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OCLC Research and ALISE name recipients of 2010 Library and Information Science Research Grants

Press Release: OCLC [February 25, 2010]

Copyright (c) 2010 OCLC

Abstract: OCLC Research and the Association for Library and Information Science Education have awarded 2010 Library and Information Science Research Grants to Louise Spiteri of Dalhousie University and Laurel Tarulli of Halifax Public Libraries; Hsin-liang Chen and Barbara Albee of Indiana University; and Besiki Stvilia and Corinne Jörgensen of Florida State University. The awards were presented in January during the ALISE 2010 Annual Conference Awards Reception in Boston, Massachusetts.


DUBLIN, Ohio, USA, 25 February 2010. OCLC Research and the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE) have awarded 2010 Library and Information Science Research Grants to Louise Spiteri of Dalhousie University and Laurel Tarulli of Halifax Public Libraries; Hsin-liang Chen and Barbara Albee of Indiana University; and Besiki Stvilia and Corinne Jörgensen of Florida State University. The awards were presented in January during the ALISE 2010 Annual Conference Awards Reception in Boston, Massachusetts.

Louise Spiteri, Ph.D. of the School of Information Management at Dalhousie University and Laurel Tarulli of Halifax Public Libraries will conduct research to examine and compare how library users access, use, and interact with two social discovery systems used in two Canadian public library systems. The objective of the study, "The Public Library Catalogue as a Social Space: Usability Studies of User Interaction with Social Discovery Systems," is to provide important insight into the design or modification of social discovery tools to ensure they provide the best user experience.

Hsin-liang Chen, Ph.D. and Barbara Albee, of the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University, will examine the implementation of an open source library automation system (Evergreen) in Indiana public libraries and its impact on library users in the project, "Impact of Open Source Library Automation System on Public Library Users." The expected significant outcomes of this project are to identify: benefits library users receive from the implementation of the open source library automation system, library users’ interests in using the OPAC to discover shared library collections, and whether the consortia library collections gain more usage by library users due to the implementation of the open source library automation system.

Besiki Stvilia and Corinne Jörgensen, of the School of Library and Information Studies at Florida State University, will evaluate the utility of end-user generated tagging vocabularies (folksonomies) in maintaining and enhancing the quality of traditional knowledge organization systems as sources of new terms, emerging concepts and relationships. The objectives of the study, "Assessing the Reuse Value of Socially Created Metadata for Image Indexing," are to evaluate the value of Flickr and Wikipedia metadata in generating useful terms and relationships for extending traditional controlled vocabularies.

OCLC/ALISE Library and Information Science Research Grants support research that advances librarianship and information science, promotes independent research to help librarians integrate new technologies into areas of traditional competence, and contributes to a better understanding of the library environment. Full-time academic faculty (or the equivalent) in schools of library and information science worldwide are eligible to apply for grants of up to $15,000. Proposals are evaluated by a panel selected by OCLC and ALISE. Supported projects are expected to be conducted within approximately one year from the date of the award and, as a condition of the grant, researchers must furnish a final project report at the end of the grant period.

More information about the OCLC/ALISE Library and Information Science Research Grant Program can be found at www.oclc.org/research/grants/. A list of previous grant recipients is at www.oclc.org/research/grants/awarded.htm.

About ALISE

ALISE (Association for Library and Information Science Education) is a non-profit organization that serves as the intellectual home of university faculty in graduate programs in library and information science in North America. Its mission is to promote excellence in research, teaching, and service and to provide an understanding of the values and ethos of library and information science. ALISE serves 500 individual members and more than 60 institutional members, primarily in the United States and Canada. For more information, visit www.alise.org.

About OCLC

Founded in 1967, OCLC is a nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world’s information and reducing library costs. More than 72,000 libraries in 112 countries have used OCLC services to locate, acquire, catalog, lend, preserve and manage library materials. Researchers, students, faculty, scholars, professional librarians and other information seekers use OCLC services to obtain bibliographic, abstract and full-text information when and where they need it. OCLC and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the world’s largest online database for discovery of library resources. Search WorldCat.org on the Web. For more information, visit the OCLC Web site.

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Publication Year:2010
Type of Material:Press Release
Language English
Issue:February 25, 2010
Publisher:OCLC
Company: OCLC
Record Number:14546
Last Update:2012-12-29 14:06:47
Date Created:2010-02-26 14:48:49