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Annual survey of automated library system vendors: integrated, multi-user, multi-function systems running on main-frames, minis, and micros that use a multi-user operating system

Library Systems Newsletter [March / April 1998]


Each year Library Systems Newsletter surveys the library automation industry to get an overview of the market and to facilitate comparison among vendors. This double issue is devoted to the responses of vendors offering integrated, multi-user, multi-function systems-those running on mainframes and minis, or supermicros using a multi-user operating system. The May issue will summarize survey results for PC- and Mac-based systems.

The survey is limited to products that integrate several modules into a single system. Almost all of the products discussed here include the core modules: acquisitions, serials control, cataloging, circulation, and online patron access catalog (OPAC). Most have additional modules: inventorying, information & referral (I&R), interlibrary loan (ILL), journal citation files, media booking, etc. Almost all offer graphical user interfaces (GUIs) for all modules and a Web-based user interface for the patron access catalog. Most also support Z39.50-based linkages to other systems. EDIFACT online ordering and claiming is also beginning to become available.

METHODOLOGY

This survey uses the same methodology employed in previous years. Vendors were contacted by mail and fax, with follow-up by telephone, fax, and e-mail, as necessary. Our queries focused on whether the product was available as a turnkey system, as software only, or as both; the major hardware platform(s); database management system (DBMS), operating system and programming language(s), "new name" sales during the past calendar year; total number of installations; the number of sites that discontinued use of the system during the past year; gross sales for the year; profitability; the percentage of customers using each module or major function; the number of users for which the systems are licensed; and the number of staff devoted to software maintenance and development, sales and marketing, and to other customer support. Major software enhancements reported by the vendors also are included.

Previous surveys have contained information on companies not included this year. However, the 22 companies which are included in this survey are believed to represent about 98% of North American sales and perhaps 70% of sales in the rest of the world.

Several companies sell two or more distinct products, such as Ameritech Library Services (Dynix and Horizon), EOS International ("T" and "Q" Series), Gaylord Information Systems (Galaxy and Polaris), and Geac Computers, Inc. (Advance and Plus). Information about the products has been separated as much as possible.

SUMMARY

The statistics would indicate a dramatic downturn in number of systems sold in 1997. The decline was only the third since 1984; the others were in 1985 and in 1996. These numbers are always open to interpretation but are nonetheless indicative.

After adding in estimates for the vendors who were not included in this year's survey, the total sales of vendors offering integrated multi-user, multi-function automated library systems was around $430 million in 1997-down from nearly $450 million in 1996 and in 1995. Ameritech's revenues exceeded $90 million; Innovative Interfaces, Inc., $60-$70 million; Geac, in excess of $50 million [author's estimate]; DRA just over $35 million; and Information Dimensions, $20-$25 million. BLCMP, CARL, Ex Libris, Gaylord, and Sisis each reported revenues of $10-$15 million; Endeavor reported revenues of just under $10 million; and VTLS reported revenues of $5-$10 million. ELiAS and International Library Systems had revenues of $2.5-$5 million each; Fretwell-Downing and Gateway each had revenues of $2-$2.5 million. Keystone, Stowe, and NSC each reported revenues of under $1 million. EOS International and Sirsi did not provide data, but probably had revenues in the range of $15 million and $25 million, respectively.


Table 1. Industry-wide System Sales By Year
YearNo. of Systems Sold
(Including estimates for
Year non-respondents)
1997
-----------------------------------------991
1996
------------------------------------------- 1,520
1995
---------------------------------------------------------- 2,322
1994
------------------------------------------------- 1,853
1993
---------------------------------------------- 1,600
1992
--------------------------------------- 1,121
1991
---------------------------------- 674
1990
------------------------------ 566
1989
--------------------------- 435
1988
------------------------ 376
1987
--------------------- 350
1986
-------------- 210
1985
------------ 196
1984
----------------- 232

There appear to be three distinct, but related reasons for the decrease in new name sales in 1996 and 1997, and the downturn in revenues in 1997:

Aging Product Lines-In 1995, the most widely installed type of multi-user systems were hierarchical systems which had already been around for a decade or more: Ameritech's Dynix, DRA's Classic, EOS's "T" Series, Geac's Plus, and VTLS. While functionally rich, these systems did not meet librarians' expectations with regard to architecture. The professional literature stressed client/server architecture and graphical user interfaces as the future. To be a true client/server product, the server has to export raw data and the presentation has to be controlled by the desktop client. Failing to find mature client/server products in the library automation marketplace, librarians chose to delay new system purchases. Revenues did not fall in 1996 because many libraries sought to extend the lives of their existing systems by two to three years by upgrading or replacing hardware components. All of the aforementioned hierarchical products saw substantial reductions in new name sales in 1996, and again in 1997.

Incomplete Client/Server Products- By 1997 a number of client/server products had become available, but they were functionally less rich than the older, hierarchical systems. Among the major vendors which had announced that they were developing new client/server products were DRA, EOS International, Gaylord, and VTLS. Since none was expected to be complete until 1998, there were few sales of the new products-and new name sales of the existing hierarchical products offered by these companies dropped off.

Only Ameritech had a relatively mature client/server product available at the beginning of 1997, but it did not sell well because of confusion within the company after two major reorganizations and changes in leadership, and the traditional focus of the Horizon sales staff on the academic and special library markets, therefore, failing to see the potential for client/server products in the public library market.

The only true client/server product which experienced a significant increase in sales during 1997 was Voyager by Endeavor. Sales more than doubled from 28 systems in 1996 to 66 in 1997, but few were large systems. Only eleven of the first 100 sales Endeavor made were to large academic research libraries. Nevertheless, this tied it with Ameritech's Horizon for the lead in client/ server installations in large academic research libraries.

Infrastructure Development-The expectation that client/server technology with graphical user interfaces would require replacement of "dumb" terminals and low-end PCs, and upgrading of networks, led many libraries to focus their 1996 and 1997 purchases on building the necessary infrastructure for the next generation of automated library systems. Ninety academic and public libraries surveyed by the author in late-1997 reported that they had spent more than 65% of their automation budgets on PCs and networks, or on Internet access.

Most vendors of automated library systems will not be able to offer client/ server products with functionality comparable to the hierarchical products which they have been offering until the third or fourth quarter of 1998, therefore, a market upturn should not be expected before 1999.

The total number of multi-user system installations-those using UNIX, NT server, VMS, or another multi-user operating system-at the end of 1997 was approximately 13,500.

Table 2 ranks the vendors by the number of new name system sales (sales to other than existing customers) in 1997 asreported by the vendors themselves. Table 3 ranks the total installed and accepted systems, of the vendors with at least 35 installations. Table 4 ranks vendors by the number of systems supporting at least 200 concurrent users; Table 5 ranks the vendors by the number of staff devoted to software maintenance/ development; Table 6, by the number of staff devoted to customer support; and Table 7 by the ratio of support staff to the number of installed systems.

The vendor reports are arranged alphabetically and are based on information supplied by the respondents.


Table 2. Vendors Reporting 11 or more
New Name Sales in 1997
Vendor No. of Systems Sold
Ameritech 166
DRA 155k
Sirsi 128
Innovative Interfaces 87
Endeavor 66
Geac59
Ex Libris 54
International Library Systems 30
Sisis 29
EOS International 28
Fretwell-Downing 21
VTLS 18
Gaylord 15
Gateway 12
Information Dimensions 12
* The DRA figure requires an explanation: 136 of the sales were to school libraries which made a single procurement, but have separate central sites and system licenses.


Table 3. Total Number of Installed and Accepted Systems
Vendor No. of Installed
Systems
Ameritech 3,509*
EOS International 2,615**
DRA 1,137
Sirsi 769
Innovative Interfaces 744
Geac 694
International Library Systems 500+
Sisis 400+
Gaylord 337
VTLS 296
Ex Libris 264
Information Dimensions 248
Gateway 124
Stowe Computing 116
ELiAS 109
Endeavor 100
Fretwell-Downing 92
BLCMP 85
NSC Inc. 43
CARL 36
All other vendors claimed fewer than 35 installations each or did not report data,

* The Ameritech figure includes a large number of small Dynix Scholar systems in school libraries.

** The Eos figure includes a large number of small systems sold by IME, a company absorbed into EOS in 1997.



Table 4. Total Number of Installed Systems Supporting More than 200 conncurrent Users
Vendor No. of
Vendor Large Systems
DRA 363
Ameritech197
VTLS 66
Innovative Interfaces 64
Sirsi45
Information Dimensions 40
Geac 37
CARL 27
Endeavor 19
Ex Libris 12
Gateway 10
All other vendors claimed fewer than 10 large installations each or did not report data. There is no data for the number of large systems sold in 1997.


Table 5. Staff Devoted to Software Maintenance and Development
VendorTotal Software
Maint./Devel. Staff
Ameritech 139
DRA 124
Geac 65
CARL 54
VTLS 44
Innovative Interfaces 42
BLCMP 40
Sirsi 30
Ex Libris 28
EOS International 28
Gaylord 24
Endeavor 22
Fretwell-Downing 20
Sisis 20
International Library Systems 18
All other vendors had fewer than 15 staff each devoted to software maintenance and development or did not report data.


Table 6. Staff Devoted to Customer Support Total Customer Vendor Support Staff
Ameritech 440
Geac 180
Innovative Interfaces 105
Sirsi 81
DRA 58
CARL 35
Gaylord 34
Ex Libris 33
BLCMP 25
VTLS 23
Endeavor 22
ELiAS 20
EOS International 18
Information Dimensions 12
Fretwell-Downing 10
All other companies had fewer than 10 staff each devoted to customer support or did not supply data


Table 7. Ratio of Customer Support Staff to Number of Installed System for vendors with more than 10 support staff and at least 50 installations
Vendor Ratio of
Staff:Installations
Geac 1:4
Endeavor 1:5
Innovative 1:7
Ameritech 1:8
Ex Libris 1:8
Fretwell-Downing 1:9
Sirsi 1:9
Gaylord 1:10
VTLS 1:13
DRA 1:20
Information Dimensions 1:21
EOS International 1:145*
* The EOS figure includes a large number of small systems sold by IME, a company absorbed into EOS in 1997.

COMPANY REPORTS

Advanced Computer Concepts, Inc., the vendor of FLEXLIB, offers both turnkey systems and software packages. There are several hardware platforms, including Sun and Hewlett-Packard. Both UNIX and NT operating systems are offered. MUMPS is used as the database management system and programming language.

The company sells primarily to academic and special libraries. It made one new name sale in 1997, bringing its total number of sites to seven, including five in North America and two in Asia/Oceania. Four of the installed systems supported 400+ users; the other three supported only 6-9 users.

In addition to the core modules, inventorying, I&R, materials booking, ILL, and imaging are available. GUI is available for staff modules; both GUI and Web-based user interfaces are available for the patron access catalog. An OCLC interface is offered and Z39.50 client/ server linkages are supported. The company did not provide information about the percentage of customers using each of the modules.

The firm reported a profit on sales of approximately $1 million in 1997. It had five staff committed to software development, none to marketing and sales, and two to customer support.

The major software enhancements in 1997 were a revamped Web interface and the introduction of online images of rare books.

[Advanced Computer Concepts, Inc., 46 Hillvale, St. Louis, MO 63105; (314) 862-1898; fax (314) 721-1898; E-mail simont@simon.com; Web Page: simon.com.]

Ameritech Library Services was formed in 1994 by consolidating Dynix and NOTIS, formerly two separate companies. In 1997, the company had discontinued new sales of NOTIS, a mainframe-based system still installed at 126 libraries, but was still actively supporting it. It also continued to support 14 PALS sites, another mainframe-based product purchased from Unisys when that company withdrew from the library automation market. The company also supported 29 Urica systems in Europe. As of 1997, Ameritech was selling two major systems: Dynix and Horizon. The former uses a hierarchical architecture; the latter uses client/ server.

Dynix is sold both as a turnkey system and as software-only, but the vast majority of customers in 1997 opted for the turnkey system. After offering a wide range of hardware platforms for several years, in 1996, the company sought to limit itself to Hewlett-Packard hardware for new sales. Only a few months later it recommitted itself to the IBM RS/6000 line and added Sun as a third platform option. Compaq is offered for small systems. The operating systems are UNIX and NT. Character-based terminals are supported, as well as PCs with Windows 95 or NT. The database management system is Universe and the programming languages are C++, PlC, BASIC, JAVA, and Visual BASIC.

The company markets to all types of libraries. It made 90 new name Dynix sales in 1997 (down from 117 in 1996), bringing its total installed base to 2,929 worldwide-2,262 in North America, 539 in Asia/Oceania, 126 in Europe, and two in Africa/Middle East. Forty libraries discontinued using Dynix in 1997. The customer base included 25% public, 12% academic, 3% special, and 60% school libraries at the end of 1997. Recent sales to school libraries have been at the district level, rather than at the individual school level, therefore, the percentage of school library sites is dropping, and will continue to drop.

All of the core modules are in general release. In addition, the company offers inventorying, ILL, materials booking, journal citation files, information & referral, and imaging. GUI is available for staff modules; both GUI and Web-based user interfaces are available for the patron access catalog. There are OCLC, RLIN, and WLN interfaces available. EDIFACT online ordering and claiming are in development. While almost all sites were using cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog at the end of 1997, only 55% were using acquisitions, 55% were using inventorying, 30% were using serials control, and 20% were using I&R. Interlibrary loan and imaging were in use by only 1% each. Some 40% had a Z39.50 server. Most of the libraries were still using character-based interface for the patron access catalog, with 10% using the GUI and 5% the Web-based user interface.

Dynix is installed in a wide range of sites. At the end of 1997, 29 sites had systems supporting over 400 users and another 58 supported 200-399 users. At the other extreme, there were 1,287 sites with systems supporting five or fewer users-mostly school libraries.

The major software developments were the introduction of the GUI-based patron access catalog; interlibrary loan (called the Resource Sharing System) on a separate hardware platform so that it can be used with Dynix, Horizon, or NOTIS; EDI x.12 online ordering and invoicing; and porting of the product to the NT operating system.

The company did not separate financial information or staffing levels by product. The combined information is at the end of the vendor entry.

Horizon is offered as a turnkey or software-only product on Hewlett-Packard, IBM RS/6000, Sun, or Compaq platforms. It is available either as a UNIX or NT product. It is a true client/server product, therefore, the clients must use Windows 95 or NT-there is no character- based user interface. The DBMS is Sybase, SQL server; the code is written in Modula and C++.

The product is marketed to academic and special libraries, but a few public libraries have purchased it. There were 76 new name sales in 1997 (down from 126 in 1996), and one site discontinued use of the product. The total installed base was 411 at the end of the year, including 42% in academic libraries, 52% in special libraries, 5% in public libraries, and 1% in school libraries. The size of sites is not known, since licensing is not based on the number of users, but on database size.

Almost all sites were using cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog at the end of 1997, but only half were using acquisitions and only 75% were using serials control. Journal citation files was in use by 75% of the sites, and imaging by 25%. Some 30% of the sites were using the Web-based OPAC. Materials booking and information & referral are not available. Interlibrary loan has recently been made available. GUI is available for all modules. There are interfaces to OCLC, RLIN, and WLN. Z39.50 is supported, as is EDIFACT online ordering and claiming.

The major software enhancements for Horizon in 1997 were the completion of the move from the IBM/OS operating system for the clients to Windows 95 and NT, the introduction of an interlibrary loan module, and EDI x.12 serials claiming.

Ameritech continues to be the largest vendor in the industry. It reported sales of $90-$100 million in 1997, and realized an after-tax profit. The total number of staff in software development and maintenance-including the NOTIS and PALS products-was 139 at the end of 1997. There also were 111 in marketing and sales and 440 in customer support.

The company maintains U.S. offices in Provo, UT, Evanston, IL, and Mankato, MN. Also, Waterloo, ON and France, Ireland, The Netherlands, England, Germany, Australia, Mexico, and Saudi Arabia.

[Ameritech Library Services, 400 Dynix Drive, Provo, UT 84604-5650; (801) 223-5200 or (800) 223-5413; fax (801) 223- 5202; Web Page: www.amlibs.com.]

BLCMP Library Services Ltd. offers TALIS as both a turnkey system and software-only product on Sun and Data General hardware platforms. The operating systems are UNIX and Solaris; SYBASE is the DBMS. The programming languages are C and C++.

The company sold eight new name systems in 1997, three to public libraries and five to academic libraries, bringing the total number of sites to 85-all in Europe.

Almost all of the customers were using local cataloging, circulation, and the patron access catalog at the end of 1997. Some 85% were using acquisitions, but only 20% had serials control. Materials booking and I&R were used by 20% each, 12% were using ILL, and 10% were using inventorying. There is no support for journal citation files or imaging. EDIFACT online ordering and claiming are available. Both GUI and Web-based patron access catalog interfaces are available.

The typical site is mid-size (60-200 users), but there were four installations with 200+ users in 1997 and two with fewer than nine users.

The company reported sales of $10- $15 million in 1997, with an after-tax profit. There were 40 staff committed to software maintenance and development, 7 to sales and marketing, and 25 to customer support.

The major software developments in 1997 were a revamping of the patron access catalog module and the introduction of an I&R module.

[BLCMP Library Services Ltd., Institute of Research and Development, Birmingham Research Park, vincent Drive, Birmingham B1S 2SQ, England; +44 121 471 1179; fax +44 121 472 0298; Internet: info@ blcmp.org.uk; Web: www.blcmp.org.uk/]

Carl Corporation offers The CARL System as both turnkey and software-only. The hardware is Tandem; the operating system is Tandem's Non-Stop Kernel; and the DBMS is Tandemts Enscribe. Applications are written in C, C++, and Pascal for GUI products and TAL (Tandem Application Language) for character-based applications. An associated gateway server uses the Sun Solaris operating system and runs on Sun computers.

CARL reported nine sales in 1997, including one new name sale, bringing its total installed base to 36-all in North America. One site discontinued use of the system in 1997. Consortia are the company's specialty-44% of the installations are consortia. Public libraries are more common than academic: 36% vs. 13%. School libraries constitute the remaining 8%.

All of the sites were using local cataloging, circulation, inventorying, patron access catalog, ILL, and journal citation files at the end of 1997. Some 80% each were using acquisitions and serials control. Community information was in use by 41% of sites, and Z39.50 by 36%. While 80% were using the GUI patron access catalog, only 8% were using GUI technical services. Just over half were using the Web-based patron access catalog interface. Materials booking was in testing at the end of 1997. Z39.50 client/server is available, as are OCLC and BiblioFile interfaces. EDIFACT will be supported when a customer requests it.

CARL systems tend to be large, with 15 supporting over 400 users, 12 from 200-399, and six from 100-199 at the end of 1997. There were only three systems supporting 30-59 users, and none smaller.

CARL's revenues were between $10 and $15 million in 1997, with no reported profit. The company had 54 staff devoted to software maintenance and development at the end of 1997, 12 to sales and marketing, and 35 to customer support.

The major software developments in 1997 were Year 2000 accommodation; a flew GUI suite for cataloging; and work on new GUI enhancements for acquisitions, serials control, and circulation for release in early 1998. A new GUI-based reports module was completed.

[CARL Corporation, 3801 E. Florida Ave., Suite 300, Denver, CO 80210; (303) 758-3030; fax (303) 758-0606; Web Page: www.carl.org.]

Data Research Associates (DRA) offers both turnkey system and software-only options. The company sells four products: DRA Classic, MultiLIS, Inlex, and Taos. Inlex, which uses HP MPE, is no longer being sold, but it is supported.

The company did not provide separate reports for the products. DRA Classic and multiLIS utilize the OpenVMS and UNIX operating systems and Taos-a new client/server product-uses Windows NT and Unix. All of the products use C, C++ or Visual C++ as the programming language. DRA Classic uses a proprietary database manager, but Taos uses Object Store. The Taos clients are NT-based, except any CGI-compliant Web browser can be used with the patron access catalog.

DRA Classic is sold worldwide; MultiLIS is sold primarily in Europe. Taos sales began in the latter part of the year. There were 187 sales in 1997, including 155 new name sales, most of them to school libraries participating in the InfOhio Project. The sales brought the total installed customer base to 1,137 at the end of 1997, including 1,041 in North America, 60 in Asia/Oceania, 35 in Europe, and 1 in South America. Two sites discontinued the use of the system in 1997. The customer base at the end of 1997 included 45% academic, 35% public, 11% school, and 4% special libraries.

All of the core modules are available in all products except Taos, which includes only cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog. Almost all DRA Classic and MultiLIS sites were using the core modules at the end of 1997. Almost all were using inventorying and ILL; but acquisitions was in use by only 80% and serials control by 70%. I&R was being used by 25%, journal citation files by 20%, and materials booking by 13%. GUI for staff and patrons was in use by approximately 17%, and the Web-based patron access catalog interface by 20%. Over 40% were using Z39.50 linkages and 17% were using EDIFACT online ordering and claiming. OCLC, RLIN, and BiblioFile interfaces are available. Z39.50 client/ server and EDIFACT online ordering and claiming are available.

The company combined all four products in its statistics about system size. Altogether, there were 20 systems supporting over 400 users and 343 supporting 200-399 users at the end of 1997-making DRA the undisputed leader in large systems. There also were nearly 250 systems supporting fewer than nine users each-most of them MultiLIS.

The vendor had sales of just over $35 million in 1997, down slightly from the previous year; but its profits were up to a record $4.45 million. There were 124 staff committed to software maintenance and development at the end of 1997, 33 to sales and marketing, and 58 to customer support.

The major software development in 1997 was the introduction of Taos cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog modules. The clients can be used with the other products. The company also successfully tested Unicode implementation in the Classic and Taos environments.

DRA maintains offices in St. Louis, Monterey, Montreal, Melbourne, Paris, and Singapore.

[Data Research Associates, Inc., 1276 North Warson Road, St. Louis, MO 63132-1806; (800) 325-0888 or (314) 432-1100; fax (314) 993-8927; URL: www.dra.com]

ELiAS, N.V. offers Extended Library Access Solutions as a software-only product for IBM RS/6000 and other UNIX-based IBM hardware. Distributors offer the system as a turnkey product. The operating system is AIX and the DBMS is available as Oracle or Fulcrum FUL/TEXT. Most of the code is written in C and CA OpenRoad.

The company sold four systems in 1997, all new name sales-two to academic and two to special libraries. While the total installed base was not reported, it probably is six, including five in Europe and one in North America. The company still provides support to over 100 DOBIS/LIBIS sites.

Patron access catalog and materials booking were being used by most of the sites at the end of 1997, but only 60% were using acquisitions, cataloging, circulation, and inventorying. GUI is available for all modules, but there is no Web-based interface for the patron access catalog. Z39.50 is supported.

The systems tend to be large, with two supporting over 400 users and three supporting 100-199 users.

The company had sales of $2.5-$5 million in 1997, and realized an after- tax profit. There were 8 software maintenance and enhancement staff at the end of 1997, 5 in sales and marketing, and 5 in customer support. The staffing figures the previous year were 20, 15, and 20, respectively, hence there has been significant downsizing.

The major software development in 1997 was the completion of the serials control module. The company, which is headquartered in Leuven, Belgium, has a partner office (CGI) in Ottawa, Canada.

[ELiAS N.V., 60 Kapeldreef, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium; (32) 16 27 0390; fax (32) 16 27 0319.]

Endeavor Information Systems offers the Voyager Library Series product both as a turnkey system and as a software-only package. It makes a substantial number of software-only sales. The major hard-ware platforms are Sun and IBM RS/6000. The operating systems are Sun Solaris and AIX (IBM's UNIX) for the server and Windows 3.1, Windows 95, Windows NT, and Windows for Workgroups for the clients. The DBMS is Oracle. The programming languages for the server are C and C++. The client presentation and application code are Visual BASIC and C++.

The company reported 66 sales in 1997-all new name sales. Over 77% were to academic libraries and 23% to special libraries. The total installed base at the end of 1997 was 100 systems, 98 in North America and two in Europe.

All sites were using all of the core modules at the end of 1997, but only 20% were using journal Citation files, 10% information & referral, and 4% imaging. Materials booking was in development at the end of 1997. GUI is available for all modules, and a Web-based OPAC is also available. OCLC and RLIN interfaces are available, and Z39.50 client/server is supported.

The sizes of installed systems ranged from nine supporting fewer than nine users to five supporting over 400. There were 14 supporting 200-399 users and 13 supporting 100 to 199. The largest concentration fell between 15 and 59 users: 49 sites.

The company had sales of nearly $10 million in 1997-double the previous year. It realized an after-tax profit. There were 22 staff committed to software maintenance and development at the end of 1997, 12 to sales and marketing, and 22 to customer support.

[Endeavor Information Systems, Inc., 2200 East Devon Avenue, Suite 382, Des Plaines, IL 60018; (800) 762-6300; fax (847) 296-5636; Internet: endeavor@endinfosys.com; Web Page: www.endinfosys.com.]

EOS International, created by the merger of Data Trek and IME, offers several product lines, most of them for use on PCs. This report is limited to the company's T Series and Q Series-the former a hierarchical system and the latter a new client/server product. Each is available as a turnkey system or as software only.

The T Series is available for Sun, Digital Alpha, IBM RS/6000 and other UNIX platforms. E-R Database is used as the database management system. The primary programming languages are 0+ and C++.

There were 60 sales of the T Series in 1997, including 23 new name sales (down from 136 in 1996). Over 39% of the sales were to academic libraries, 35% to special libraries, 17% to public, and 4% to school libraries. The total customer base at the end of 1997 was 2,609, including 2,194 in Europe, 235 in North America, 63 in Africa/Middle East, 62 in South America, and 55 in Asia/Oceania.

All of the core modules are available. Acquisitions was implemented by 23% of the sites, and serials control by 28%. There are no additional modules. The most widely implemented modules at the end of 1997 were cataloging and the patron access catalog, but neither by more than two-thirds of the sites. Fewer than 1% each used the Web-based patron access catalog interface and Z39.50. The unusual percentages are attributable to the fact that a number of libraries utilize the system only for acquisitions and/or serials control. There are OCLC, RLIN, WLN, and BiblioFile interfaces.

The system tends to be configured for small libraries: some 2,135 of the sites have fewer than 15 users. Only three have over 200 users.

The major software developments in 1997 were introduction of a new GUI patron access catalog, an enhanced circulation module, and the ability to handle the Year 2000.

The Q Series was introduced in 1997. It is available as a turnkey system or software-only for Sun and NT hardware platforms. The operating systems are Sun UNIX and NT. Client applications are available for Windows 95 and NT. The DBMS is ORACLE and the programming language is Power Builder.

The company sold 18 of the Q Series in 1997, including five new name accounts. Sixty percent of the new name sales were to special libraries, and 40% were to academic libraries. Of the six installed systems at the end of 1997, three were in North America, two in Europe, and one in Asia/Oceania.

All of the sites were using local cataloging, circulation, and the patron access catalog; and one-third were using acquisitions and serials control. All were using the GUI patron access catalog, and two-thirds were using the Web-based patron access catalog interface. There are no additional modules.

The Installed systems tend to be small, with only one supporting more than 30 users at the end of 1997.

The company declined to release financial information. It probably had revenues of around $15 million. It had 28 staff committed to software maintenance and development for both products, 27 to marketing and sales, and 18 to customer support at the end of 1997-the last resulting in an extraordinary 1:145 ratio of support staff to customers or more than 10 times the ratio of the rest of the industry.

The company maintains its headquarters in Carlsbad, CA and branch offices in Boston, London, Paris, and Singapore. It has over 40 distributors.

[EOS International, 5838 Edison Place, Carlsbad, CA 92008, (800) 876-5484, fax (760) 431-8448, e-mail sales@eosintl. com; Web Page: www.eosintl.com]

Ex Libis offers its multi-user Aleph product as both turnkey and software-only for the major hardware platforms of DEC, IBM, HP, and Sun; however, the majority of sales are software-only. The operating system is UNIX and the DBMS is ORACLE. The programming languages are C, C++, and Microfocus COBOL.

While the company continues to enhance its Aleph 300 product, the focus of new sales is on the Aleph BOO product. The company made 66 sales in 1997, including 54 new name sales (up from 48 in 1996).

Some 46% of the sales were to academic libraries, 8% to public, and the rest to a wide variety of special libraries and consortia. The total number of sites at the end of 1997 was 264, including 187 in Europe, 55 in Africa/Middle East, 12 in North America, and 10 in South America.

All of the core modules are available. Also available are inventorying, interlibrary loan, materials booking, journal citation files, I&R, and imaging. GUI is available for all modules, and a Web-based patron access catalog is available. There are not only OCLC and RLIN interfaces, but also interfaces to various other bibliographic utilities. Z39.50 client/server is supported. All libraries were using local cataloging, and most were using circulation and patron access catalog at the end of 1997. Interlibrary loan was in use at 20% of sites, inventorying at 15%, and materials booking, information & referral, and imaging at 10% each. GUI technical services were in use at 15% of sites, and the Web-based OPAC at 25%. Fewer than 20% had implemented Z39.50 client/server.

There were four sites with over 400 users in 1997, eight with 200-399, and 21 with 100-199. Some 65 sites supported fewer than 9 users. The rest were in the middle.

Sales in 1997 were between $10 and $15 million, with an after-tax profit. There were 28 staff committed to software maintenance and development, 12 to sales and marketing, and 33 to customer support.

The major software developments in 1997 were completion of the acquisitions and serials control modules.

In addition to its headquarters in Tel Aviv, Israel, the company maintains sales offices in the United States (Boston and Chicago), Brazil, Argentina, Luxembourg, and Germany. There are distributors in several other countries.

[Ex Libris (USA) Inc., One Walnut Street, Newburyport, MA 01950, (978) 499-0811; fax (978) 499-0812; Internet: rbaum@ ibm.net; Web Page: www.aleph.co.il]

Fertwell-Downing Informatics Limited, offers its OLIB product as both turnkey and software-only. The product is available on a wide range of hardware platforms which support UNIX or NT. Oracle is the DBMS, and the programming languages are C, Visual C++, XCGI, and PL/SQL.

The company completed 21 new name sales in 1997, 86% to special libraries and 14% to academic libraries. The total number of sites at the end of 1997 was 92, including 71 in Europe, 12 in South America, 6 in Asia/Oceania, and 2 each in North America and Africa/Middle East. Of the total customer base more than 55% were academic libraries.

The company did not provide information about the available modules. One site is licensed for 200-399 users, one for 100-199, and three for 60-99. There were 56 sites supporting fewer than 15 users at the end of 1997. The rest fell in between.

The company reported sales of $1 to $2.5 million in 1997, with an after-tax profit. Twenty staff were committed to software maintenance and development at the end of 1997, seven to sales and marketing, and 10 to customer support.

The major software developments in 1997 were the release of an NT version, an integrated document requesting and delivery capability, a full-Windows system, and an updated version of the Web-based patron access catalog which integrates Z39.50.

The company maintains offices in Sheffield, England and has distributorships in Hungary, Slovakia, the Netherlands, Colombia, Lebanon, Australia. It also has an agent in Kansas City, KS.

[Fretwell-Downing Informatics Limited, Brincliffe House, 861 Ecclesall Road, Sheffield S11 7AE, South Yorkshire, England; +44 (0)114 281 6000; fax +44 (0)114 281 5981; Web Page: www.fdgroup.co.uk/fdi.

Gateway Software Corporation offers both turnkey systems and software-only for the IBM AS/400 series of minicomputers. The operating system is OS/400, the DBMS is DB2/400, and the programming language is RPG/400.

In 1997, the company sold 27 systems, including 12 new name systems (93% to school libraries and 7% to special libraries). The total number of installations at the end of 1997 was 124-all in North America.

The available core modules were in use at all sites at the end of 1997, but inventorying and interlibrary loan are used by 90%, and materials booking by just 50%. Only 29% were using GUI, and only 4% were using the Web-based OPAC interface. The product does not have acquisitions or serials control modules. There is a BiblioFile interface.

While there were 10 sites supporting fewer than 9 users and 10 supporting over 200 users at the end of 1997, the vast majority of the systems supported 16-199 users.

The company had Bales of $1-$2.5 million in 1997, and realized an after-tax profit. There were 3 staff committed to software maintenance and development at the end of 1997, 3 to sales and marketing, and 5 to customer support.

Major software developments in 1997 were the completion of GUI for all modules, and the completion of the Web-based user interface for the patron access catalog.

The company is headquartered in Montana, but has eight distributors in North America.

[Gateway Software Corporation, 10 5. Montana Avenue, Fromberg, MT 59029; (406) 668-7661; fax (406) 668-7665; Internet: gateway@imt.net; Web Page: www.gscweb.com]

Gaylord Information Systems offers two products: Galaxy and Polaris. Both are available as a turnkey system and a software-only package.

Galaxy is offered on Digital VAX and Alpha and uses the Open VMS operating system. The DBMS is proprietary and the programming language is C++.

There were 28 sales in 1997 (down from 74 in 1996), including 12 new name sales (down from 57 in 1996). The breakdown of new name sales was 60% public and 40% academic. The total number of installations at the end of 1997 was 337-all in North America, including 75% public, 15% academic, 4% special and 6% school libraries. One site discontinued use of the system.

Nearly all sites were using local cataloging, circulation, and the patron access catalog at the end of 1997, but only 14% used acquisitions and 10% used serials control-unusually low figures.

The percentage for all other modules was approximately 15% each. GUI is available for all modules, and a Web-based user interface for the patron access catalog. OCLC, RLIN, and WLN interfaces are supported, as is an interface to SuperCAT, its own CD-ROM-based cataloging support system. Z39.50 client/server is supported.

The vast majority of installed systems supported 99-156 users at the end of 1997. There were over 100 sites supporting fewer than 15 users, however, and two supporting over 400, two supporting 20-399, and six supporting 100-199.

Major software developments in 1997 were GUIs for circulation and the patron access catalog.

Polaris was introduced in 1997. It runs under the Windows NT operating system on Digital Alpha and Intel platforms. The DBMS is part SQL and part proprietary. The programming languages are C++, Visual BASIC, and Visual C.

There were three new name sales in 1997, one had been installed by the end of the year. Two of the sales were to public libraries and one to a consortium of public and academic libraries.

All core modules are available and were in use at the one installed site at the end of 1997. Also in use were inventorying, ILL, and GUI for all modules. A Web-based user interface to the patron access catalog is also available and was in use at the one site. Not available are materials booking, journal citation files, I&R, imaging, or EDIFACT support. An OCLC interface is available and was in use at the end of 1997, as was Z39.50 client/server.

Two of the systems will support 200-300 users; one will support 100-199 users.

The company reported sales of $10 to 15 million for 1997, and an after-tax profit. There were 24 software maintenance and development staff for both products, 31 sales and marketing staff, and 34 customer support staff (down from 40 in 1996).

In addition to its headquarters in Syracuse, Gaylord maintains offices in Salt Lake City, Williamsport (PA), Highland Heights (OH), Lenexa (KS), Atlanta, Houston, and Quebec.

[Gaylord Information Systems, P.O. Box 4901, Syracuse, NY 13221-4901; (315) 457-5070 or (800) 272-3414; fax (315) 457-5883; Web Page: www.gaylord.com.]

Geac Computers Inc. offers its U.S. customers both turnkey and software-only systems for two products: Advance Integrated Library Systems (which replaced the GLIS System); and PLUS Integrated Library System (formerly CLSI LIBS 100Plus). It also offers its European customers the VUBIS Integrated Library System. All three products are available both as turnkey systems and as software only. Geac continues to maintain and support (but not actively sell or develop) both the GLIS and LIBS 100 systems.

ADVANCE uses UNIX and is capable of running on a variety of hardware platforms, including DEC Alpha, Motorola Power PC, and Sun. The DBMS is UniVerse. BASIC, SQL, C and C++ are the programming languages.

The company reported 24 ADVANCE system sales in 1997 (down from 44 in 1996), 16 of which were new name sales (down from 34 in 1996). Half of the new name sales were to special libraries, 38% to public, and 13% to academic libraries. The total installed base at the end of 1997 was 273. No geographic breakdown was given. The distribution of the entire customer base is significantly different from recent sales, with 40% in academic libraries, 25% in public, 30% in special, and 3% in school libraries.

All Customers were using local cataloging, circulation, and the patron access catalog at the end of 1997. Eighty percent were using acquisitions and serials control, and 60% were using inventorying. Also available are materials booking and journal citation files (each used by 25t of customers), and information & referral (used by 10%). Twenty percent had GUI for technical services and 30% had the Web-based patron access catalog. Sixty percent had EDIFACT, and 70% were using Z39.50. OCLC, RLIN, and BiblioFile interfaces are also available.

Most of the systems were supporting between 10-99 users at the end of 1997,. but there was one system that supported over 400 users, six with 200-399, and 18 with 100-199 users. There were 34 supporting fewer than 9 users.

Major software enhancements for 1997 included the ability for patrons to view their own records and patron placement and cancellations of holds, renewals, and interlibrary loan requests. MARC holdings support was also included.

PLUS, is offered on Sun, IBM, and Motorola PowerPC hardware platforms using the UNIX operating system, the Informix DBMS, and it is written in ANSI-standard C and SQL.

There were 24 system sales in 1997 (up from 22 in 1996), including 14 new name sales (up from three in 1996). The total installed base was 124 worldwide as five sites discontinued use of the system. A geographical breakdown was not reported. The breakdown by type of library for the new name sales was 86% public and 7% each academic and special; but the total customer base was 65% public, 20% academic, 5% special, and 10% school at the end of 1997.

All sites were using cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog at the end of 1997, but only 45% were using acquisitions and only 10% were using serials control. ILL was being used by 30%, I&R by 20%, and journal citation files by 10%. Ten percent each were using the GUI and Web-based patron access catalog, and only 3% were using the technical services GUIs. Z39.50 client/ server was implemented on 70% of systems, but EDIFACT online ordering on only 10%. There are interfaces for OCLC and BiblioFile. Not available in 1997 were inventorying, materials booking, and imaging.

The vast majority of installations supported 30-199 users at the end of 1997. Only 10 supported 29 or fewer, and 27 supported more than 20 users-including 10 sites which supported over 400 users. Major software developments in 1997 were new patron access features such as the ability for patrons to view their own redords, patron placement and cancellation of holds, patron renewal, and patron ILL requests. MARC holdings support was also added.

VUBIS is available on Sun and IBM platforms. In addition, it is available on Compaq. The operating systems include UNIX, VMS, DOS, and Novell. The DBMS is "M" and the programming language is "M" "M" is the most recent name for MUMPS, a DBMS and programming language developed in the 1970s specifically for medical records management.

There were 33 sales in 1997 (down from 43 in 1996), including 29 new name sales (down from 39 in 1996), 72% of them to public libraries, 17% to special, and 10% to school libraries. The total installed base was 297 systems at the end of 1997-all in Europe. The total customer base included only 7% academic libraries at the end of 1997.

All of the sites were using cataloging, circulation, and materials booking at the end of 1997, but only 30% were using acquisitions and 20% were using serials control. Approximately 20% each were using the GUI and Web-based OPAC; a comparable percentage were using Z39.50. The major bibliographic support interface is PICA-a European bibliographic utility. Interlibrary loan, journal citation files, I&R, and imaging are not available, nor is EDIFACT support. There is no GUI available for staff modules.

VUBIS systems tend to be small, with 242 of the sites supporting 15 or fewer users at the end of 1997. Only 1 site had over 400 users, 2 from 200-399, and 4 from 100-199. The rest were in the mid-range from 16-99 users.

The major software enhancements were the introduction of VUBIS for Windows and the linking of a self-check station to the system. A link to Swets's current contents service was also introduced.

The company did not disclose revenue figures for its divisions, but based on the percentage of the company which the library division is said to represent, revenues were likely in excess of $50 million in 1997. The library division did realize an after-tax profit. There were 65 persons committed to the maintenance and development of all of the software products at the end of 1997. There also were 45 staff committed to sales and marketing and 180 to customer support.

In addition to its world headquarters in Markham, Ontario, Geac has offices in Westborough (MA) and Schaumburg (IL) in the U.S., and in Australia, Belgium, France, The Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom.

[Geac Computers Inc., P.O. Box 5150, 9 Technology Drive, Westborough, MA 01581-5150; (800) 825-2574 or (508) 871-6800; fax: (508) 871-6850 or (800) 759-0126; Web Page: www.geac.com; or Geac Computers Ltd., Suite 300, 11 Allstate Parkway, Markham, Ontario, L3R 1B3 Canada; (416) 475-0525; fax (416) 475-3847.]

Information Dimensions offers a software-only product, known as TECHLIBplus, almost exclusively to special libraries. The product runs on IBM, HP, Sun, and NT hardware platforms. The operating systems are UNIX and NT. BASISp1us is the database management software, and the applications are written in Assembler, C, C++, and Visual BASIC.

The company sold 22 systems in 1996-12 were new name sales, all to special libraries. During the year, 10 sites discontinued use of the system, however, much of that was the result of consolidation of multiple systems as the result of corporate mergers. The total number of installations at the end of 1997 was 248 worldwide, including 107 in North America; 126 in Europe, 13 in Asia/Oceania; and two in Africa/Middle East.

All of the core modules are available. Also available are ILL, journal citation files, and imaging. Both GUI and Web-based patron access catalog interfaces are available, but not staff GUIs. OCLC, RLIN, BiblioFile, and Marcive interfaces are offered. There also is Z39.50 client/server support. The company does not offer inventorying, materials booking, or information & referral, nor does it support EDIFACT online ordering and claiming. Almost all sites were using cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog at the end of 1997, but only 50% were using acquisitions and 75% were using serials control.

Interlibrary loan was used by 25%, journal citation files by 30%, and imaging by 8%. The GUI patron access catalog was used by 20%, and the Web-based patron access catalog interface was used by 50%-the highest in the industry. Only 1% were using the Z39.50 server, and 10% the Z39.50 client.

The company estimates that 55 of the sites supported fewer than 15 users at the end of 1997. In contrast, 15 supported over 400, 25 supported 200-399, and 42 supported 100-199. The rest supported from 15-99 users.

The company reported sales of $20 to $25 million in 1997, and an after-tax profit. There were 20 staff committed to software maintenance and enhancement at the end of 1997, 15 to sales and marketing (plus an undisclosed number of distributors), and 12 to customer support.

The major software enhancements in 1997 were support for multiple database query and morphological indexing. Also browser options for cataloging and circulation were introduced. The company maintains offices in Dublin (OH), Washington, New York, San Francisco, London, Paris, Frankfurt, and Stockholm.

[Information Dimensions, Inc., 8050 Tuttle Crossing Blvd., Dublin, OH 43016-3569; (614) 761-7228; fax (614) 761-7290; Web Page: www.information-dimensions.com]

Innovative Interfaces, Inc. offers both turnkey systems and software-only packages. The product, known as Innopac, is evolving into Innopac Millennium as JAVA is being used to support "thin clients" or diskless PCs. The hardware is Digital, IBM, HP, or Sun; the operating system is UNIX, and the programming language is C.

The company sold 169 systems in 1997 (up from 93 in 1996), including 87 new name sales (up from 45 in 1996). Twenty percent of the new name sales were to public, 70% to academic, and 10% to special libraries. The total number of installed systems at the end of the year was 744, including 587 in North America, 99 in Europe, 57 in Asia/Oceania, and seven in Africa/the Middle East. The installed base included a number of SLS sites in Europe as III purchased that company last year.

Almost all sites were using the core modules at the end of 1997, including acquisitions and serials control-modules which are used by a minority of most libraries using other systems. Over 15% were using GUI for staff modules, and 50% each were using GUI patron access catalog and Web-based patron access catalog. Thirty percent had implemented Z39.50 client/server.

Interlibrary loan, materials booking, journal citation files, I&R, and imaging are available; GUI is available for all modules. Interfaces to OCLC, RLIN, WLN, and BiblioFile are offered. EDIFACT online ordering and claiming are not available.

Many of the small systems are SLS sites in Europe. The majority of the systems are mid-size. There were 448 sites which had from 15-99 users at the end of 1997, 11 sites supporting over 400 users, 53 with 200-399 users, and 102 with 100-199 users.

The company reported revenues of $60-$70 million in 1997, and an after-tax profit. There were 42 staff committed to software maintenance and development at the end of 1997, 32 to sales and marketing, and 105 to customer support.

The major software developments in 1997 were the continued evolution of the product to client/server architecture using JAVA. The initial emphasis has been on the patron access catalog and management information.

The company maintains offices in Brisbane, Australia; Bristol, England; Taipei; Stockholm, Madrid, Lisbon, and Bangkok in addition to its California office in Emeryville.

[Innovative Interfaces, Inc., 5850 Shellmound Street, Emeryville, CA 94608; (800) 444-2344 or (510) 655-6200; fax (510) 450-6350; Internet: sales@iii.com; Web Page: www.iii.com.]

International Library Systems, Corp. (ILS) offers its SydneyPLUS Library Management System as software-only for both PC-based and multi-user systems. The hardware platforms are IBM PCs and compatibles, Novell LANs, DEC Alpha, Sun, and H-P. The operating systems are MS-DOS 6.1, Windows 3.1, Windows 95, and several versions of UNIX. The DBMS options are Faircom, C-tree, and Oracle. Programs are written in C and C++.

The company reported 50 sales in 1997, 30 of which were new name sales-almost all to special libraries. The total number of installed systems at the end of 1997 was well over 500, including over 400 in North America and over 100 in Europe.

Almost all sites were using cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog at the end of 1997. Some 60% were using acquisitions and 70% were using serials control. Imaging was used by 20%, and ILL and materials booking were used by 10% each. Seventy-five percent were using the GUI patron access catalog, and 25% had Web-based patron access catalog interfaces. Inventorying, journal citation files, and information & referral are not offered. GUI and Web-based patron access catalog are offered, but no GUI for staff modules. OCLC. RLIN, and Marcive interfaces are available. Z39.50 client/server is not supported, nor is EDIFACT online ordering and claiming.

The company was unable to provide data about the number of users its systems supported as the licenses are all unlimited (in 1996 the company estimated that a vast majority of sites were supporting 6-99 users).

Revenues were in the $2.5 to $5 million range in 1997, and the company realized an after-tax profit. A staff of 18 was committed to software maintenance and development, 10 to sales and marketing, and 9 to customer support.

The major software development in 1997 was the introduction of an NT version of the product. The company maintains its headquarters offices in Richmond, BC, with sales offices in Los Angeles and the United Kingdom.

[International Library Systems, Corp., Suite 1135 - 13560 Maycrest Way, Richmond, British Columbia, Canada V6V 2J7; (604) 278-6717 fax (604) 278-9161; Internet sales@ils.ca; Web Page: www.ils.ca]

Keystone Systems, Inc. offers KLAS as either a turnkey system or software-only. The primary hardware platforms are Sun, IBM and Compaq using the UNIX, AIX, Solaris, and Windows NT operating systems. The DBMS and programming language are Progress, a fourth generation relational database manager.

The company sold seven systems in 1997-six of them new name sales. All of the sales were to special libraries. The total number of installations at the end of the year was 16, all in North America; 12 were in special libraries and four were in academic libraries.

Over two-thirds of the sites were using the cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog modules at the end of 1997, but only 6% were using acquisitions. Serials control was in use by 62% of the sites, inventorying at all, and materials booking at 12%. Only 6% of the sites were using the GUI and Web-based interfaces. Not offered are ILL, journal citation files, I&R, and imaging. OCLC, RLIN, WLN, and BiblioFile interfaces are offered. Z39.50 client/server is not supported, nor is EDIFACT online ordering and claiming.

The company reported revenues under $1 million for 1997 and an after-tax profit. A staff of S was committed to software maintenance/development; 2 to marketing and sales, and 4 to customer support.

The major software development in 1997 was the introduction of GUI for all modules.

[Keystone Systems, Inc., 4513 Creedmoor Road, Suite 301, Raleigh, NC 27612; (919) 782-1143 or (800) 222-9711; Internet: sales@klas.com.]

NSC, Inc. offers its product as both a turnkey system and software-only package. The product, known as AARCS, uses IBM AS/400 or the AS/400 Advanced Series (Server Model) hardware. The operating system is OS/400, and it is written in RPG/400, Visual BASIC, and C. The company reported one new name system sale in 1997-a school library. The total customer base was 43 at the end of the year, all in North America. Two sites discontinued use of the system in 1997. The installed base at the end of 1997 was 50% in public libraries, 30% in academic, 15% school, and 5% special libraries.

At the end of 1997 all sites were using all of the core modules, and inventorying, ILL, materials booking, and information & referral. Acquisitions and serials control modules were used by only 10% of sites. Approximately 20% of the sites were using the GUI and Web-based interfaces, and 20% were using Z39.50. Imaging is not offered. OCLC and BiblioFile interfaces are available, as ois Z39.50 support. EDIFACT online ordering and claiming are not offered. GUI is available for all modules, and a Web-based patron access catalog interface is available.

The systems tend to be small, with 23 of the systems supporting fewer than 15 users at the end of 1997, and the rest supporting 16-59 users.

Sales were under $1 million in 1997 with an after-tax profit. There was a staff of 3 committed to software maintenance and development, 1 to marketing and sales, and 2 to customer support.

The major software development in 1997 was the introduction of the Web-based patron access catalog.

[NSC, Inc., 428 West Ryan St., Brillion, WI 54110; (800) 624-5720; fax (414) 756- 2359; Web Page: www.nsc-inc.com]

Sirsi Corporation offers both turnkey systems and software-only packages with its Unicorn Collection Management System for IBM, HP, Sun, DEC, and other UNIX platforms. There is a slightly different version marketed to federal libraries as STILAS. The operating system is UNIX, the database management system is BRS/ Search or Informix, and the programming languages are C and C++. An NT version was recently introduced.

Sirsi reported that it sold 155 systems during 1997-128 of which were new name sales. (The figures for 1996 were 109 and 101, thus, the company experienced a dramatic increase in sales.) Approximately 19% of the 1997 new name sales were to public, 30% to academic, 44% to special, and 7% to school libraries. The total number of installed systems at the end of 1997 was 769, including 648 in North America, 96 in Europe, 19 in Asia/Oceania, five in South America, and one in Africa/Middle East. The composition of the installed base at the end of 1997 differed from recent sales in that 31% were school libraries and public and academic libraries were only 11% and 24%, respectively.

All sites had cataloging, circulation, inventorying, ILL, I&R, imaging, and Z39.50 client/server at the end of 1997. Acquisitions was installed at 67% of sites, serials control at 5% (the lowest percentage of any vendor), materials booking and journal citation files at 20% each. Sixty percent were using GUI for all modules, and 38% had the Web-based patron access catalog interface. There are interfaces for OCLC, RLW, WLN, BiblioFile, and LaserCat. Z39.50 support is offered, as is EDIFACT online ordering.

The majority of sites are small: 445 sites supported fewer than 30 users at the end of 1997. However, there were 19 sites supporting over 400 users, 26 supporting 200-299, and 24 supporting 100-199. The rest supported 30-99 users. The company did not reveal its 1997 revenues, but did claim an after-tax profit. We estimate revenues at $25 million. A staff of 30 was committed to software development and maintenance, 32 to sales and marketing, and 81 to customer support.

Major software developments in 1997 included "WorkFlows," a staff interface designed to tailor a graphical client to specific staff tasks, online access to photographic and video collections, and an outreach module.

The company maintains offices in Huntsville, Chicago, San Diego, and Sandy (Utah); and Ottawa, Melbourne, Riyadh, and London.

[Sirsi Corporation, 689 Discovery Dr., Huntsville, AL 35806; (205) 922-9818; fax (205) 922-9818; Internet sales@sirsi. com; Web Page: www.sirsi.com]

Sisis Informationssysteme, a company formed by combining the Siemens Nixdorf Library Division and SOFTCON, offers its Sisis integrated library system as both a turnkey system and as software-only. It is offered as a multi-user system on Siemens Nixdorf RM200, RM400 and RM600 (MIPS-RISC processors) platforms; using the SINIX 5.4 operating system (SINIX is the UNIX-operating system of Siemens-Nixdorf, based on UNIX V.4); the Informix-online (ONL) /standard engine (SE) and Oracle DBMS; and written in C and C++.

The company reported 35 system sales in 1997 (up from 25 in 1996), 29 of which were new name sales (up from 15 in 1996). Approximately 62% of the new name sales were to public, 7% to academic, and 31% to special libraries. The total number of installed sites at the end of 1997 was 400, all in Europe. Two sites discontinued use of the system in 1997.

Cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog modules were in use by almost all of the sites at the end of 1997, but only 70% were using acquisitions and 60% were using serials control. Inventorying was used by 70% and ILL by 20%. The GUI patron access catalog was in use by 30% of the sites, and Web-based OPAC interfaces by 15%. Z39.50 was used by fewer than 5% of the sites. Materials booking, journal citation files, information & referral, and imaging are not offered, nor is GUI for staff modules. The only cataloging support interface offered is MAB/MARC. Z39.50 support is offered, but not EDIFACT conformity.

The systems tend to be small to mid-size, with 15 supporting fewer than 15 users and none supporting more than 99 at the end of 1997.

The company reported revenues of $10 to $15 million in 1997 and no after-tax profit. There were 20 staff committed to software maintenance and development at the end of 1997, but the company entered into a strategic alliance with PICA of The Netherlands and ASLi of the United Kingdom in 1997 to share technology. There were 6 staff committed to sales and marketing at the end of 1997, and 4 to customer support.

The major software development in 1997 was the completion of a JAVA-based patron access catalog.

The company maintains offices in Berlin, Hamburg, and Stuttgart.

[Sisis Informationssysteme GmbH, Grunwalder Weg, 82041 Oberhaching, Germany; +49 89 67308-326; fax +49 8967308-399; Web Page: www.sisis.de]

Stowe Computing Australia offers its Book Plus product both as a software-only package and a turnkey system running on the IBM AS/400 hardware platform using the IBM OS/400 operating system. The DBMS is DB2/400 and the programming language is RPG/400.

The company sold five systems in 1997-three were new name sales-all to public libraries. The total installed customer base at the end of the year was 116, including 30 in Europe, 80 in Asia/ Oceania, and six in Africa/Middle East. The installed base consisted of 60% public, 10% academic, and 20% special libraries at the end of 1997.

All of the sites were using cataloging, circulation, patron access catalog, and interlibrary loan modules at the end of 1997. Over 95% were using acquisitions and serials control, and 90% were using journal citation files and inventorying. Seventy percent were using I&R, but only 20% were using imaging. The GUI patron access catalog was used by 30%, but only 10% were using staff GUIs. Only 10% were using Z39.50 and EDIFACT online ordering. There is no Web-based patron access catalog. Interfaces are offered to ABN and BiblioFile. Z39.50 client/server is available, as is EDIFACT online ordering.

The two largest systems supported 200-399 users at the end of 1997, 10 supported 100-199, and 40 supported 60-99 users. The rest supported 6-59 users. The company reported 1997 revenues of under $1 million, and it realized an after-tax profit. There were 14 staff committed to software maintenance and development, 3 to marketing and sales, and 7 to customer support.

The company maintains offices in Adelaide, Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, Auckland, and London; agents are in Johannesburg, Paris, and Zurich.

[Stowe Computing Australia, 208 Greenhill Road, Eastwood, South Australia 5063; +61 8 372 6111; fax +61 8 372 6199; Web Page: stowe.com.au]

VTLS, Inc. offers both turnkey systems and software packages. There are two products, Classic VTLS and Virtua, a client/server product introduced in 1997.

Classic VTLS uses Hewlett-Packard 3000 Series, RISC architecture computers under the MPE/IX operating system; HP 9000 Series RISC architecture, under the HP-UX operating system; IBM RS/6000 RISC architecture computers under the AIX operating system; the DEC Alpha RISC architecture computers under the Digital UNIX operating system; and the Sun Sparc series under the SunOS operating system. The software is written in C and COBOL; the DBMS is Oracle (IBM), Image (MPE), or Allbase (HP) depending on the hardware.

The company reported 36 Classic VTLS sales in 1997 (down from 41 in 1996), six of which were new name sales (down from 22 in 1996). The distribution of the new name sales was 16% to public, 32% to academic, and 52% to special libraries. The customer base at the end of 1997 was 296, including 110 in North America, 107 in Europe, 39 in Asia/ Oceania, 17 in South America, and 23 in Africa/Middle East. Two sites discontinued use of VTLS in 1997.

All sites were using cataloging, circulation, and patron access catalog at the end of 1997, but only 47% were using acquisitions. Eighty-seven percent were using serials control, 46 had I&R, 28% had inventorying, 17% had ILL, and 8% had journal citation files. Over 47% had imaging-the highest percentage in the industry. Some 40% were using the GUIs, and over 26% had the Web-based patron access catalog interface. Only 6% were using the Z39.50 server, but 33% used the client. Interfaces are offered to OCLC, RLIN, WLN, and BiblioFile. Z39.50 is supported, but not EDIFACT online ordering and claiming.

There were many large systems at the end of 1997, including 25 supporting 400+ users, 41 supporting 200-399 users, and 38 supporting 100-199 users. Only 26 supported fewer than 9 users. The rest supported from 10-99 users.

Virtua, a client/server system, runs on Hewlett-Packard 9000 series, IBM RS/6000 series, Digital Alpha series, and Sun Sparc series servers using various versions of the UNIX operating system. The staff clients require a Windows 95 or NT platform. The DBMS is Oracle and the programming languages are C and C++.

The company sold 18 Virtua systems in 1997, 12 to new accounts. Fifty-eight percent were to special libraries, 37% to academic, and 5% to public libraries. None of the systems had been accepted by year-end.

All of the purchasers have chosen cataloging, circulation, and the patron access catalog. Only 67% have contracted for acquisitions and serials control (both still in development). I&R has been selected by 87%, imaging by 32%, and ILL and materials booking by 22%. All will be receiving GUI for all modules, and 89% will receive the Web-based OPAC interface. OCLC and RYAN interfaces have been contracted. All sites will have Z39.50 support and EDIFACT online ordering and claiming.

No information was provided about the number of concurrent users to be supported by the Virtua systems.

The company reported revenues in the range of $5-$10 million, with an after-tax profit. The company said that revenues were up 32% from the previous year. A staff of 44 was committed to software maintenance and development for both products at the end of 1997 (up from 35 in 1996), 30 to sales and marketing (plus 18 agents worldwide), and 23 to customer support.

The major software development effort in 1997 was directed to Virtua, the next-generation VTLS system. The cataloging, circulation and patron access catalog modules were completed. A major enhancement to the existing product was Year 2000 compliance.

In addition to Blacksburg, VTLS maintains offices in Barcelona, Helsinki, Cracow, and New Delhi.

[VTLS, Inc., 1800 Kraft Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060; (800) 468-8857 or (540) 557-1200; fax (540) 557-1210; Internet: askvtls@vtls.com; Web: www.vtls.com]

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View Citation
Publication Year:1998
Type of Material:Article
Language English
Published in: Library Systems Newsletter
Publication Info:Volume 18 Number 3-4
Issue:March / April 1998
Page(s):17-32
Publisher:American Library Association
Place of Publication:Chicago, IL
Notes:Howard S. White, Editor-in-Chief; Richard W. Boss, Contributing Editor
Company: Advanced Computer Concepts
epixtech, inc.
Ameritech Library Services
BLCMP Library Services
CARL Corporation
Data Research Associates, Inc.
ELiAS N.V.
Endeavor Information Systems, Inc.
EOS International
Ex Libris
Fretwell-Downing Informatics
Gateway Software Corporation
Gaylord Information Systems
Geac
Information Dimensions, Inc.
Open Text Corporation
Innovative Interfaces, Inc.
International Library Systems Corporation
Keystone Systems, Inc.
NSC, Inc.
SIRSI Corporation
Sisis Informationssysteme
Stowe Computing Australia
VTLS, Inc.
GIS Information Systems
Products: FLEXLIB
Horizon
Dynix
TALIS
Carl
DRA
MultiLIS
Taos
Extended Library Access Solutions
Voyager
T Series
Q Series
ALEPH 500
OLIB
Galaxy
Polaris
Advance
PLUS
VUBIS
TECHLIBplus
INNOPAC
Millennium
SydneyPlus Library Management
KLAS
AARCS
Unicorn
SISIS
Book Plus
Virtua
VTLS
Subject: Library automation systems -- directories
ISSN:0277-0288
Record Number:5729
Last Update:2021-11-17 12:27:41
Date Created:0000-00-00 00:00:00