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Annual survey of PC- and Mac-based library system vendors

Library Systems Newsletter [May 1994]

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Each year LSN surveys the library automation industry to get an overview of the market and to facilitate comparison among vendors. This issue is devoted to the vendors of PC- and Mac-based systems (systems using DOS and Macintosh operating systems). While most vendors included herein offer only software packages, this report also includes vendors of turnkey systems.

This survey uses the same methodology employed in previous years. Vendors were contacted by mail, with follow-up by telephone and fax as necessary. Fifteen vendors responded, including two which offer functionally identical multi-user and PC-based systems. One of the two companies, Data Trek, is included in this issue because the company's focus is PC-based systems. The other, IME, had nearly one-third of its sales and half of its revenues from multi-user systems, therefore it was included in the March-April 1994 combined issue. Of the 14 vendors detailed herein, five offer both turnkey systems and software packages, and nine offer software only. Because of the proliferation of PCs in libraries today, vendors offering turnkey solutions in fact sell turnkey systems much less frequently than they sell software packages for use on existing computers.

The 14 respondents sold a combined 10,760 systems (5,916 new name sales—sales to organizations not previously customers) in 1993. Although there are at least another 14 vendors of microcomputer-based systems operating in North America, we estimate that these 14 represent about 90% of all North American sales of PC-based library applications software. A year ago, 18 respondents had sold 10,417 systems--5,452 of which were new name sales.

Follett was the only vendor to have reported gross sales of $15-$20 million. ISM and Winnebago's sales were $10-$15 million each. Auto-Graphics, Data Trek, and VTLS each reported gross sales of $5-$10 million. Chancery Software declined to provide sales data, but in 1992, it reported sales of between $5 and $10 million. CASPR, Columbia Library System/McGraw-Hill, and Nichols Advanced Technologies each reported sales of $1-$2.5 million. Library Technologies, Inc. reported sales of less than $1 million. INLEX sold its product, The Assistant, in the Fall of 1993 to Data Trek. Data Trek did not provide data for that product. Brodart and On Point declined to provide financial information.

Table 1 is a subset of vendors that have reported more than 50 sales in 1993, ranked according to the number of sales. In some cases, this number is identical to the “new name” figure; in others the two figures are quite different. Table 2 is a ranking by total number of installed and accepted systems, of the vendors reporting at least 900 installations to date. (All others reported fewer than 400 each.)


Table 1. Vendors With More Than 50 System Sales in 1993
VendorTotal Sales“New Name”
Follett4,6863,074
Winnebago3,257557
Inmagic8000
Columbia/McGraw-Hill600600
Data Trek380380
Nichols355355
CASPR298298
Chancery Software250210


Table 2.Vendors With Over 900 installations at the End of 1993
VendorTotal Installed Systems
Follett21,300
Winnebago16,480
Inmagic6,200
Chancery Software2,569
Columbia/McGraw-Hill2,480
Data Trek2,438
Nichols1,502
CASPR1,086
ISM911

VENDOR REPORTS

The 14 vendor reports are arranged alphabetically and are based on information furnished by the vendors. Libraries seeking detailed information with evaluations based upon “test drives” of the software should consult the March-April 1993 and May-June 1993 issues of Library Technology Reports, “Microcomputer-Based Automated Library Systems: New Series, Parts 1 and 2” by Joseph Matthews and Mark Parker.

Auto-Graphics, Inc. offers both turnkey systems and software packages. Its four software packages are: AGILE III, an online cataloging and inter-library loan (ILL) utility; GDCS (Government Document Catalog Service); IMPACT for CD-ROM, patron access catalog, cataloging, and ILL; and SLiMS (Small Library Management System). The software requires at least IBM-compatible 286 hardware, but 386 or higher is recommended. The programming language is higher “C.” AGILE III's customers are 90% public libraries and 10% academic; GDCS's installations are 34% public, 57% academic, and 8.5% special; IMPACT's customers are 77% public, 12% academic, 4% special, and 7% school; and SLiMS's installations are 20% public and 40% for both special and school libraries. The company sold three new systems in 1993. The installed base for the four packages is 362 systems--all but three of them are in North America. The company reported gross sales of $5-$10 million, and an after-tax profit. All sites were using online patron access catalog, authority control, and OCLC interface (also all AGILE Ill-only sites were using remote database searching); up to 25% were using interlibrary loan; 100% of the AGILE III and SLiMS sites were using local cataloging, up to 50% of other sites; and up to 25% had community information. up to 75% of the sites had interfaces with other systems of the same vendor, and 25% had local area network interfaces; and 25% of the AGILE III systems had an Internet interface. Two sites had 400+ devices; six had 200-399; 16 had 100-199; two had 60-99; three had 30-59; three had 16-29; 10 had 8-15; 10 had 2-7 devices, and 258 had one device. A staff of 16 was committed to software maintenance and development, 17 to sales/marketing, and 15 to customer service. The 1993 major enhancements were: Internet access added to AGILE III, automatic alert and very detailed depository information for GDCS users; completion of major upgrade to IMPACT SERVER/ILL and memory management improved to allow larger and faster searches; and a special inventory module for SLiMS and display of diacritics and special characters to screen. The company has offices in Pomona, Sacramento, Parker (CO), Springfield (NJ), Niantic (CT); and Phoenix (MD).

[Auto-Graphics, Inc., 3201 Temple Avenue, Pomonp, CA 91768; (800) 776-6739; fax (714) 595-3506.]

Brodart Automation's product, Precision One Integrated System, is PC-based using MS-DOS, supplied as both turnkey systems and software only. The programming languages are C, C++, and Assembly. There are 32 installed and accepted systems, all in North America, half in public and half in school libraries. Ten percent of the 32 systems sold in 1993 were new name sales. All sites were using online patron access catalog, local cataloging, and report generator; 75% were using authority control and circulation, 80% had LAN interfaces, and 50% were capable of interfacing with other systems from the same vendor. Ten percent of the sites are interfaced with BiblioFile and 5% with OCLC. Twenty-five sites were supporting 8-15 devices.

Brodart/CRS, Inc.'s (formerly Canopy Road Software) product, Media Minder, is offered either as a turnkey system or as software-only for PCs using DOS. The programming languages are Btrieve and PASCAL. The company sold 10 systems in 1993, all to new customers. The installed base is 218 systems, all in North America (5% each in special and public libraries, 70% in school libraries, and 20% in academic libraries). All sites were using OPAC, authority control, local cataloging, circulation and, report generator; 50% had LAN interfaces. One hundred sites were supporting 2-7 devices. The company declined to report gross sales or profitability for 1993. A staff of 15 was committed to software maintenance and development, 16 to sales and marketing, and 18 to customer service.

[Brodart/CRS, Inc., P.O. Box 3728, Wiliamsport PA 17701; (800) 233-8467, ext. 640; fax (717) 327-9237.]

CASPR, Inc. offers software-only systems, LibraryWorks and Library-Browser, for Macintosh, IBM XT, AT and compatibles, PS/2 with Windows, Apple lie and Apple GS hardware. The operating systems are Macintosh 6.04+, MS-DOS 5.0+, and Windows 3.0+. The programming language is C/C++. The vendor reported 298 new name systems sales in 1993, bringing its total of installed and accepted systems in North America to 1,086 (78.5% in school libraries, 16.8% special, 3.8% academic, and .9% public libraries). The company reported gross sales figures of between $1 and $2.5 million, and an after-tax profit. All Bites were using acquisitions, local cataloging, authority control, circulation, serials control, OPAC, ILL, materials booking, journal citation files, and inventory control. The capability exists in the software for all sites to utilize OCLC, RLIN, Utlas, WLN, BiblioFile, LaserCat, and LAN interfaces, as well as OSI interfaces to other systems and interfaces with other systems from the same vendor-utilization of these capabilities by customers is unknown. Any MARC records can be imported and exported. The company estimated that 86 sites were supporting 16-29 devices, 100 had 8-15, 800 had 2-7, and 100 sites had one device. Three staff were devoted to software maintenance and development at the end of 1993, four to sales and marketing, and three to customer support. Major enhancements in 1993 included the ability of multi-media digital information to be attached to a MARC record, stored and viewed; CD-ROM capability; new graphic user interface; and complete cross-platform integration for management and searching.

[CASPR, Inc., 635 Vaqueros Avenue, Sunnyvale, CA 94086; (800) 852-2777 or (408) 522-9800; fax (408) 522-9806.]

Chancery Software, Ltd. offers a software-only product, MacSchool Library, for Macintosh hardware with the Mac OS, written in PASCAL. The company reported 250 sales in 1993 with 210 of those new name—99.9% of its new name sales were to school libraries. The company reported that 2,569 systems were installed and accepted in 1993—2,498 in North America. The company did not report gross sales figures or profitability for 1993, in 1992, gross sales were reported as $5-$10 million, with an after-tax profit. The company declined to report for 1993 on module information; however in 1992, although no percentages were given, it was indicated that at least some sites were using local cataloging, circulation, OPAC, materials booking, report generator, and inventorying modules; and BiblioFile and LAN interfaces were also in use. The company also declined to report for 1993 on site sizes but in 1992, it reported that all sites supported 8-15 devices. A staff of four is assigned to software maintenance and development, 22 to sales and marketing, and six to customer support. The company reported a complete product rewrite in 1993, for release in 1994. Offices are maintained in Burnaby (BC) and Bellingham (WA).

[Chancery Software Ltd., 450 -4170 Still Creek Drive, Burnaby, British Columbia V5C 6C6 Canada; (604) 294-1233; fax <604) 294-2225.]

Columbia Library System/McGraw-Hill sells software packages for IBM or compatible PCs using 286, 386, 486 or compatibles, and it runs on Novell NetWare, allowing multiple users. The operating system is MS-DOS 3.3+, the Ocelet database, and C programming language. The company reported sales of 600 packages in 1993, all new name sales. The total number of installations at the end of 1993 was 2,480—2,400 in North America, consisting of 80% school libraries, 5% academic, 10% public, and 5% special libraries. Revenues were between $1 and $2.5 million with an after-tax profit. All of the sites had a report generator module; 95% each were using local cataloging, authority control, OPAC, inventory, and circulation. Ten percent had serials control; and 3% had remote database searching. Some 99% were using the MARC Record Interface module, which includes the OCLC interface, RLIN interface, Ut].as interface, WLN interface, BiblioFile interface, or LaserCat interface; and 60% can interface to other systems from the same vendor. A LAN interface is used in 70% of the sites. Three sites had 200-399 devices; five had 100-199 devices; 12 had 60-99 devices; 180 had 30-60; 250 had 16-29; 400 had 8-15; 900 had 2-7; and, 720 had only one device. The company has 14 staff devoted to software maintenance and development, 16 sales staff (for all products), two marketing staff, and nine (not including trainers) devoted to customer support. The company listed major enhancements for 1993 as new circulation initialization/parameters module; search list (call number sort) in the OPAC, and many new reports. In addition to the home office in Monterey, the company maintains offices in Denver and Vancouver.

[McGraw-Hill School Systems, Columbia Library System, 20 Ryan Ranch, Monterey, CA 93940-9703; (800) 663-0544; (408) 393-7731; fax (408) 393-7462.)

Data Trek, Inc. offers both turnkey systems and software-only for PCs (Professional Series 1.1, Manager Series 6.2, and School Series). The products are written for both PC-based (DOS) and multi-user (Digital VMS operating system), but PC-based systems predominate. All of the software supports single-user and network versions. Both systems run on DOS, as well as IBM and compatible computers, Novell 2.OA and higher, Banyan Version 4.x and higher, and LANtastic networks. The programming languages are: C with vBase for Professional Series 1.1, and dBase III and Clipper for Manager Series 6.2 and School Series. The company sold 70 Professional Series 1.1 systems (all new name sales); 242 Manager Series 6.2 for PC-based (all new name sales); and, 68 School Series systems (all new name sales). The installed base is 200 Professional Series 1.1 systems—179 in North America; 2,108 Manager Series 6.2 systems--1,692 in North America; and 130 School Series systems, all in North America. Total installations at the end of 1993 was 2,438—2,001 in North America. Of the Professional Series 1.1 sites, 92% each were using local cataloging and authority control; 79% were using circulation; 82% OPAC; 23% acquisitions; and 33% were using serials control. Seventy-three percent of the sites had a LAN interface, and 84% had OCLC, RLIN, WLN, BiblioFile, or LaserCat interface capability. Two Professional Series 1.1 sites supported 400+ devices; four had 100-199; one had 60-99; five had 30-60; two had 16-29; 18 had 8-15; 112 had 2-7; and 56 had one device. Major enhancements for 1993 were Professional Series' enhanced performance; the Main Menu can now be user-defined by user log-in; SICI barcode check-in; more user-defined options; and stopwords automatically excluded in keyword searches in both staff and public catalogs. In addition, the ability to search down to the single character level in the OPAC was enhanced, the year of publication was added to the OPAC browse list, and on-order records from acquisitions now display in OPAC. Staff searching opt ions were expanded to include ISBN/ ISSN, location (with title) data update, and author/title (composite index); and LC MARC rules file updated to USMARC Update No. 4.

Of the Manager Series 6.2 sites, 71% were using local cataloging and authority control; 53% had circulation and inventorying; 47% had serials control; 33% had OPAC; 30% had acquisitions; 6% had materials booking; and 5% had report generator. Seventy-three percent had a LAN interface; and 31% each had OCLC, RLIN, WLN, BiblioFile, and LaserCat interface capabilities. Two of the Manager Series 6.2 sites supported 200-399 devices; three had 100-199; five had 30-60; one had 16-29; 23 had 8-15; 692 had 2-7; and 1,382 had just one device. For the Manager Series, Data Trek spent the majority of 1993 soliciting enhancement feedback from clients, analyzing the needs of the marketplace, and developing a complete Manager Series product upgrade for 1994 as a result. The new Manager Series Version 7.0 covers all modules and includes over 200 enhancements. Most enhancements are the direct result of client votes cast at many national user-group meetings and by mail. Manager Series 7.0 is being beta-tested and will be released in 1994.

Of the School Series sites, 100% were using local cataloging and authority control as well as circulation and inventorying; 100% had online patron access catalog; and 73% had a LAN interface; and 100% had OCLC, RLIN, WLN, BiblioFile, and LaserCat interface capabilities. One of the School Series sites supported 30-60; one had 16-29; 13 had 8-15; 50 had 2-7; and 65 had just one device.

Data Trek reported 1993 gross sales of $5-$10 million with an after-tax profit. For all products, the company reported 11 staff devoted to software maintenance and development; 14 to sales and marketing (plus 6 others international); and 14 to customer support (plus 5 more international). Besides the headquarters office in Carlsbad, the company maintains offices in Douglastown (NY), Boston, Bend (OR), France, England, Canada, and Australia, and has distributors in Columbus (OH), Mountain View (CA), Port Angeles (WA), Italy, Spain, and Poland.

[Data Trek, Inc., 5838 Edison Place, Carlsbad, CA 92008; (619) 431-8400 or (800) 876-5484; fax (619) 431-8448.]

Follett Software Company offers both turnkey and software only products--Alliance Plus, Catalog Plus, and Circulation Plus. The Alliance Plus, Catalog Plus, and Circulation Plus systems operate under MS-DOS 5.0 or higher. Circulation Plus is available also for use on Apple lie and 11g. C and C++ are the programming languages. New development is in C++ and Follett is in the process of migrating existing products to C++ as well.

The company sold 4,689 systems (approximately 3,074 were new name sales) in 1993, bringing its total number of installed and accepted systems to 21,300-21,00l in North America. All sites were using local cataloging, circulation, report generator, and inventorying, and 35% were using OPAC. Forty percent had a LAN interface and 16.8% had database interfaces using Alliance Plus only. Follett does not keep track of how customers obtain their data other than Follett's data services and Alliance Plus CD-ROM MARC database. Follett's automation systems will import and export data in USMARC format. Follett has successfully imported data from OCLC, RLIN, Utlas, WLN, BiblioFile, LaserCat, and many other databases and data, vendors via floppy diskettes and MARC tapes. Follett does not track installation size data since the company does not charge a per-workstation fee. The number of workstations usable is dependent on the Network Operating Software the customer is using. Circulation Plus and Catalog Plus systems are single-site licenses. Alliance Plus is offered with a District Site License to allow an unlimited number of libraries within one district to use the software. For all products, Follett again reported gross sales of $15-$20 million (up from $10-$15 million in 1991) with an after-tax profit. The company reported a staff of 46 was committed to software development and maintenance, 59 to sales/marketing, and 52 to customer support. The company reported the following major enhancements in 1993: new versions of Follett's Circulation Plus and Catalog Plus will require more powerful computer hardware but will provide much additional functionality. Existing customers will be able to move easily to the new generation of products once their hardware environment matches specifications. More than 70% of the 140+ features added to the new generation of Follett's products were customer-contributed ideas.

[Follett Software Company, 809 North Front Street, McHenry, IL 60050; (815) 344-8700 or (800) 323-3397; fax (815) 344-8774.]

INLEX, Inc. sold The Assistant in Fall, 1993 to Data Trek, Inc. Survey information for 1993 was not provided. However, Data Trek has stated its intention to continue support of Assistant software, and honor current support agreements.

Inmagic, Inc. offers a software-only product known as INMAGIC Plus for Libraries. It is a PC-based product which also runs on networks and on multi-user platforms. The hardware platform is IBM PCs and compatibles, DEC VAX/MicroVAX, running DOS and VMS operating systems. The product is written in C and FORTRAN. The company reported 800 sales during 1993, none of which were indicated as new name sales.

A breakdown consisted of 5% each of public and academic libraries, 80% special, and 10% school libraries. More than 6,200 packages have been sold worldwide-—3,500 in North America. A breakdown by library type consisted of 80% special libraries, 10% school libraries, and 5% each academic and public libraries. The company did not report a gross revenue range nor if it had an after-tax profit for 1993 but in 1992 it reported gross revenues in the $2.5-$5 million range and an after-tax profit. Since the product is not sold by module, no actual figures were available. However, the company reported that all sites were able to have the following modules: acquisitions, local cataloging, authority control, circulation, serials control, OPAC, ILL, materials booking, report generator, journal citation, inventorying, and community information, as well as OCLC, RLIN, Utlas, BiblioFile and LAN interfaces and interface to other systems from the same vendor. Five sites supported 100-199 devices; six supported 60-99; 30 had 30-60; 70 had 16-29; 275 had 8-15; 2,500 had 2-7; and about half of all sites supported just one terminal. The company reported a staff of four was committed to software maintenance and development, five to sales/marketing, and three to customer support. The major enhancements during 1993 included: the image version of INMAGIC Plus was released, enabling users to attach images to INMAGIC Plus records. Also released was SearchMAGIC Plus, an upgraded version of the search-only front end. In addition to the headquarters in Woburn, the company reported authorized dealers located all over the U.S., as well as in Canada, Australia, and Europe.

(Inmagic, Inc., 800 West Cummmings Park, Woburn, MA 01801; (800) 229-TEXT/(617) 938-4442; fax (617) 937-6393.]

ISM Library Information Services (formerly Utlas International) offers a software-only product known as M/Series 10 for IBM-compatible PCs running on DOS. The database management system is Ocelot, and programming languages are C and PASCAL. The company reported 50 system sales in 1993 (none were new name), bringing its total installed base to 911—all in North America. The system is installed almost exclusively in school libraries, with just one special library installation. Separate financials for M/series 10 are not available, but the company as a whole reported revenues of $10-$15 million. The company did not report whether it was profitable in 1993. All sites were using authority control, report generator, and OPAC modules; and 46% each had circulation and cataloging. All of the sites had an Utlas interface. No information was reported on the number of users supported at each site. The company had a staff of 16 committed to software maintenance and development, 11 to sales and marketing, and 10 to customer support—these figures apply to all library automation products and are not limited to M/Series 10. After 1993, ISM was no longer actively marketing this product. In addition, the vendor ceased to distribute the Auto-Graphics SLiMS product in Canada. A program is now in place that will enable M/series 10 customers to migrate to SLiMS.

(ISM Library Information Services, 3300 Bloor Street West, West Tower, Etobicoke, Ontario M8X 2X2 Canada; (416) 236-2287, ext. 280; fax (416) 236-7489.)

Library Technologies, Inc. offers a software-only product called Bib-Base which operates in a PC environment. The hardware is IBM PC compatibles with CD-ROM and hard disk drives. The operating system is MS-DOS; the programming language is PASCAL+. The company reported 17 sales in 1993 (16 were new name sales), and reported its customer base at 350-330 in North America (10% in public libraries, 60% academic, and 30% special libraries). Total sales were under $1 million, with an after-tax profit. Ninety percent of the sites were using acquisitions, and 40% were using local cataloging. The online patron access catalog module was in use at 20% of the sites. Ten percent of sites were using the BiblioFile interface; 50% had an OCLC interface; 10% had an RLIN interface; and 25% had a LAN interface. Ten sites supported 2-7 devices and 340 had only one device. A staff of .5 FTE was committed to software maintenance and development, .5 FTE to sales/marketing, and .5 FTE to customer support. Major enhancements included the addition of a new screen editor, expansion of the BISAC acquisitions module to include more vendors, and the addition of an authority module.

[Library Technologies, Inc. ll42E Bradfield Road, Abington, PA 19001; (215) 576-6983; fax (215) 576-0137.]

Nichols Advanced Technologies, Inc. offers a software-only product known as MOLLI, as well as barcode readers, peripherals, and retrospective conversion services. MOLLI runs on IBM compatible micros. The operating system is MS-DOS, and the programming languages are C and compiled dBase. The vendor reported sales of approximately 355 packages in 1993, all new name sales. The company was supporting 1,502 installed systems at the end of 1993—with 1,474 in North America (4% public libraries, 2% academic, 9% special, and 85% school libraries). Gross sales were $1-$2.5 million, with an after-tax profit. All sites had the same software capability for MARC record import, local cataloging, circulation, OPAC, report generator, and inventorying. All sites had the OCLC, WLN, LaserCat, or BiblioFile interface. One percent of the sites were using acquisitions and serials control. Remote database searching and interface with other library systems from the same vendor were also in use at 2% of the sites; and 41% had a local area network interface. Four sites had 200-399 devices; three had 100-199; four had 60-99; five had 30-60; 15 had 16-29; 15 had 8-15; 565 had 2-7; and 867 had only one device. The company reported that five staff were assigned to software maintenance and development, 20 to sales and marketing, and four to customer support. The vendor recently released a barcode reader that can read old Apple Circulation barcode labels (such as Winnebago and Follett as well as industry standard labels), allowing users of older circulation systems to upgrade to the MOLLI integrated system without re-barcoding their books. Comprehensive new MOLLI training sessions and a detailed training manual were released. In addition to LaCrosse, Nichols maintains a Canadian office in Edmonton, Alberta.

[Nichols Advanced Technologies, Inc., 3452 Losey Blvd. South, LaCrosse, WI 54601; (800) 658-9453 or (608) 787-8333; fax (608) 787-8337.]

On Point, Inc. offers a software-only package, known as TLC (Total Library Computerization). The hardware is IBM or compatible PCs, but a multi-user network is available. The operating system is DOS, and code is written in AskSam. The company reported that all information regarding number of systems sold or installed, profitability, breakdown of modules in use, etc., was “proprietary.” The company did report that its revenues were under $1 million, that all of its sites were special libraries, and all of its sales were to new customers. Some 20% of the sites were supporting 2-7 devices; and 80% supported a single terminal. Two staff members were committed to software maintenance and development, one to sales and marketing, and one to customer support. Major enhancements during 1993: barcoding option for the circulation module, Version 2.0 with intermodular transfer of information and enhanced cross-modular searching capability.

[On Point, Inc., 2606 36th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20007; (202) 338-8914.]

VTLS, Inc., better known for its multiuser systems, is also covered in the March-April 1994 LSN Multiuser Survey. This entry is for Micro VTLS, PC-based multi-user system product which runs on any hardware with DOS as the operating system and is offered either as a turnkey system or as software only. The languages used are dBase III and Clipper. The company reported 16 system sales in 1993, all new name, bringing its total to 74 in North America, 92 worldwide. A breakdown by library type consisted of 65% public libraries, 22% special, 12% academic, and 1% school libraries. The organization's gross sales were between $5 and $10 million (a figure which includes multi-user sales), and it realized an after-tax profit. The company reported that all sites were using circulation and OPAC modules; 80% were using local cataloging and remote database searching; 30% used authority control; and 2% used acquisitions. Some 45% were using the OCLC interface; 10% BiblioFile's interface. A LAN interface was used by 98%; an interface to other systems by the same vendor by 80%; and 30% had LC authorities CD-ROM interface. Two percent of the sites had an Internet interface. Sixty-two sites were supporting 8-15 devices; 25 had 2-7 devices, and five had one device.

VTLS reported that a staff of 25 was committed to software maintenance and development, 12 to sales/marketing, and 23 to customer support at the end of 1993. Major enhancements during the year included a completely redesigned user interface to Micro-VTLS 3.0. Simplistic pull-down menus accompanied by highlight bars and index browsing created a more user-friendly environment. The ability to customize the software to each library's needs was expanded. A faster routing for loading MARC records was incorporated as well as the ability to browse all databases. Statistics and reporting capabilities were improved in late 1993 and continue to be a priority in 1994. VTLS has offices in Helsinki, Barcelona, Long Beach, Fillmore (NY), Houston, and its headquarters office in Blacksburg. Agents are also located in Malaysia, Australia, Switzerland, Thailand, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates.

[VTLS, Inc., 1800 Kraft Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060; (800) 468-8857 or (703) 231-3637; fax (703) 231-3648.]

Winnebago Software Company offers software-only and peripherals that run on IBM PCs/compatibles and Macintosh. The operating systems are MS-DOS and Apple; the DBMS and programming language is Btrieve and Turbo Pascal for PC-based systems, and C-tree and C/C+ for the Macintosh-based systems. The company sold 2,600 PC-based systems in 1993 (2,347 new name sales and 657 Macintosh-based systems (557 new name Sales) during the year, bringing its worldwide customer total to over 16,480—the 15,990 in North America. PC-based systems consisted of 15% public libraries, 2% special, 3% academic, and 80% school libraries; Mac-based systems consisted of 5% public libraries, 2% special, 1% academic, and 92% school libraries. The company reported gross revenues of between $10 and $15 million and realized an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, circulation, report generator, and inventorying; 85% were using OPAC; and 30% were using acquisitions. Sixty percent of the sites had the OCLC, RLIN, Utlas, WLN, LaserCAT, or BiblioFile interface. A LAN interface was used by 84% of sites. Nine hundred seventy sites had 30-60 devices; 6,282 had 8-15; 5,235 had 2-7; and 2,493 had only one device. A staff of 18 was committed to software maintenance and development, 54 to sales, 31 to marketing, and 17 to customer support. Enhancements to the PC-based system included an update of Version 4.0—-search using cross-reference, multilevel password; advance booking; ILL; and bilingual CAT. For Mac systems, Winnebago released an update of Version 2.0 featuring in-library usage; system status displaying hardware information on each computer; fine rate conformity to international dollar standard; ability to create a user-defined index for reports; and the ability to maintain a running tally of fines.

[Winnebago Software Company, 457 East South, Caledonia, MN 55921; (507) 724-5697 or (800) 654-3002; fax (507) 724-5711.]

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View Citation
Publication Year:1994
Type of Material:Article
Language English
Published in: Library Systems Newsletter
Publication Info:Volume 14 Number 05
Issue:May 1994
Page(s):33-40
Publisher:American Library Association
Place of Publication:Chicago, IL
Notes:Howard S. White, Editor-in-Chief; Richard W. Boss, Contributing Editor
Company: Auto-Graphics, Inc.
Brodart, Inc.
Canopy Road Software
Caspr, Inc.
Chancery Software, Ltd.
McGraw-Hill School Systems
Data Trek, Inc.
EOS International
Follett Software Company
INLEX, Inc.
Inmagic, Inc.
ISM Library Information Services
Library Technologies, Inc.
Nichols Advanced Technologies Inc.
Sagebrush Technologies
ON POINT, Inc.
VTLS, Inc.
Winnebago Software Company
Products: Impact/SLiMS
AGILE III
Media Minder
LibraryWorks
LibraryBrowser
Macschool Library
Columbia Library System
Professional Series
Manager Series
School Series
Alliance Plus
Catalog Plus
Circulation Plus
The Assistant
Inmagic Plus
M/Series 10
Bib-Base
MOLLI
Total Library Computerization
MicroVTLS
CIRC/CAT
Subject: Library automation systems -- directories
Library automation systems -- microcomputer based
ISSN:0277-0288
Record Number:7527
Last Update:2022-08-15 13:00:36
Date Created:0000-00-00 00:00:00
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