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LS/2000: questions and answers

Press Release: OCLC [March 1, 1984]

Copyright (c) 1984 OCLC

Abstract: LS/2000 is an integrated library system that provides bibliographic file maintenance, authority control, circulation control, a sophisticated online public access catalog, and other automated services for both library staff and patrons. The system is available on both minió and microcomputer hardware. LS/2000 is an enhanced version of the Integrated Library System (ILS) developed at the National Library of Medicine and is a product of a joint development effort between OCLC and Online Computer Systems, Inc. Efforts are successfully under way to incorporate enhancements previously developed by AVATAR (a library automation company acquired last year by OCLC). This integration will be completed by July 1984.


1. What is LS/2000

LS/2000 is an integrated library system that provides bibliographic file maintenance, authority control, circulation control, a sophisticated online public access catalog, and other automated services for both library staff and patrons. The system is available on both minió and microcomputer hardware. LS/2000 is an enhanced version of the Integrated Library System (ILS) developed at the National Library of Medicine and is a product of a joint development effort between OCLC and Online Computer Systems, Inc. Efforts are successfully under way to incorporate enhancements previously developed by AVATAR (a library automation company acquired last year by OCLC). This integration will be completed by July 1984.

2. Where is LS/2000 installed?

Hampshire College became the first operational LS/2000 site in November 1983; the OCLC Library became fully operational in February 1984. The other Dublin Cluster Evaluation participants (Ohio Wesleyan University and the University of Akron) will become operational in 1984. An ongoing development project with the Five Colleges, Inc. (Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith College, and the University of Massachusetts) is also being implemented with Hampshire migrating to that system in 1984. Other users include: Allentown Public Library, Carnegie-Mellon University, Glendale Medical Center Library, Houston Academy of Medicine, New Hampshire State Library, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Geological Survey, Mitre Corporation, Library of Congress National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Planning Research Corporation, GTE Telenet Communications Corporation, National Gallery of Art Library, Library of Congress Loan Division, National Gallery of Art Photographic Archives, and Patent and Trademark Office. LS/2000 will be installed at University of Newcastle upon Tyne in the United Kingdom and the University of Kentucky by mid-1984. Several other libraries are in the final stages of contract negotiation.

3. May non-OCLC members purchase the system?

Yes. System installations are not limited to OCLC-member institutions.

4.What is the effect of the AVATAR acquisition?

OCLC's acquisition of AVATAR last year brought proven technology, key personnel, and market position to OCLC in the local systems area. The AVATAR staff is now part of OCLC as an OCLC-Washington office and plays a key role in supporting current and future LS/2000 installations and in developing enhancements to Local Systems products.

5. What kind of implementation support does OCLC provide to libraries for LS/2000?

Staff from OCLC's Library Services Department work with the library staff to ensure that LS/2000 is implemented in the manner most effective for that library. Prior to contract execution, OCLC appoints a Project Manager for the library. Library staff may contact the Project Manager at any time with questions about their LS/2000 system. miring implementation, OCLC assists the library to identify, describe, and define existing and new library policies and procedures, and translates them into the many system parameter. available in LS/2000. Installation Specialists conduct site surveys, assist in site preparation, and install the LS/2000 equipment. Training consists of both Operations and functional system training. OCLC provides extensive profiling support, training, and user documentation.

6. What kinds of hardware does LS/2000 use?

OCLC supports LS/2000 on a wide range of 16-bit and 32-bit Data General hardware, which ha. been determined to be the best hardware available in term. of price and performance. Also, LS/2000 is available on a microcomputer system for much smaller applications at significant cost savings for the library. Libraries have several options in choosing terminals to meet their individual need.. The Lear-Siegler ADM 11., ADM 12, and ADM 23 terminal, with ALA character set options ate available a. veil as the Direct 831 terminal. A printer port interface from the OCLC 100 and 105 terminals to the LS/2000 computer permits libraries to transfer record. cataloged on the OCLC central system to the LS/2000 system. The printer port interface will be available for the OCLC M300 Workstation in early 1984.

7. What is provided in the maintenance agreement?

A library is offered different service levels, depending on needs. Maintenance options include first call, remedial, preventive, and swap-out service. Software maintenance is effectively a 24-hour service. No matter what the problem, the library needs to contact only one person. Hardware and software problems are reported to the Project Manager.

8. Is 24-hour telephone assistance available?

Yes. Library staff may contact their Project Manager with questions about any aspect of their local system. The Quality Control Center, consisting of Library Analysts and support staff, provides back-up to the Project Manager. These staff will analyze the problem and provide necessary assistance. OCLC provides a 24-hour WATS number for this purpose.

9. What is the cost of the system?

LS/2000 is priced very competitively. Since library requirements vary considerably, it is necessary to configure and price the system for each library. Sample configurations for individual libraries are available on request from the Marketing and Sales Department, Local Systems Division, OCLC.

10. How will OCLC aid in database creation?

The Project Manager will review the library's database creation options with the library staff. OCLC can provide support for Retrospective Conversion and AACR2 processing. Bibliographic records in the MARC format can be loaded directly into LS/2000. OCLC can provide custom software to convert non-MARC records into the MARC format. OCLC also customizes the software to create copy specific information as needed for each user.

11. What arrangements are there for user training and documentation?

OCLC and/or participating Networks provide extensive on-site, training. Additionally, a documentation package and an online training database ate provided for ongoing training.

12. Will Acquisitions and Serials Control capabilities be available?

Yes. LS/2000 will include an Acquisitions Subsystem to allow users to maintain an online vendor file, create single-title, multiple-title, and cumulative orders online, calculate discounts, and issue claims. The Acquisitions Subsystem viii include fund accounting. The Serials Control Subsystem will feature next-issue prediction for check in, routing list and inventory control capabilities, and the automated production of claims. OCLC will provide links to the functions of the OCLC central system to support these, and other, local system functions. Acquisitions and Serials Control Subsystems will be available in 1985.

13. How is authority control handled on LS/2000?

During initial system profiling, your library decides which MARC fields to include in its authority-controlled indexes. Authority records may be added and edited as changes in the source authority occur. Two authority records may also be merged into one, and cross references can be created. A change in an authority heading automatically changes bibliographic records with that heading. The system does not use authority record. from external sources (such as LC authority tapes). LS/2000 authority files are created dynamically from incoming bibliographic records.

14. Is timesharing available?

Yes. OCLC currently offers and support. timesharing on the Dublin Cluster to the evaluating libraries as well as a Washington-based timesharing cluster with eight participants. Timesharing cluster, will be added in other geographic areas a. the demand arises. This option is available to smaller libraries who can be served best through a timesharing environment. Timesharing users include Hampshire College, the OCLC Library, Ohio Wesleyan University, Mitt. Corporation, Library of Congress National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped, Planning Research Corporation, GTE Telenet Communications Corporation, National Gallery of Art Library, Library of Congress Loan Division, National Gallery of Art Photographic Archives, and Patent and Trademark Office.

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Publication Year:1984
Type of Material:Press Release
Language English
Issue:March 1, 1984
Publisher:OCLC
Place of Publication:Dublin, OH
Company: OCLC
Products: LS/2000
Libraries: Hampshire College
Ohio Wesleyan University
University of Akron
Amherst College
Hampshire College
Mount Holyoke College
Smith College
University of Massachusetts
Allentown Public Library
Carnegie Mellon University
Glendale Medical Center
Houston Academy of Medicine
New Hampshire State Library
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
U.S. Geological Survey
Mitre Corporation
Library of Congress National Library -- Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped
Planning Research Corporation
National Gallery of Art
Library of Congress -- Loan Division
Patent and Trademark Office
University of Newcastle upon Tyne
University of Kentucky
Record Number:8271
Last Update:2012-12-29 14:06:47
Date Created:0000-00-00 00:00:00