enhancements are released every 12-18 months, as needed. Enhancements are free to customers with current support agreements; fee based for non-support customers. Both standalone and LAN versions are available for all products. The maximum number of concurrent users is dependent only upon Network Operating System (NOS) license agreements; the database size depends upon the hardware. The systems are capable of taking in, editing, retaining, and outputting full-MARC bibliographic records.

The company did not submit a separate survey form for each product, therefore, the data for them had to be combined. It reported a total of 7,479 sales for 1997, including 3,733 sales of Catalog Plus. The total number of customers at the end of 1997 was approximately 28,000, almost all in North America. Over three-fourths of the customers had networked versions. Over 95% of the customers were school libraries, 3% were public libraries, and 1% each were academic and special libraries. All sites were using local cataloging, 98% were using both circulation and inventorying, and 80% were using the patron access catalog. Half (and all Alliance Plus customers) were using a CD-ROM interface.

The company was beta testing its Windows95 and NT products at the end of the year. It also was completing a Web-based product to be called Web Collection Plus.

The company reported gross sales revenues in the $30-$35 million range with an after-tax profit. A staff of 44 was committed to software development and maintenance for all products, 70 to marketing and sales; and 88 to customer support.

[Follett Software Company, 1391 Corporate Drive, McHenry, IL 60050-7041; (815) 344-8700 or (800) 323-3397; fax (815) 344-8774; E-mail: info@fsc. follett.com; Web: www.fsc.follett.com.]

The Library Corporation offers its Library.Solution both bundled and software only. Over 70% of the sales are bundled. The product, which was introduced in 1997, uses Windows NT on any Intel-compatible Pentium processor. The DBMS is Oracle and the programming language is object oriented C++. The patron access client is Web-based. It is available in a LAN or WAN version. While Microsoft claims that the maximum number of concurrent users can be as high as 250, TLC commits to no more than 150. The maximum database size is at least 300,000 bibliographic records- larger ones are possible, but the initial data load is likely to be very time-consuming. The system takes in, retains, and outputs bibliographic records in the full-MARC format. Since the acquisitions and serials control modules are still in development, releases are currently quarterly. Toll-free customer support is available.

In 1997, there were 59 contracts signed; 45 systems had been installed by the end of the year. Forty-four of the sites are in North America, and one is in South America. Some 59% of the customers are academic libraries, 30% are public, 8% are special, and 3% are school libraries. All of the sites have local cataloging, authority control, circulation, inventorying, Web-based patron access catalog, and report generator. All have a Z39.50 client, but none have the available Z39.50 server. Seventy percent have a Web server. Twenty percent each have an OCLC or RLIN interface, and all have a BiblioFile interface.

The firm reported sales in the $10 to $15 million range in 1997, with an after-tax profit. There were 22 staff committed to software maintenance and development, 14 to marketing and sales, and 24 to customer support. The company has offices in Atlanta, Cleveland, and Kansas City in addition to its home office in Inwood, WV.

[The Library Corporation, Research Park, Inwood, WV 25428; (800) 325-7759; fax (304) 229-0295; Web: www.TLCdelivers.com.

Nichols Advanced Technologies, Inc. offers its products, Athena and MOLLI, as software-only. Both systems are available in both standalone and LAN versions. Both systems are capable of taking in, editing, retaining, and outputting full-MARC bibliographic records. Enhancements are released at least yearly; customers currently paying for technical support receive enhancements at no additional charge. A toll-free number is provided for customer support.

Athena runs on PC-based (Intel) microcomputers using Windows 3.x or higher, Macintosh System 7.0 or higher, or DOS as the operating system; an xBase and proprietary DBMS; and C++ and JavaScript as the programming languages. The number of concurrent users supported under the LAN version is based upon network software; the database size is limited only by hard drive space. There were 1,223 units sold in 1997. A total of 573 standalone and 2,692 networked systems were installed and accepted at year's end, almost all in North America. Some 82% of the customers are school libraries, 8.4% are public, 5.3% are special, and 4.3% are academic libraries. All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, circulation, inventorying, GUI-based OPAC, and report generator; 2.3% were using the Web PAC; and 1% each were using acquisitions and serials control. All sites had OCLC, RLIN, UTLAS, WLN, and BiblioFile interfaces. Some 4.2% had a Z39.50 client.

MOLLI runs on PCs using MS-DOS, xBase and a proprietary DBMS, and C and compiled dBase as the programming languages. The number of concurrent users for the LAN version is based upon the network software; the maximum database size is approximately 100,000 records. There were 31 sales during 1997. The total number of installed and accepted units was 1,321 at the end of 1997, including 614 networked systems- almost all in North America. Some 80% of the customers are school libraries, 11% are special, 7% are public, and 2% are academic libraries. All sites were using local cataloging, circulation, inventorying, patron access catalog, and report generator; just over 1% each acquisitions and serials control. All sites had OCLC, RLIN, UTLAS, WLN, and BiblioFile interfaces.

The company's 1997 gross sales revenues were between $5 and $10 million with an after-tax profit. A staff of 14 was committed to software maintenance and development for both products, 39 to marketing and sales, and 15 to customer support. In addition to LaCrosse, Nichols maintains offices in Austin and Edmonton. The primary U.S. sales office is in Austin.

[Nichols Advanced Technologies, Inc., 3452 Losey Blvd. South, LaCrosse, WI 54601; (800) 658-9453 or (608) 787- 8333; fax (608) 787-8337; or 8911 Capital of Texas Highway, Suite 2100, Austin, TX 78759; (512) 342-2850; fax (512) 342-2827; Web: www.nichols-inc.com.]

Ringgold Management Systems, Inc. offers Nonesuch Acquisitions, Nonesuch Catalog Control System, and Nonesuch Circulation as bundled or software-only Windows95/NT-based products. All come as standalone and LAN versions and can be combined into a multi-function system. The maximum number of concurrent users for all three is unlimited by the product. Enhancements are issued annually as part of maintenance support. Toll-free support is not offered.

The company did not break down the data for its products in its report for 1997.

For all of its products, the company's gross sales for 1997 were under $1 million; the company did not provide information on its after-tax profitability. There was 1 software development and maintenance staff member, .5 FTE in marketing and sales, and .5 FTE in customer support.

[Ringgold Management Systems, Inc., Box 368, Beaverton, OR 97075-0368; (503) 645-3502; fax (503) 690-6642; Internet: ralph@ringgold.com.

SIRS, Inc. offers its Mandarin Library Automation System both bundled and software only. Both standalone and LAN-based versions are available. The LAN version has no maximum number of concurrent users. Enhancements, once or twice a year, are available to Annual Service and Update Agreement customers. Toll-free customer service is provided. It runs on IBM-compatible PCs with DOS 5.0+, Windows, Windows NT, and Novell operating systems, uses a proprietary database management system, and is written in C++. The maximum database size is limited only by hard drive constraints. The system is capable of taking in, editing, retaining, and outputting full-MARC bibliographic records.

During 1997, over 200 contracts were signed; 60% software only. The total customer base at the end of 1997 was 1,738-1,700 in North America, 25 in Europe, and 13 in the rest of the world. Over 75% of the libraries are school, 10% each are public and academic, and 5% are special. All of the sites were using local cataloging and patron access catalog; 90% were using circulation, inventorying, and report generator; and 10% were using the community information module. The GUI patron access catalog was in use at 75% of the sites. Only 1% of the libraries had acquisitions and serials control, and Web server.

The company reported gross revenues and profitability as "proprietary." (However, in 1995, it reported gross sales in the $1 to $2.5 million range. Current sales levels probably still fall within that range). The company reported a staff of 10 committed to software development and maintenance, 15 to sales and marketing, and 15 to customer support. Major enhancements in 1997 included the completion of the acquisitions and serials control modules, also the introduction of a Web gateway module,

The company maintains offices in Montreal and Champlain (NY), as well as Boca Raton.

[SIRS, Inc., P.O. Box 2348, Boca Raton, FL 33427; (561) 994-0079 or (800) 232-SIRS; fax (561) 995-4025; Internet: mandarin@sirs.com; Web: www.sirs.com.]

Winnebago Software Company offers CIRC/CAT for MS-DOS, CIRC/CAT for MacOS, and CIRC/CAT Spectrum as software-only for Motorola and Intel-based PCs, and for Mac 68020 and higher platforms. The products are offered in both standalone and LAN versions. The number of concurrent users and database size are virtually unlimited. The systems are capable of taking in, editing, retaining, and outputting full-MARC bibliographic records. Software enhancements are usually released every 12-18 months, and they are free to all customers on support agreements; upgrades from competitors are also available. Toll-free customer service is provided. The total customer base was approximately 34,000 libraries at the end of 1997, however, no breakdown by product was available. For all three products, over 90% of the customers were in North America and between 86% and 95% were school libraries.

CIRC/CAT for MS-DOS uses the MS-DOS 3.11 and later operating systems on any IBM-compatible PC. The DBMS is Btrieve and the programming language is Pascal. The total number of contracts signed in 1997 was 2,126. All sites had acquisitions, local cataloging, circulation, inventorying, OPAC, materials booking, and report generator; and all had a cataloging support system interface.

CIRC/CAT for MacOS is written in C++ for Mac 68020 and higher machines. The DBMS is Faircom. There were 555 contracts signed in 1997. All sites have the local cataloging, circulation, inventorying, GUI-based patron access catalog, report generator, and community information modules; and all have a cataloging support system interface. CIRC/CAT Spectrum is available for Motorola and Intel-based PCs and for Mac 68020 and higher platforms. The operating systems are Windows 3.11, Windows95, Windows NT, and Mac OS. The DBMS is Faircom and the programming language is C++. There were 2,404 new contracts in 1997. All of the sites had local cataloging, circulation, GUI-based patron access catalog, community information, and report generator; and all had a cataloging support system interface.

The company reported gross revenues of $25-$30 million and an after-tax profit. A staff of 70 was committed to software maintenance and development for all three products, 96 to marketing and sales, and 28 to customer support.

[Winnebago Software Company, 457 East South Street, Caledonia, MN 55921; (507) 724-5411 or (800) 654-3002; fax (507) 724-2301; E-mail: sales@winnebago.com; Web: www.winnebago.com.]

Permalink:
View Citation
Publication Year:1998
Type of Material:Article
Language English
Published in: Library Systems Newsletter
Publication Info:Volume 18 Number 05
Issue:May 1998
Page(s):33-40
Publisher:American Library Association
Place of Publication:Chicago, IL
Notes:Howard S. White, Editor-in-Chief; Richard W. Boss, Contributing Editor
Company: Brodart, Inc.
SIRS Mandarin, Inc.
Caspr, Inc.
EOS International
Follett Software Company
The Library Corporation
Nichols Advanced Technologies Inc.
Ringgold Management Systems, Inc.
SIRS, Inc.
Winnebago Software Company
Mandarin Library Automation
Products: Precision One Integrated System
Media Minder
LibraryWorld
GLAS
Manager Series
T Series
Circulation Plus
Catalog Plus
Alliance Plus
Library.Solution
Athena
MOLLI
Nonesuch Catalog Control System
Mandarin
CIRC/CAT
Subject: Library automation systems -- directories
ISSN:0277-0288
Record Number:5985
Last Update:2021-11-17 12:27:41
Date Created:0000-00-00 00:00:00