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Annual survey of PC- and Mac-based library system vendors

Library Systems Newsletter [May 1997]

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Each year Library Systems Newsletter surveys the library automation industry to get an overview of the market and to facilitate comparison among vendors. The March and April double issue described the vendors of multi-user systems using UNIX and other powerful operating systems. This issue is devoted to the vendors of PC- and Macintosh-based multi-function systems (those using Windows, Windows NT, DOS, or Mac operating systems to support at least three fully integrated modules, including either circulation or patron access catalog). Not included are vendors offering only a single module such as acquisitions, serials control, or cataloging; or only two modules such as cataloging or a union database and interlibrary loan.

Five of the vendors included in this issue offer only software packages. The remaining vendors offer some sort of turnkey system as well as software only. While we have always defined "turnkey" as providing hardware, software, installation, training, and ongoing support from a single source, clearly many vendors of PC- and Mac-based products do not regard installation and on-site training as part of their definition. The cost of such services could put those vendors' products out of reach of many libraries. Therefore, we have termed the more limited scope of offering hardware and software, but not installation or on-site training, "bundled" products.

Like the multi-user systems detailed in the March and April double issue many vendors of PC- and Mac-based systems have enhanced capabilities. In addition to the basic modules-online catalog, cataloging, and circulation- many of these systems include other modules as well, including acquisitions, serials control, interlibrary loan, materials booking, etc.

This survey uses the same methodology employed in previous years. Vendors were contacted by mail, with follow-up by telephone and fax as necessary. Our queries focused on whether the product was available bundled with hardware, software-only, or both; hardware platform, operating system, and programming language(s); number of sales during 1996; total number of installations; profitability; percentage of customers using each module or major function; and number of staff devoted to software maintenance/ development, sales and marketing, and customer support. Major software enhancements reported by the vendors also are included.

We asked that the vendors report the number of "units" (individual computer workstations) licensed to use the software, rather than the number of "systems." Some vendors either ignored our request or lacked the data. We have endeavored to distinguish among sales of units, systems, software packages, sites, and customers when reporting data.

SUMMARY

This survey includes 14 companies in the U.S. and Canada marketing PC- or Mac-based library automation products. There are other companies besides but these 14 companies comprise a large percentage of all the systems sold during 1996. All but five of the vendors offer either a bundled product or will sell the software package alone. Because of the proliferation of computer equipment already installed in libraries, even the vendors that offer bundled products realize most of their revenue from "software-only" sales.

The respondents reported a combined total of 15,932 units sold in 1996, down from the 21,591 reported by the same vendors in 1995. Some 1,200 of the drop is explained by a change in the definition for a system's inclusion in this survey. This total probably represents 90t of all sales of PC- and Mac-based library applications software. These figures include adjustments for vendors that reported number of "systems," rather than number of "units

The total market for this type of product was approximately $115 million in 1996. Follett is the only vendor that reported gross sales of over $30 million; Winnebago reported gross sales of $25 to $30 million; The Library Corporation reported $10 to $15 million in sales; VTLS reported gross sales of $5 to $10 million (apparently included revenue from the sale of multi-user operating system products; we estimate that under $1 million is a more accurate figure for sales of its micro-based system). Nichols Advanced Technologies and Soutron Ltd. reported sales of $2.5 to $5 million each. CASPR and SIRS each reported sales of $1 to $2.5 million. The other vendors either reported sales of under $1 million or failed to report this information.

Table 1 ranks the vendors by the number of new units sold in 1996, as reported by the vendors themselves. Table 2 ranks the total number of installed and accepted units, of the vendors reporting at least 400 sales to date. Table 3 shows the number of staff devoted to software maintenance and development; Table 4, the number of staff devoted to sales and marketing; and Table 5, the number of staff devoted to other customer service.


Table 1. Number of Units Sold in 1996
Vendor No. of Units Sold
Winnebago 7,000
Follett 5,138
Nichols Advanced Technology 1,168
CASPR 552*
EOS International 521*
SIRS, Inc. 268*
No other vendor reported sales of more than 250 units in 1996.
* The vendor reported "system" sales.


Table 2. Total Number of Installed and Accepted Units
VendorNo. of Installed Units
Follett 31,449
Winnebago 27,725
Nichols 3,556
CASPR 2,218*
EOS International 1,753*
SIRS, Inc. 1,419*
No other vendor reported more than 400 units installed at the end of 1996

Industry wide, the total number of installed units is over 100,000.

* The vendor reported the number of installed "systems."



Table 3. Staff Devoted to Software Maintenance and Development
VendorNo. of Software Maintenance/
Development Staff
Winnebago 50
Follett 37
The Library Corporation 35
Nichols 18
EOS International 15
SIRS, Inc. 15
Soutron Ltd. 12
Brodart 11
No other vendor reported more than 5 staff devoted to software maintenance and development at the end of 1996.


Table 4. Staff Devoted to Sales and Marketing
Vendor No. of Sales and
Marketing Staff
Follett 79
Winnebago 75
SIRS, Inc. 53
Brodart 19
EOS International 17
The Library Corporation14
Soutron Ltd. 10
Nichols 9
No other vendor reported more than .5 staff devoted to sales and marketing.


Table 5. Staff Devoted to Other Customer Support
Vendor No. of Other
Customer Support Staff
Follett 67
Winnebago50
SIRS, Inc. 25
Brodart 20
The Library Corporation20
Nichols 18
EOS International 14
Soutron Ltd. 12
No other vendor reported more than 5 staff devoted to customer support.

VENDOR REPORTS

The vendor reports are arranged alphabetically and are based on information furnished by the vendors themselves.

Brodart Automation sells four products: LePac, Precision One Cataloging System, Precision One Integrated System, and Media Minder. LePac and the Precision One Cataloging System fail outside the scope of this survey. Brodart sells both bundled systems and software-only, but recommends that hardware be purchased locally. Toll-free customer service is provided. Enhancements are released as necessary, usually once a year for Media Minder and twice a year for the Precision One Integrated System.

The Precision One Integrated System runs on IBM PCs or compatibles with DOS 5.0+, though a Windows version is expected to be released in the next two years. The DBMS is proprietary; and the software is written in "C "_ "C++)' and Assembly. The system is available in either a standalone or LAN version. The LAN version of the software sets no maximum number of concurrent users. The bibliographic record database is limited to 4 GE, with each bibliographic record limited to 20 KB. The system can import, edit, store, and export full-MARC bibliographic records.

The Precision One Integrated System product was sold to 80 customers in 1996. A total of 10 networked/70 standalone systems were being supported at year's end-all in North America (60% public libraries, 38% school, and 1% each academic and special libraries). All of the sites were using local cataloging, OPAC, and interlibrary loan modules; 90% were using (each) circulation and inventorying. A CD-ROM interface was at all sites; 90% each had a LAN interface and a Precision One Cataloging System interface; and 10% each had OCLC and BiblioFile interfaces.

The company had nine staff committed to software development and maintenance, 11 to marketing and sales, and 15 to customer support. The software enhancements for 1996 were enhanced bookmobile options and the availability of a slip printer.

Media Minder runs on DOS-based IBM-compatible FCs. Btrieve is the DBMS and Turbo Pascal is the programming language. It is available in either a standalone or LAN version. In the networked version, the number of users is limited only by the size of the network. Bibliographic database and record size is limited only by the size of the hard drive. The system can import and export MARC records, but records are not stored in MARC format.

Ten Media Minder packages were sold in 1996, bringing the total number of installed and accepted systems to 200 standalone/40 networked systems-all in North America (70% in school libraries 20% in special libraries, and 10% in academic libraries). All, sites were using online patron access catalog (OPAC), authority control, local cataloging, inventorying, materials booking, and report generator modules; and a LAN interface. The company had two staff committed to Media Minder software development and maintenance eight to marketing and sales, and five to customer support. Major software enhancements during 1996 included override abilities, additional check-in options, and more convenient database access.

The company declined to disclose revenues or profitability for any product, or company-wide. Brodart maintains offices in Williamsport (PA) and Brantford (Ontario).

[Brodart Automation, 500 Arch Street Williamsport, PA 17705; (800) 233-8467 ext. 640; fax (717) 327-9237; salesmkt@ brodart.com; http://www.brodart.com.]

CASPR Library Systems, Inc. offers its LibraryWorks as a software-only product which runs on Macintosh or IBM PCs using Mac OS, Windows 3.1, Windows 95 or Windows NT operating systems. The DBMS used is the MARC Database Engine (MDE), and the programming languages are "C" and "C++." The software is available for either a standalone system, or in a LAN version. For the LAN version, the number of concurrent users is limited only by the size and speed of the network being used; the maximum database size is 8 million catalog records and 8 million patron records. The system can import, store, and export full-MARC bibliographic records.

The company reported sales of 552 software packages in 1996. Cumulative totals were 920 standalone/1,298 networked systems installed and accepted: 902/1,181 in North America, 10/8 in Asia/Oceana, 5/6 in Europe, and 5/1 in Africa/the Middle East (70% school, 20% special, 7% academic, and 3% public libraries). All sites were using acquisitions, serials control, local cataloging, authority control, circulation, OPAC, interlibrary loan, materials booking, report generator, journal citation files, inventory control, GUI OPAC, and GUI technical services; and 14% had a Web OPAC. All sites were capable of utilizing OCLC, RLIN, UTLAS, WLN, BiblioFile, CD-ROM, and LAN interfaces.

Gross sales were between $1. and $2.5 million, with an after-tax profit. The company declined to report the number of staff, stating it is "confidential." Major software enhancements reported include LibraryNet and a Web Library Server.

[CASPR, Inc. , 100 Park Center Plaza, Suite 500, San Jose, CA 95113; (800) 852-2777 or (408) 882-0600; fax (408) 882-0608; kline@caspr.com; http://www. aspr.com.]

EOS International offers Graphical Library Automation System (GLAS), Professional Series, and Manager Series as either a bundled system or software only for PCs. These products were formerly marketed by Data Trek (which merged with IME in 1996 to form EOS International). GLAS runs on Windows 3.1+ or Windows 95, and both Professional and Manager Series run on DOS and Windows; and are all available in standalone and LAN versions. The maximum number of concurrent users on the LAN version is determined by the host network limitations. The company provides toll-free customer support. Major upgrades are released every 12 to 18 months and are free to clients with an active software support subscription. Minor updates are released "as needed" and are free of charge.

The Professional Series uses a proprietary DBMS and the "C" programming language. The maximum database size for each bibliographic, item, and patron record is 500,000; and the system can import, edit, store, and export full-MARC records.

Twenty-five bundled systems and 19 software packages were sold during 1996. At the end of year, the vendor reported that 16 standalone/360 networked systems installed and accepted: 8/351 in North America, 3/4 in Europe, 5/2 in Asia/Oceana, and 0/1 in Africa/the Middle East (56% were in special libraries, 22% in academic, 20% in public, and 2% in school libraries). Some 82% of the sites were using the local cataloging module; 68% circulation; 49% serials control; 41% GUI OPAC; 32% acquisitions; 2.6% were using the OPAC; and 2.1% the Web OPAC. Some 77% each had the capability to use OCLC, RLIN, WLN, BiblioFile, and UTLAS interfaces; and .53% each had Z39.50 client, Z39.50 server, and EDIFACT online ordering. Major software enhancements for the year included format integration to version 2.1.

The Manager Series uses dBase IV as the DBMS, and "C" and Clipper 5.2 as the programming languages. The maximum database size for bibliographic, item, and patron records is 250,000 each; and the system is capable of importing and exporting full-MARC records, but it does not store records in the full-MARC format. There were 265 bundled systems and 56 software packages sold during 1996. Total installations at the end of 1996 were 1,041 standalone/244 networked systems: 753/30 in North America, 249/210 in Europe, 31/0 in Asia/Oceana, 4/2 in South America, and 0/1 in Africa/the Middle East. Special libraries accounted for 44% of the user base; school libraries, 39%; academic libraries, 10%; and public libraries 7%. Nearly 68% of the sites were using the local cataloging module; 42% were using serials control; 27% were using acquisitions; 16% were using circulation; 13% were using GUI OPAC; nearly 10% were using report generator; 4.3% were using the OPAC; and 0.6% were using Web OPAC. Nearly 37% each had the capability to use OCLC, RLIN, WLN, BiblioFile, and UTLAS interfaces; and 0.2% had Z39.50 client, Z39.50 server, and EDIFACT online ordering. In 1996, version 7.1 of the software was released.

GLAS, new in 1996, uses the Visual Objects programming language. The maximum database size is 250,000 (each) bibliographic, item, and patron records. The system can import, edit, store, and export full-MARC bibliographic records. There were 82 bundled systems and 74 software modules sold in 1996; however, by year-end, only 40 standalone/52 networked systems had been installed and accepted: 16/26 in North America, 23/25 in Europe, and 1/0 in Africa/the Middle East (85% were special libraries, 8% academic, 5% school, and 2% public libraries). Some 87% of the sites were using the serials control module; 79% were using the local cataloging module; 51% circulation; 25% acquisitions; 16% GUI OPAC; 9% OPAC; and 1% report generator. Some 25% of the sites had the capability to use OCLC, RLIN, WLN, BiblioFile, and UTLAS interfaces.

Gross sales figures, though not reported, were probably about $15 million. The company did claim to be profitable. EOS had 15 staff in software maintenance and development, 17 in marketing and sales, and 14 in customer support. Corporate headquarters are located in Carlsbad (CA), European headquarters in London, Asia Pacific headquarters in Singapore, and offices also in Boston, Paris, and 40 other cities.

[EOS International, 5838 Edison Place, Carlsbad, CA 92008-6596; (760) 431-8400 or (800) 876-5484; fax (760) 431-8448; sales@eosintl.com; http://www.eosintl. com.]

Follett Software Company offers both bundled and software only products. A majority of Follett's customers operate on Pentium PCs, with a significant number operating on Macintosh and Apple computers. Follett creates products in both the DOS and Mac OS environments using CTree DBMS, and "C++" programming language. Toll-free customer service is provided. Enhancements are released every 12 to 18 months, as needed. Enhancements are free to customers with current support agreements; other customers must pay for upgrades. A LAN version of both the DOS and Macintosh systems is available for all products. The maximum number of concurrent users is dependent only upon Network Operating System (NOS) license agreements; the maximum database size is dependent upon the hardware. The systems can import, edit, store, and export full-MARC records. The company claims that it does not track system sales; only software package sales.

The Catalog Plus products (DOS and Mac versions) accounted for 3,013 software unit sales during 1996. The Circulation Plus product (DOS and Mac versions) accounted for 2,125 software unit sales during 1996. Overall, a total of 5,138 units sold during 1996. The total installed and accepted base was 31,449 units: predominantly in North America (93% school libraries, 3% public, 3% special, and 1% academic libraries).

The company reported gross sales revenues in the $30-$35 million range, with an after-tax profit. A staff of 37 was committed to software development and maintenance, 79 to marketing and sales, and 67 to customer support.

[Follett Software Company, 1391 Corporate Drive, McHenry, IL 60050-7041; (815) 344-8700 or (800) 323-3397; fax (815) 344-8774; http://www.fsc.follett.com; e-mail: info@fsc.follett.com]

Kelowna Software Ltd. offers Library 4 Universal (L4U) as software-only (standalone or networked-based). L4U is platform-independent, meaning that PCs and Macs can operate simultaneously on the same network. The operating systems used are Mac OS, Windows 3.1, Windows 95, and Windows NT. The DBMS is 4th Dimension; and Pascal and "C+" are the programming languages. The maximum number of concurrent users for the LAN version varies by network protocol, but is from 100 to 250. The database is limited to a maximum of 16 million records per file. The system is capable of importing, editing, storing, and exporting full-MARC bibliographic records. Enhancements are generally issued twice a year; however in the last two years, three or four updates have been released due to emerging technologies. Upgrades are automatically sent to customers who have paid the annual support fee. Toll-free customer support is provided.

The company declined to reveal the number of customers, sales volume, revenues, or staffing levels. L4U reported that 95% of its customers are school libraries, with the remaining 5% split between special and public libraries. All sites had acquisitions and GUI technical services; 95% had local cataloging; 85% each had OPAC and GUI OPAC; 75% each had authority control, circulation, and report generator; 50% had inventorying; 40% had materials booking; 25% each had serials control, electronic mail, and interlibrary loan; and 10% had journal citation files. Half of the sites each had OCLC, RLIN, and UTLAS interfaces; 60% had a LAN interface; 65% each had BiblioFile and WLN interfaces; 20% had a CD-ROM interface; and 5% had remote database searching through gateway. The product debuted in 1996; no further upgrades were released during the year.

[Kelowna Software Ltd. , 4200 - 2000 Spall Road, Kelowna, British Columbia V1Y 9P6, Canada; (800) 667-3634 or (250) 860-4123; fax (800) 787-4383 or (250) 860-4240; sales@L4U.com; http://www.L4U.com.]

The Library Corporation offers several products-BiblioFile PAC, BiblioFile Cataloging (DOS), BiblioFile Circulation (DOS), ITS for Windows, Library Solutions, and NetPAC. Only Library.Solutions fits the criteria for this survey, as it is the only product with at least three modules offered by this vendor. It is available as either a bundled system or as software-only (available only in LAN versions). Library Solutions, released in late 1996, runs on IBM or compatible PCs under the Windows NT operating system. Oracle is the DBMS, and Delphi and Visual "C++" are the programming languages. The number of concurrent users is unlimited; the maximum database size is limited only by the size of the hard drive. The software is capable of importing, editing, storing, and exporting full-MARC records. Toll-free customer support is available.

The vendor sold 20 Library Solutions systems in 1996, bringing its total installed base to 100 systems, all in North America (95% academic and 5% public libraries). All sites were using the local cataloging, authority control, circulation, inventorying, OPAC, report generator, e-mail, GUI OPAC, Web OPAC, and GUI technical services modules. All sites had BiblioFile and LAN interfaces, Z39.50 server, and Z39.50 client. Enhancements will be released "as needed," and available immediately to customers under support agreements.

For all products, the company reported gross sales in the $10 to $15 million range, with an after-tax profit. There were 35 staff committed to software maintenance/development, 14 to sales/marketing, and 20 to customer support. The company's main offices are in Inwood (WV) and Reston (VA), and sales offices are in Woodstock (GA), Folsom (CA), and Pittsburgh (PA). [The Library Corporation, Research Park, Inwood, Wi 25428-9733; (304) 229-0100; fax (304) 229-0295; info@tlcdelivers.com; http://www.tlc-delivers.com.]

Nichols Advanced Technologies, Inc. sells its Athena and MOLLI products only as software packages, in standalone and LAN versions. Both are capable of importing, editing, storing, and exporting full-MARC records. Enhancements are released at least once a year; customers paying for technical support receive enhancements free of charge. Toll-free customer support is provided.

Athena runs on PC-based (Intel) microcomputers using either Windows 3.x or higher, Macintosh System 7.0 or higher, or DOS as the operating system; a xBase and proprietary DBMS; and "C++" as the programming language. The number of concurrent users supported under the LAN version is based upon network software; the maximum database size is limited only by hard drive space. In 1996, 1,093 units were sold, bringing Athena's customer base to 455 standalone/1,5l6 networked units installed and accepted: 446/1,503 in North America, 8/12 in Asia/Oceana; and 1/1 in Europe (83% in school libraries, 7% in special and in public libraries, and 3% academic libraries). All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, circulation, inventorying, OPAC, interlibrary loan, materials booking, and report generator; 53% were using GUI OPAC; and 1% each were using acquisitions, serials control, and Web OPAC. All of the sites had OCLC, RLIN, UTLAS, WLN, and BiblioFile interfaces and 75% had a LAN interface. Major software enhancements included the release of Athena 96 with Internet modules: CD-ROM cataloging capabilities; and Z39.50 module.

MOLLI runs on PCs using DOS; xBase and a proprietary DBMS; and written in "C" and compiled dBase. The number of concurrent users for the LAN version is based upon the network software; the maximum database size is approximately 100,000 records.

Seventy-five MOLLI packages were sold during 1996. The total number of installed and accepted units was 806 standalone/779 networked units: 787/774 in North America, 18/5 in Asia/Oceana, and 1/0 in Europe (83% school libraries, 7% each public and special, and 3% academic libraries). All sites were using the local cataloging, circulation, inventorying, interlibrary loan, materials booking, and report generator; 40% OPAC; and 1% each acquisitions and serials control. All sites had OCLC, RLIN, UTLAS, WLN, and BiblioFile interfaces; 40% had a LAN interface.

The company's 1996 gross sales were between $2.5 and $5 million, with an after-tax profit. A staff of 18 was committed to software maintenance and development, nine (plus 23 sales representatives) to marketing/sales; and 18 to customer support. In addition to LaCrosse, Nichols has offices in Austin and Edmonton.

[Nichols Advanced Technologies, Inc., 3452 Losey Blvd. South, LaCrosse, WI 54601; (800) 658-9453 or (608) 787-8333; fax (608) 787-8337; or 8911 Capital of Texas Highway, Suite 2100, Austin, TX 78759; (512) 342-2850; fax (512) 342-2827; mhammer@nicholsusa. com.]

On Point, Inc. released a software-only package, known as TLC (Total Library Computerization) in May 1996. TLC runs on PCs and Macs (on cross-platform systems); the operating systems are DOS, Windows 3.1, Windows 95, or System 7; the DBMS is FileMaker Pro (Windows and Macintosh) and asksam (DOS); and the programming languages are Claris FileMaker Pro (Windows and Macintosh) and asksam (DOS). Both standalone and LAN-based versions are available. Upgrades will be issued "as needed." While the company reported the maximum number of concurrent users as "proprietary," it did report that 45% of all users were LAN-based. The maximum database size is 2 GB for each (Windows and Mac) file, and 4 GB for each (DOS) file. The system imports and converts full-MARC records to TLC's own format; since the records are altered and some of the MARC fields are not preserved, it cannot export MARC records. The number of packages sold was not disclosed. TLC is primarily installed in small, special libraries (98%), but some academic and school libraries are using the product as well.

Gross sales were under $1 million, with an after-tax profit, The company had a staff of .5 FTE committed to software maintenance and development, .5 FTE to sales and marketing'; and .5 FTE to customer support.

[On Point, Inc. , 2606 36th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20007-1419; (202) 338-8914; fax (202) 337-7107; tlc@onpoint-inc.com; http://www.onpointinc.com.

Quinte Computer Services, Ltd. Offers its Quinte Library Services only as a software package, in either a stand-alone or LAN-based version, The LAN version has no maximum number of concurrent users. Enhancements are issued annually, and are included in the price of the annual support agreement. Toll-free customer service is provided. The software runs on Intel and IBM RS/6000 hardware under DOS, UNIX, or Advanced PICK operating system, Advanced PICK DBMS, and is written in Basic. The software has an unlimited database size. The system can import, edit, store, and export full-MARC bibliographic records. Eleven software packages were sold during 1996, bringing the total customer base to 42 standalone units by year-end; all in North America (70% school libraries, 25% public, and 5% academic libraries).

The company did not disclose any financial or staffing information. All of the sites were using local cataloging, circulation, inventorying, OPAC, materials booking, and report generator modules.

[Quinte Computer Services, Ltd., 141 William Street, P.O. Box 578, Belleville, Ontario K8N 5B2 Canada; (613) 966-3070; fax (613) 966-3095; kpul@ quinte.com; http://www. quinte.com.]

SIRS, Inc. offers Mandarin as either a bundled system or software only; for either a single-user, or network-based users. The LAN version has no maximum number of concurrent users. Enhancements are issued periodically and are free to customers subscribing to the service and update agreement. Toll-free customer service is provided. Mandarin runs on IBM-compatible PCs with DOS 5.0+, Windows, Windows NT, or Novell operating systems (MACclient is also available). The DBMS is proprietary, and the software is written in "C" and "C++." The maximum database size is limited only by the capacity of the hard drive. The system can import, edit, store, and export full-MARC records.

During 1996, 268 units were sold: 20 bundled and 248 software-only. Total installations at the end of 1996 were 106 standalone/1,3l3 networked units: 101/1,313 in North America, 3/20 in Europe, 0/2 in Asia/Oceana, and 0/2 in Africa/the Middle East (85% school libraries, and 5% each public, special, and academic libraries).

SIRS claimed that gross revenues and profitability were "proprietary." (In 1995, however, its gross sales were in the $1 to $2.5 million range, with an after-tax profit, according to the vendor.) All sites were using local cataloging, circulation, inventorying, OPAC, report generator modules, and e-mail. All of the sites had a LAN interface, remote database searching through gateway, a CD-ROM interface; and Internet gateway server through Telnet. A staff of 15 was committed to software development and maintenance, 53 to sales/marketing, and 25 to customer support. The major enhancements in 1996 included (in Version 2.71) sorting in OPAC, subject cross-references, navigation keys within Enter/Modify, new Mitinet templates, improved memory management; and in Version 2.80: GUI OPAC for Windows users, whole field searching, full screen editing, combined circulation screens, OPAC sort by copyright date, and enhanced data entry features. The company has offices in Montreal and Champlain (NY), in addition to Boca Raton.

[SIRS, Inc., P.O. Box 2348, Boca Raton, FL 33427; (561) 994-0079 or (800) 232-SIRS; fax (561) 995-4065; mandarin@ sirs .com; http://www.sirs.com.]

Soutron Ltd. offers C2 either as a bundled or software-only product. C2 runs on IBM-compatible PCs under the Windows NT operating system. The DBMS is proprietary, and the code is written in "C++." In 1996, 54 units were sold, though only 22 were to new customers. The total installed base was 54 sites- one in North America; eight in Europe; and 45 in Asia/Oceana. Installations by type of library are: 45% special, 20% academic, and 20% public libraries. All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, circulation, inventorying, OPAC, report generator, community information, imaging, GUI OPAC, and GUI technical services; 80% had serials control; 75% had acquisitions, and 5% each had e-mail and Web OPAC. LAN and CD-ROM interfaces were in use at all sites; 30% each had WLN interface and Internet gateway; 15% had remote database searching through a gateway; and 5% each had Z39.50 server and Z39.50 client (multi-user and PC-based).

Gross revenue was reportedly between $2.5 and $5 million; profitability was not reported. A staff of 12 was committed to software maintenance and development; 10 to sales and marketing; and 12 to customer support.

[Soutron Ltd., Jerome House, Ilkallam Fields Road, Ilkeston, Derbyshire DE7 4BH England; 011 44 0115 94 41664; fax 011 44 0115 9441626; nick@soutron.demon.co.uk.]

Tek Data Systems Co. offers its Series M - Max-Web Max as either a bundled system or as software-only, in either a standalone or a LAN-based version. The LAN version will support a maximum of 64 concurrent users. It runs on IBM compatible PCs under the Windows 95 or UNIX operating systems, a proprietary DBMS, and is written in Polyforth. The database size is unlimited. The system can import, edit, store, and export full-MARC records.

During 1996, 50 units were sold: 30 bundled systems and 20 software-only packages. The total installed base at the end of 1996 was 302 standalone/202 networked units: 300/200 in North America and 2/2 in Europe (80% school libraries, and 20% public libraries). The company declined to disclose the modules used by its customers, or any financial or staffing data. Tek Data Systems has offices in Boston, Chicago, and San Jose.

[Tek Data Systems Co. , 1111 W. Park Avenue, Libertyville, IL 60048; (847) 367-8800; fax (847) 367-0235; tekdata@ tekdata.com; http://www.tekdata.com.]

VTLS, Inc. offers Micro-VTLS, as either a bundled or a software-only product for PCs using DOS as the operating system, in both standalone and LAN versions. The DBMS is FoxPro, dBase III, or dBase IV; Clipper is the programming language. The number of concurrent users or database size is only limited by the size and speed of a customer's hardware. The system can import, edit, store, and export full-MARC bibliographic records. General enhancements are usually released quarterly; those that include optional subsystems are usually released annually. General releases are free to customers who pay for the Micro-VTLS maintenance agreement. A toll-free number is provided for customer support.

The company sold 14 units in 1996- one bundled system and 13 software packages, bringing the total number of installed sites to 9 standalone and 139 networked-6/75 in North America, 3/15 in Europe, 0/4 in South America, and 0/36 in Asia (47% were public, 39% special, and 14% academic libraries). All sites were using the authority control and OPAC modules; 90% circulation; 80% local cataloging; 15% community information (I&R); 10% interlibrary loan; and 2% each were using the acquisitions and serial control modules. A LAN interface was at 99% of the sites; 80% each had a Micro-VTLS dedicated OPAC interface and an interface to other systems from VTLS; 40% had an OCLC interface; 35% had a CD-ROM interface; 10% had a BiblioFile interface; and 21% had an Internet interface.

Gross sales for 1996 for all products were between $5 and $10 million, with an after-tax profit. VTLS reported that two staff members were committed to software maintenance and development; two to sales and marketing (plus seven in international sales, and 16 agents throughout the world), and two to Micro-VTLS customer service (plus an 18-person general customer services staff). Major software enhancements in 1996 included improved circulation statistics, such as generating a list of items that have not circulated since a certain date, a list of patrons with no circulation activity since a certain date, a list of patrons whose account has expired, an option to stop sending overdue notices after a patron has received the "final notice," and ability to sort the shelflist report by author or title as well as by call number.

[VTLS, Inc., 1800 Kraft Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060; (800) 468-8857 or (540) 557-1200; fax (540) 557-1210; askvtls@vtls.com; http://www.vtls.com.]

Winnebago Software Company offers CIRC/CAT and CIRC/CAT Spectrum as either bundled systems or software-only products that run on Motorola and Intel-based PCs. The operating systems are DOS, Mac OS, Windows NT, Windows 95, and Windows 3.0; the DBMS is Btrieve and C-Tree; and the programming languages are Pascal, "C", "C++" and Assembler, The software is offered in both a standalone and LAN version. The number of concurrent users is virtually unlimited; the maximum database size is 40 billion records. The system utilizes full-MARC bibliographic records. Software enhancements are usually released every 12 to 18 months, and they are free to all customers with support agreements; upgrades from competitors are also available. A toll-free number for customer service is provided.

During 1996, the company sold roughly 7,000 units-l,400 bundled and 5,600 software-only packages. Its total installed system base is 8,175 standalone/19,550 networked units worldwide, 8,000/19,000 in North America, 100/400 in Europe, 25/50 each in Asia/Oceana, South America, and Africa/Middle East (80% school libraries, 10% public, 5% each academic and special libraries). All sites were using local cataloging and the report generator; 95% each were using authority control, circulation, and inventorying modules; 50% each were using e-mail; 80% each were using the OPAC, journal citation files, and community information; and 10% each were using acquisitions, interlibrary loan, materials booking, GUI OPAC, Web OPAC, and GUI technical services. A LAN interface was in use at 70% of the sites; 40% each had a CD-ROM interface and remote database searching through gateway; 30% had a BiblioFile interface; 20% had WLN interface; and 10% each had interfaces to OCLC, RLIN, and UTLAS, and an Internet gateway server.

The company reported that for 1996, gross revenues were between $25 and $30 million, with an after-tax profit. An estimated 50 staff members were committed to software maintenance and development, 70-75 to marketing and sales, and 50 to customer support. Client/server options became available in 1996; and the company made a commitment to Z39.50.

[Winnebago Software Company, 457 East South Street, Caledonia, MN 55921; (507) 724-5411 or (800) 654-3002; fax (507) 724-2301; sales@winnebago.com; http://www.winnebago.com.]

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View Citation
Publication Year:1997
Type of Material:Article
Language English
Published in: Library Systems Newsletter
Publication Info:Volume 17 Number 05
Issue:May 1997
Page(s):33-44
Publisher:American Library Association
Place of Publication:Chicago, IL
Notes:Howard S. White, Editor-in-Chief; Richard W. Boss, Contributing Editor
Company: Brodart, Inc.
SIRS Mandarin, Inc.
Caspr, Inc.
EOS International
Follett Software Company
Kelowna Software, Ltd.
The Library Corporation
Nichols Advanced Technologies Inc.
ON POINT, Inc.
Quinte Computer Services, Ltd.
SIRS, Inc.
Tek Data Systems Company
VTLS, Inc.
Winnebago Software Company
Mandarin Library Automation
Products: LePac
Precision One Integrated System
Media Minder
LibraryWorks
GLAS
Professional Series
Manager Series
Catalog Plus
Catalog Plus
Library 4 Universal
BiblioFile
Library.Solution
Athena
MOLLI
Total Library Computerization
Quinte Library Services
Mandarin
C2
Series-M
MicroVTLS
CIRC/CAT
Subject: Library automation systems -- PC based
Library automation systems -- Macintosh
Library automation systems -- directories
ISSN:0277-0288
Record Number:5547
Last Update:2022-07-27 17:23:23
Date Created:0000-00-00 00:00:00
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