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Annual survey of automated library system vendors: multi-function systems running on mainframes, minis, and micros that use a multi-user operating system

Library Systems Newsletter [March / April 1994]

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Each year for the past decade, Library Systems Newsletter has surveyed the library automation industry to get an overview of the market in order to facilitate comparison among vendors. This issue is devoted to summarizing the responses of vendors that offer integrated, multi-user, multi-function systems--those running on mainframes, minis, and micros using a multi-user operating system, whether UNIX, PICK, ,OS/2, or the proprietary operating system of a hardware manufacturer. In a subsequent issue, we will summarize the survey results for micro-based systems using single-user operating systems such as MS-DOS. Vendors which have undertaken development with multiple operating systems are included in this issue if sales of the product with a multi-user operating system were at least $1 million in the past year.

Both turnkey and software-only vendors are included in the same report because most vendors now sell both ways. Turnkey vendors are those that provide hardware, software, installation, training, and ongoing support from a single source. They assume liability for total system performance. Software-only sales give the buyer only a guarantee that the software is free of defects.

All major vendors now have acquisitions, serials control, circulation, and online patron access catalog modules in general release. Most offer a number of additional modules: course reserves, inventorying, information and referral, journal citation, and media booking. Several have interlibrary loan modules in development, with general release scheduled for 1995 or 1996. A majority support Z39.50-based linkages to other systems.

This survey uses the same methodology employed in previous years. Vendors were contacted by mail, with follow-up by telephone and fax. Our queries focused on whether the product was available as a turnkey system, a software package, or both; the hardware platform, operating system, and programming language(s); the number of "new name" sales during the calendar year; the total number of installations; the number awaiting installation and/or acceptance; gross sales revenues for 1993; profitability; the percentage of customers using each module or major function; the sizes of the installed systems; and the number of staff devoted to software maintenance and development, sales and marketing, and to other customer support. Major enhancements reported by the vendors also are included.

It should be noted that the vendor responses are accepted at face value. The survey form is intended to be straightforward and unambiguous and yet there is always the possibility that a vendor has responded using his or her own set of criteria. One of the values of asking the same questions over a number of years is that inconsistencies may be sorted out, especially over time.

We have focused on the presentation of data and have avoided drawing conclusions. Several evaluative articles are planned for future issues of LSN.

SUMMARY

LSN requested information from 26 North American and two European vendors of integrated, multi-function, turnkey library systems or software packages for supermicro, mini, or mainframe computers in North America. Twenty-three companies responded to the survey. The five companies that did not respond--Computer Management and Development Services, Cuadra Associates, Far West Data Control, Inc., Georgetown University Library Information System, and United Systems Technology, Inc.--together are believed to represent less than 1% of the total market.

Several companies have more than one multi-user product, for example, DRA, Geac, and NOTIS. The figures in the articles are for the entire company unless otherwise noted.

Of the vendors who responded, 17 offer both turnkey systems and software packages; six offer software only; and one also sells hardware, but not "bundled" with the software as a turnkey system.

This year's survey respondents (23) reported a cumulative total of 1,600 new name sales in 1993. Table 1 below contains the comparable figure for each year that LSN has been publishing this industry survey.


Table 1. Total annual "new name" sales reported each year to LSN, 1984-1993
Year Number of Systems Sold
1993----------------------- 1,600
1992---------------- 1,121
1991------------ 674
1990 -------566
1989 ----435
1988 ----376
1987 ---350
1986 --210
1985 --196
1984 --232

According to information contained in this survey, in 1993 the vendors we surveyed had combined gross sales of $300+ million. The total number of installations claimed by the respondents was 8,296.

Dynix and Geac reported gross revenues in excess of $45 million; DRA, IME, and Innovative Interfaces reported gross revenues in the $25-$35 million range; NOTIS reported sales of $15-$20 million; and CARL, Sobeco Ernst & Young, and VTLS claimed sales of $5-$10 million each. All others either realized sales of under $5 million or declined to provide information.

Table 2 is a list of the vendors by total number of new name system sales (i.e., sales to other than existing customers) sold during 1993, as reported by the vendors themselves. Table 3 is a listing by number of staff devoted to software maintenance and development, and Table 4 is a ranking by the number of staff devoted to customer support. Table 5 is a ranking derived from comparing the number of staff devoted to customer service to the total number of installations reported, expressed as a ratio,


Table 2. Vendors reporting 10 or more new name system sales in 1993
Vendor No. of Sales
Dynix 404
IME Systems 402
Sobeco Ernst & Young120
Sirsi112
Innovative Interfaces66
Gaylord54
DRA40
Geac31
Information Dimensions26
VTLS25
NOTIS15
Best-Seller10
No other vendor claimed to have sold 10 systems in 1993.


Table 3. Vendors with at least 12 staff devoted to software maintenance and development, arranged numerically.
Vendor Software Maintenance/
Development Staff
Dynix115
Geac82
NOTIS58
CARL 55
DRA 25
IME Systems 25
VTLS 25
Gaylord 20
Innovative Interfaces 20
Sirsi 17
Sobeco Ernst & Young 14
MARCorp 14
International Library Systems 12
No other vendor claimed to have more than 10 people devoted to software maintenance and development.


Table 4. Vendors with at least 12 staff devoted to customer support
Vendor No. of Customer
Support Staff
Geac299
Dynix248
Innovative Interfaces60
IME Systems50
DRA42
Sobeco Ernst & Young42
Sirsi29
NOTIS26
Gaylord24
VTLS23
CARL12
All other companies had fewer than 10 staff each devoted to customer support.


Table 5. The relationship between customer support staff and total installed systems, expressed ap a ratio
Vendor Ratio of Support
Staff to Installations
MARCorp 1:2
CARL1:2.6
Geac1:3.4
Advanced Computer Concepts1:3.5
Innovative Interfaces1:6
Dynix 1:6.2
CoBIT 1:6.7
Gaylord 1:6.7
Sobeco Ernst & Young 1:7.4
VTLS 1:8.3
Best-seller 1:8.9
DiSC 1:9.3
Sirsi 1:9.6
DRA 1:10
Cordant 1:14
NOTIS 1:15.4
Gateway 1:16
Comstow 1:26
ELiAS 1:39
IME Systems 1:41
International Library System 1:57
Information Dimensions 1:65
Ringgold 1:66

VENDOR REPORTS

Advanced Computer Concepts, Inc., offers both turnkey systems and software packages. The hardware is PCs and UNIX workstations, using the standard M (formerly MUMPS) database management system and programming language and several operating systems, including UNIX, DOS, VMS, MVS, and NT. The company reported two new name sales during 1993, both to special libraries. This brings its installed central site base to 7--6 in North America (four academic libraries and three special libraries) supporting approximately 50 different libraries with shared central sites. Gross revenues were reported at under $1 million, with an after-tax profit. All sites were using acquisitions, local cataloging, authority control, circulation, serials control, online patron access catalog, interlibrary loan, materials booking, report generator, journal citation files, inventorying, community information, and electronic mail. All sites had an OCLC interface, LAN interface, and interface to other systems from the same vendor; and 50% had an Internet interface. Two of the sites supported over 400 concurrent users; and four had 30-60. Four persons were committed to software maintenance and development, one to sales and marketing, and two to customer support. Major enhancements in 1993 included integration with database search and Graphical User Interface (X-windows and Microsoft Windows).

[Advanced Computer Concepts, Inc., 46 Hillvale, St. Louis, MO .63105; (314) 862-1898; fax (314) 721-1898.]

Atlantic Rim Information Systems, Inc., formerly known as Grom Hayes Library Automation System, is in the process of being incorporated using the old Grom Hayes Systems as its base. Full-service systems are being developed and tested in the areas of cataloging, circulation, periodicals control, inventory, and A-V equipment handling. A formal release is planned for mid- to late-1994.

[Atlantic Rim Information Systems, Inc., One Linden Court, Bloomfield, CT 06002; (203) 527-4111.]

Best-Seller Library Systems offers both turnkey systems and software only. The hardware includes both Hewlett-Packard and IBM minicomputers, and runs on three UNIX operating systems--HP MPE/iX, HP-UX, and IBM AiX. The DBMS is SpeedWare 4GL, and the applications are written in "C." The vendor sold 10 new systems during 1993--six to public libraries, two academic, and two special libraries. Three systems were awaiting acceptance at year's end. The company's total installed base at the end of 1993 was 58--50 in North America (65% public, 10% academic, and 25% special libraries). Gross sales were between $1-$2.5 million with an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, circulation, and online patron access catalog; 90% were using serials control; and 80% acquisitions. Report generator was in use at 40% of the sites; inventorying at 30%; materials booking at 20%; electronic mail at 10%; and community information at 2%. An Utlas interface was in use at 88% of the sites; a LAN interface at 50%; and an OCLC interface at 2%. Fifteen percent of the sites were able to interface with other systems of the same vendor; 10% had remote database searching; and 2% had an Internet interface. One of the sites supported 100-199 concurrent users; two had 60-99; seven had 30-60; 12 had 16-29; 24 had 8-15; and 12 had 2-7. A staff of eight was committed to software maintenance and development, 4.5 FTE to marketing and sales, and 6.5 FTE to customer support. Major enhancements in 1993 included Community information module (I&R); a UNIX version; and DDE interface to PC-based software (e.g., image databases, word processing, spreadsheets).

In addition to the U.S. office in Havertown (PA) and a West Coast office in Pacific Grove (CA), there is a headquarters office in St. Laurent (Quebec).

[Best-Seller Library Systems, Inc., 701 Merion Avenue, Havertown, PA 19083; (610) 789-8094; fax (610) 789-8095.]

CARL Corporation offers both turnkey systems and software only. The hardware is Tandem, and the operating system is Tandem Guardian. The applications are written in TAIL (Transaction Application Language). CARL sold three new systems during 1993--to public libraries. Two systems were in the process of being installed/accepted at the year's end. The company's total installed base at the end of 1993 was 32 systems supporting 420 libraries (59% public, 38% academic, and 3% school libraries). Gross sales were between $5-$10 million, with an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, circulation, online patron access catalog, interlibrary loan, report generator, and inventorying capabilities. Electronic mail and journal citation files were in use at 90% of the sites; 85% were using community information; and 75% each were using acquisitions and serials control. Authority control was in testing at the end of the year. An OCLC interface was in use at 95% of the sites; BiblioFile was at 20%; LaserCat at 10% of the sites; and 2% each had RLIN and WLN interfaces. All sites were able to interface with other systems of the same vendor; 80% had LAN interfaces; 75% had an Internet interface; 90% had remote database searching; and 10% had an 051 interface to other systems. Three of the sites supported over 1,000 concurrent users; nine sites supported over 400; 10, 200-399; four, 100-199; one, 60-99; four, 30-60; and one, 16-29. A staff of 55 was committed to software maintenance and development, three to marketing and sales, and 12 to customer support. Major enhancements in 1993 included Public Catalog Gills--full release of Kid's Catalog for Macintosh and Windows; X.12 interfaces to major vendors; major new releases to circulation (C400) and Reserves; minor releases to Serials and Acquisitions; cooperative circulation for consortia with global file; gateway to BNA; voice notification and V-View (large print screen) product releases to Circulation and PAC, respectively; and UnCover user address registration capabilities (e.g., fax and E-mail) for enhanced document delivery.

[CARL Corporation, 3801 E. Florida Avenue, Suite 300, Denver, CO 80210; (303) 758-3030; fax (303) 758-0606.]

CoBIT (The Council for Bibliographic and Information Technologies) offers both turnkey systems and software-only packages known as TLM (The Library Machine) for the Data General MV Series of mini/supermini-computers The operating system is DG's Proprietary AOS/VS II (Advanced Operating Systems/ Virtual Storage), the programming language is PL/1, and the DBMS is DGs Proprietary Infos II. The company reported no system sales in 1993, and none are awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year, keeping the total number of installations at 10--all in North America. A breakdown by library type consisted of 85% public, 10% school, and 5% academic libraries. Revenues were under $1 million. The company did not report on profitability because it is a non-profit organization. All of the sites had local cataloging, circulation, and online patron access catalog modules; 20% each had authority control and inventorying; and 10% each had acquisitions, serials control, community information, and electronic mail. An OCLC interface was in use at 50% of the sites; 20% had an interface to other systems from the same vendor; and 10% had an Internet interface. (The company also reported that 30% had a Precision One Interface and 40% had an Auto-Graphics Interface, CD-ROM product). Two of the sites supported 200-399 concurrent users; one supported 60-99; five, 30-60; and two, 16-29. The company had two persons devoted to software maintenance and development, .5 FTE to marketing and sales, and 1.5 FTE to customer support.

[CoBIT, 3380 Tremont Road, Columbus, OH 43221-2112; (614) 538-1222 or (800837-1222; fax (614) 538-0630.]

Comstow Information Services offers software only, almost exclusively to special libraries. The product, known as BiblioTech, runs on all VAX/VMS and UNIX-based hardware (HP, SUN, DEC Alpha) using the VAX/VMS operating system, with DRS DBMS under VMS, and programs in Empress under UNIX. The company sold one new system and two upgrades in 1993, bringing its total installations to 66 (98% special and 2% school libraries), all in North America. One system was awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Revenues were under $1 million, with an after-tax profit. All of the sites were using local cataloging, authority control, online patron access catalog, report generator, journal citation files, inventorying, and electronic mail modules at the end of 1993. Half of the sites were using acquisitions; 80% each were using circulation and interlibrary loan; and 70% were using serials control.

Approximately 10% had an OCLC interface; 4% a BiblioFile interface; and 50% had remote database searching. All of the sites had a local area network interface; 50% had an OSI interface to other systems; 30% had interfaces with other library systems of the same vendor; and 20% had an Internet interface. Four of the sites were supporting 30-60 concurrent users; 12 had 16-29; 21 had 8-15; 19 had 2-7; and 10 had just 1 user. The company had 2.5 FTE persons devoted to software maintenance and development, 1.5 FTE to sales and marketing, and 2.5 FTE to customer support at the end of 1993. New developments include Release 6.0 providing a utility module for local customization of screen forms; use of site location as a Boolean searchable index in combination with bibliographic criteria; ability to clone bibliographic records in cataloging module; ability to create holds for circulation at the title, volume, or on any group of volumes (by branch and volume number, year, etc.); and ability to add unlimited custom material types for original cataloging and indexing; plus over 150 miscellaneous enhancements throughout the system. New products available--module for NTIS downloading from online or CD-ROM, and module for downloading from any Dialog database in Format 4.

[Comstow Information Services, P.O. Box 277, 249 Ayer Road, Harvard, MA 01451-0277; (508) 772-2001; fax (508) 772- 9573.]

Cordant, Inc., formerly known as Centel Federal Systems, Inc., offers a software-only product called DataLib for DEC VAX and Data General MV Series hardware platforms. The operating systems are VMS for DEC and A0S/VS for Data General, the DBMS is a proprietary system, and the programming languages are FORTRAN77 and C++. The company reported one new name sale in 1993, bringing its total installed base to 27 in North America--28 worldwide (all to special libraries). No systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of 1993. Sales revenues were under $1 million for 1993, with an after-tax profit. All of the customers were using local cataloging, authority control, online patron access catalog, electronic mail, and report generator module. At the end of the year, 89% were using circulation, 79% serials control, 36% acquisitions, and 2% community information. An OCLC interface was in use at half of the sites; 20% had remote database searching; and 10% had an RLIN interface. Two staff were committed to software development and maintenance, one to marketing and sales, and two were committed to customer support. No information was provided on the number of concurrent users at each site. Major enhancements during 1993 included development of a Windows-based GUI called PatronSearch for use on 386 PCs; changed to data allocation protocols to permit large databases to use less space on their mini platforms; and an enhancement to custom display screens to permit users to vary their displays at will.

[Cordant, Inc., 11400 Commerce Park Drive, Reston, VA 22091-1506; (703) 758-7000 or (800) 843-4850; fax (703) 758-7380.]

Data Research Associates offers both turnkey system and software-only options. The products--known as the Data Research System (DR) and INLEX/ 3000--run on Digital and HP hardware platform using Digital Open VMS and HP MPE/IX respectively. Client/server products are in development for POSIX- compliant UNIX and Windows compatible hardware. The programming language used is "C"; with some supporting modules in Pascal and Basic. DRA reported 15 upgrade sales and 40 new name sales in 1993. The new sales were 35% public, 60% academic, and 2.5% each to special and school libraries. The installed base rose to 426 sites--373 in North America. Four systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Gross sales were between $25 and $30 million, with an after-tax profit. Local cataloging, authority control, and circulation were in use at all sites; 95% were using the OPAC; 75%, community information capabilities; 85% each were using acquisitions, serials control, and electronic mail. Half of the sites were using inventorying. Materials booking and report generator were each in use by 40%; interlibrary loan by 10%; and journal citation files by 25%. Eighty percent had an OCLC interface; 5% each had a BiblioFile, Utlas, or WLN interface; and 1% a LaserCat interface. Half of the sites were using an Internet interface; 35% had an interface with other systems from the same vendor; 40% had a LAN interface; 45% had the remote database searching interface; and 1% had LC authorities CD-ROM interface. Nine of the sites supported over 400 concurrent users; 33, 200-399; 47, 100-199; 49, 60-99; 109, 30-60; 95, 16-19; 62, 8-15; and 23 had 2-7 users. A staff of 25 was committed to software maintenance and development; 33 to sales and marketing; and 42 to customer support. Major enhancements included V2.2 and 2.3 of DR including all new serials and acquisitions; basic programming for MARC format integration and MARC holdings format support in DR; Z39.50 client and server modules for the DR System; 3M self-charge interface (both INLEX and DR); telephone notices (INLEX, DR); Dial-Up I&R Catalog (INLEX): ADA-Compliant OPAC interfaces (INLEX, DR); enhanced security (INLEX); Additions to vendor list for electronic ordering (INLEX).

DRA maintains offices in St. Louis, Monterey (CA), Richmond (VA), Melbourne, Singapore; and numerous remote sales offices.

[Data Research Associates, Inc., 1276 N. Warson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63132-1806; (800) 325-0888 or (314) 432-1100; fax (314) 993-8927.]

Dynix offers both turnkey systems and software packages for a wide range of machines. The operating systems are UNIX with VMark's UniVerse, Primos with Information, MS-DOS, UNIX with Pick Tel or PICK Blue, and SCO-UNIX. Its hardware platforms are DEC Risc and Alpha, HP 9000 Series, IBM RS/6000 Series, MIPS, Prime 50 Series, Sequent, Sequoia, Unisys 5000 Series, Data General, Bull DPX/20, SUN, and Wyse x86. During 1993, the vendor reported sales of 406 systems, of which 379 were new name (50% to school libraries, 25% public, 20% academic, 2% special, and 3% consortia), bringing its total to 1,505 worldwide--1,040 in North America. A breakdown of the installed systems consisted of 29% public, 13% academic, 6% special, 50% school, and 2% consortia. There were 27 systems awaiting. installation and/or acceptance at year's end. Gross sales revenue was over $45 million worldwide (over $60 million with subsidiaries and related companies included), with an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, report generator, inventorying, and electronic mail; 98% were using circulation; 95% were using OPAC; 40% had acquisitions; 25% had serials control; 12% had community information; and 10% each had ILL and materials booking modules. Some 70% of the sites had all bibliographic interfaces; 20% had a LAN interface; 15% could interface with other systems from the same vendor; 8% each had remote database searching and an Internet interface (Gateways); 5% had LC authorities CD-ROM interfaces; and 75% had an OSI interface to other systems or equivalent protocols (with any UNIX system capable). Fifteen sites had over 400 concurrent users; 21, 200-399 users; 104, 100-199; 114, 60-99; 187, 30-60; 204, 16-29; 234, 8-15; 605, 2-7; and 21 had just 1 user. The company had a staff of 104 (up from 85 in 1992) committed to software maintenance and development, 84 (down from 156 in 1992) committed to marketing and sales, and a staff of 240 (up from 41) committed to customer support. The major enhancements during 1993 included general release of Release 140; general availability of Vista Citation Center; and general release of gateway software.

There are several versions of the Dynix product, including Scholar (school libraries), Elite (small libraries), and Marquis (client/ server). Marquis differs significantly in functionality from the rest and has separate sales figures reported for it. Marquis is primarily a software-only product, but the company can also supply hardware. The operating system for the server is OS/2, UNIX, VMS, MPE, or NetWare; OS/2 for library staff workstation; and OS/2, Macintosh, and Windows for Public Access workstations. The database management system is Sybase SQL Server, and the programming languages are "C" and Modula-2. The company sold 25 new name systems in 1993 (48% special libraries and 52% academic libraries). The total number of installed and accepted systems was 35--29 in North America--consisting of 54% academic and 46% special libraries. Thirteen systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Gross sales were between $5 and $10 million, with an after-tax profit. All of the sites were using local cataloging, authority control, circulation, and online patron access catalog; 66% were using serials control; and 63% were using acquisitions. All of the sites had a LAN interface; and half of the sites could interface to other systems from the same vendor. Fifteen sites supported over 400 concurrent users; four, 100-199; four, 60-99; four, 30-60; seven, 16-29; and one supported 8-15 users. The company reported a staff of 11 committed to software development and maintenance, five to sales and marketing; and eight to customer support. Major enhancements in 1993 included Release 3.0 and 3.1, which added these functions, among others: context-sensitive online help for all modules; ability to import authority records; handling of standard European UNIMARC format; fact-add feature in circulation to allow check-out of uncataloged items; unlimited size of search results retrievable in PAC.

In addition to its corporate head-quarters in Provo, Dynix maintains offices in Dulwich (Australia), Waterloo, Auckland, Versailles, Berlin, Mexico City, Utrecht (The Netherlands), London, and Dublin (Ireland).

[Dynix, Inc., 400 Dynix Dr., Provo, UT 84604-5650; (801) 223-5200 or (800) 223-5413; fax (801) 223-5202.]

ELiAS, MS. (Extended Library Access Solutions)--which acquired the product DOBIS/LIBIS from IBM officially on October 1, 1992--markets the software-only product for hardware based on 5/370 Mainframes (ES/9000, 9370, 4300) IBM or compatible. The operating systems are MVS and VSE, and the programming languages are PL/1, VSAM, and DEAN (MVS only). The company sold four systems in 1993--three of which were new name. The total number of installed and accepted systems was 157--15 in North America--consisting of 45% academic, 36% special, 15% public, and 2% school libraries. One system was awaiting installation and/or acceptance at year end. The company reported gross sales of between $1 and $2.5 million, but did not realize an after-tax profit as it was their first year as a new company. All sites were using authority control and report generator; 70% had circulation; 60% each had acquisitions and online patron access catalog; 30% had electronic mail; 20% had interlibrary loan; 10% each had local cataloging, serials control, and journal citation files; and 5% had inventorying. Ten percent had an OCLC interface; 30% had an Internet interface; 60% had remote database searching; and 2% had LC authorities CD-ROM interface. Three sites supported over 400 concurrent users; four, 200-399; eight, 100-199; 75, 60-99; 32, 30-60; 30, 16-29; and five had 8-15 users. Six staff were committed to software maintenance and development, four to sales and marketing, and four to customer support. Major enhancements during the year included new OPAC functionality, including "Quick Search" capability; ability to reset funds and/or vendors for new fiscal years; mass input of copies; intransit handling of circulated items; and new client-server applications, such as circulation back-up.

[ELiAS N.V., 60 Kapeldreef, E-3001 Leuven, Belgium; Tel: (32) 16-27.03.90, Fax: (32)-16-27.03.l9.]

Gateway Software Corporation offers both turnkey systems and software-only for the IBM AS/400 series of minicomputers. The operating system is OS/ 400, and the programming language is AS/400 RPG. The company sold four upgrade and six new systems (all to school libraries) in 1993, bringing the total number of installations to 64 (all in North America)--95% school libraries, and 5% special libraries.

No system was awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Gross sales were under $1 million; no further financial information was given. All of the sites were using local cataloging, circulation, OPAC, interlibrary loan, and inventorying. Some 75% had report generator; 50%, serials control; 40%, electronic mail; and 15% had materials booking. OCLC and BiblioFile interfaces were each in use at 10% of the sites; 15% had a LAN interface; 2%, Internet interface; and 5% had remote database searching. One of the installations supported 200-399 concurrent users; three, 60-99; seven, 30-60; 15, 16-29; 23, 8-15; and 15 had 2-7 users each. A staff of three was committed to software development and maintenance, 1.5 FTE to marketing and sales, and 4.5 FTE to customer support. The major enhancements in 1993 include Search Alternative Module, which allows searching of external MARC database products loaded onto the AS/400, CD-ROM resources, and online resources; Reading Incentive Module, which allows libraries to automatically track reading programs; ZEBRA barcode generator, which allows patron and holding barcodes to be printed; Authority Control, search alternative titles, authors, enhanced "see" and "see also-"Acquired the LMS library automation package previously developed and maintained by NCS--the customers using this software use AS/400 and System 36 systems, and Gateway offers product support and enhancement to these customers.

[Gateway Software Corporation, 10 S. Montana Ave., Fromberg, MT 59029; (406) 668-7661; fax (406) 668-7665.]

Gaylord Information Systems' integrated library system, Galaxy, is offered as both a turnkey system and as a software package. Gaylord also markets SuperCAT--its CD-ROM, PC-based cataloging system--as well as continuing its support of approximately 25 service bureau customers who have DEC PDP-11 or Apple IIe local circulation control systems connected for overdue notice and report processing purposes. The responses in this report are for the GALAXY product only. The hardware is DEC VAX and Alpha using the open VMS operating system, and a proprietary MARC DBMS and the ANSI "C" programming language. The company sold 59 GALAXY systems, 54 new name (70% public libraries, 16% academic, 7% school, and 7% special libraries). Total installations were 161--all in North America--68% public, 20% academic, 8% school, and 4% special libraries. Sixteen systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at year end. The company declined to report revenues and profitability for 1993; however, in 1992 they reported between $5 and $10 million with an after-tax profit. Extrapolating from this and based on the number of sales reported, 1993 revenues were probably just over $10 million. All sites were using local cataloging, OPAC, interlibrary loan, report generator, inventorying, and electronic mail; 97% were using circulation. Half were using authority control; 20% each were using acquisitions and serials control; and 1% each were using journal citation files and community information. One-quarter of the sites were using the OCLC interface; and 10% had remote database searching. An Internet interface was used at 2% of the sites; and 10% each had a LAN interface and the ability to interface with other systems of the same vendor. Two sites supported 200-399 concurrent users; four had 100-199; three, 60-99; 17, 30-60; 39, 16-29; 57, 8-15; and 43 had 2-7 users. Twenty staff were committed to software maintenance and development, 13 to sales and marketing, and 24 to customer support. A new release containing over 170 enhancements was issued in 1993. Newly developed features included school system feature (among them student record fields, exchange of data to/from administrative systems, and check-out without patron barcodes); Community Information Module; Telephone Notification System (overdues and reserves); Enhanced Acquisitions module (with BISAC interfaces, claiming, and recall); and first Open VMS DEC Alpha installation.

Gaylord maintains offices in Syracuse, McClellanville (SC), Sandy (UT), Williamsport (PA), Highland Heights (OH), Homer (NY), and Lenexa (KS).

[Gaylord Information Systems, P.O. Box 4901, Syracuse, NY 13221-4901; (315) 457-5070 or (800) 272-3414; fax (315) 451-4760.]

Geac offers both turnkey and software-only systems for its products, ADVANCE Integrated Library Systems (which replaced its GLIS System), and PLUS Integrated Library System (formerly LIBS 100Plus, which was acquired from CLSI in 1992). ADVANCE uses UNIX and runs on a variety of hardware platforms (Pyramid, Motorola, Sequent Symmetry, Geac PowerServer, DEC, Bull, Siemens) using UniVerse DBMS, and SQL and "C" programming languages. PLUS uses Sequent, Symmetry, Geac PowerServer, and Motorola hardware using the UNIX operating system, Informix RDBMS, and SQL and "C" programming language. The vendor reported sales of 33 ADVANCE systems, including 29 new name sales during 1993, with 20 systems awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. The total number of installed ADVANCE systems worldwide at year end was 108--53 in North America. (There were also 136 GLIS sites still being supported worldwide--51 in North America.) The ADVANCE customer base was 64% academic, 24% public, 10% special, and 2% school. The vendor reported PLUS sales of 29, including two new name sales in 1993, with 11 systems awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. The vendor was supporting 70 installed PLUS system--SB in North America. (In addition, it was also supporting 691 installed LIBS 100Plus systems--633 in North America.) The PLUS customer base consisted of 76% public libraries; 18% academic; 4% special; and 2% school libraries. The company reported total sales of over $45 million, with an after-tax profit.

All ADVANCE customers were using local cataloging, authority control, circulation, online patron access catalog, interlibrary loan, report generator, and electronic mail; 80% each had acquisitions and serials control; 60% had inventorying; and 25% each had materials booking and journal citation files. Ninety percent were using an OCLC interface; 20% the RLIN interface; 10% each used an Utlas or WLN interface; and 5% were using a BiblioFile interface. Half of the sites had a LAN interface; 20% an Internet interface; and 5% an LC authorities CD-ROM interface. An interface to other systems of the same vendor was in use at 5% of the sites, as was an OSI interface to other systems. Remote database searching was in use at 40% of the sites.

All of the PLUS customers were using local cataloging, authority control, circulation, report generator, and electronic mail; 95% were using online patron access catalog; 75% interlibrary loan; 45% materials booking; and 3% each acquisitions and journal citation files. An OCLC interface was in use at 85% of the sites; 15% had an RLIN interface; 10% the BiblioFile interface; and 5% each used an Utlas or WLN interface. Thirty percent each were using remote database searching and a LAN interface; 15% an Internet interface; and 5% an LC authorities CD-ROM interface. An interface to other systems of the same vendor was in use at 5% of the sites, as was an OS! interface to other systems.

Four of the ADVANCE sites had 200-399 concurrent users; 31 had 100-199; 27 had 60-99; 26 had 30-60; 13 had 16-29; five had 8-15; and two had 2-7 users. For the ADVANCE product, a staff of 34 was committed to software maintenance and development, 24 to sales and marketing, and 92 to customer support. (Of the GUS sites, six had 400+ concurrent users; 13 had 200-399 users; 55 had 100-199; 42 had 60-99; 13 had 30-60; four had 16-29; four had 8-15; and one had 2-7 users. The company is not developing bew features for the GLIS System, however, 10 staff were committed to software maintenance and 62 oto customer support.) The major ADVANCE enhancements in 1993 were: general release of 5.0, which includes OPAC enhancements such as review search function, Unlimited related works search capabilities, more information on OPAC screens, easy tailoring of OPAC screens and menus, unlimited hits, OPAC parameters and qualifiers and search editing enhancements. Circulation enhancements included holds on already checked-out items, features for revolving collections, bulk update, temporary location changes, and streamlined RBR processing. Cataloging enhancements included notes indexing, in-analytics, authority-based cataloging, easy workform change, and case-insensitive edit commands. In addition, Geac introduced the LViS (Library Voice Information System), a MultiROM CD-LAN system, and ADA-compliant OptiView and OptiVoice stations.

Of the PLUS sites, three had over 400 concurrent users; seven had 200-399 users; 24 had 100-199; 18 had 60-99; nine had 30-60; five had. 16-29; two had 8-15; and two had 2-7 users. A staff of 30 was committed to software maintenance and development, 23 to sales and marketing; and 83 to customer support. Four LIBS 100Plus customers had over 400 concurrent users; 30 had 200-399 concurrent users; 200 had 100-199; 185 had 60-99; 145 had 30-60; 90 had 16-29; 25 had 8-15; and 12 had 2-7 users. While the company is no longer developing new features for the LIBS 100Plus system, a staff of 8 FTE was committed to software maintenance and development of maintenance releases, and 62 to customer support. The major PLUS enhancements in 1993 were that the acquisitions and journal citations modules both went into beta release. The ILL subsystem of the circulation module provided new ILL capabilities, and the Datalink Remote System Gateway went into general release. Also, Geac ported the PLUS system to the Motorola platform. The client/server-compliant Director's Workstation and Z39.50 Intersystem Link were introduced, as well as the ADA-compliant OptiView and OptiVoice stations.

In addition to its world headquarters in Markham, Ontario, the company has offices in Dallas, St. Louis, Troy (MI), Wallingford (CT),and Newtonville (MA) in the U.S.; as well as principal offices in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

[Geac Computers Inc., 320 Nevada St., Newtonville, MA 02160; (617) 965-6310; fax (617) 969-1928; or Geac computers Ltd., Suite 300, 11 Allstate Pkwy., Markham, Ontario, tSR 183 Canada; (416) 475-0525; fax (416) 475-3847.]

The IME Group offers both turnkey systems and software only; it is estimated that 95% of IME's clients are software only. The product, known as The Information Navigator (TINLIB), is a multi-user, client-server, networked system that runs on all sizes of machines, with UNIX the operating system for larger systems, and MS-DOS for PCs. It uses E-R DBMS, and the programming languages are "C," Assembler, and Microsoft Windows, etc. The company sold 402 new systems and software packages during the year, bringing the total installations to 2,070 systems worldwide (204 in North America). A breakdown by library type consisted of 55% special libraries, 27% academic, and 18% public libraries. Ten systems were awaiting installation/ acceptance at the end of the year. The company reported sales of between $25 and $30 million in 1993 (up from $15- $20 million in 1992; $10-$15 million in 1991; and $1-$2.5 million in 1990) with an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, and the online catalog; 75% had circulation; 60% had serials control; 55% had report generator; 40% had acquisitions; 15% had inventorying; and 10% had community information. Thirty-four sites supported 60-199 concurrent users; 392 had 16-60; 1,179 had 8-15; and 465 had 2-7. The company had 25 FTE staff devoted to software maintenance and development, 50+ FTE to sales and marketing, and 50+ FTE to customer support. Major enhancements in 1993 included creation of a format integrated MARC editor, ability to route client-server across routers in a variety of WANs, and development of a wide range of the Unicode standard in a multiple character set module.

In addition to its U.S. office in Dedham (MA), IME maintains offices in London, Florence, Singapore, Prague, Gothenburg, Laos, and about 20 other affiliated offices worldwide.

[The IME Group, 990 Washington St., Dedham, MA 02026; (617) 320-0303; fax (617) 320-0793.]

Information Dimensions, a subsidiary of OCLC, Inc., offers software only, almost exclusively to special libraries. The product, known as TECHLIBplus, runs on VAX, IBM, HP, and Sun mainframes and minis. The operating systems are MVS/TSO, VMS, and UNIX (SVR4, RISC-OS, ULTRIX, HP-UX, AIX, SUN-OS). BASISplus is the text RDBMS, and FORTRAN, Assembler, and "C" are the programming languages. The company sold 41 packages--26 were new name sales--bringing the total number of installations to 263 worldwide (125 in North America). No system was awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Revenues were between $1-$2.5 million, with no after-tax profit realized for the year. All of the sites were using local cataloging, report generator, and online patron access catalog. Half of the sites were using acquisitions; 5% were using serials control; 90% were using circulation; and 20% each were using authority control, interlibrary loan, and journal citation files. An OCLC interface was in use at 85% of the sites; 20% were able to interface with other systems from the same vendor; and 1% each were using RLIN, Utlas, and BiblioFile interfaces. Five sites supported over 400 concurrent users; 10 had 200-399; 15 had 100-199; 15 had 60- 99; 30 had 30-60; 45 had 16-29; 55 had 8-15; 80 had 2-7; and 10 had just 1 user. A staff of three was committed to software maintenance and development, five to sales and marketing, and four were committed to customer support. Major enhancements during 1993 included the release of TECHLIBplus OPAC for Windows (a GUI) in five languages and completed Version 3.4 in four languages. The purchase of ID! by OCLC in 1993 saw transitioned product development activities to OCLC with plans for considerable product enhancement in 1994.

The company maintains offices in Dublin (OH), Washington, New York, Detroit, San Francisco, Atlanta, and Dallas; and also Ottawa, London, Paris, Melbourne, Frankfort, Stockholm, and Rome.

[Information Dimensions, Inc., 5080 Tuttle Crossing Blvd., Dublin, OH 43017; (614) 761-8083; fax (614) 761- 7290.]

Innovative Interfaces offers both turnkey systems and software packages. The hardware is Digital, IBM, HP, Sun, Silicon Graphics, or most other UNIX machines since the operating system is UNIX. The programming language is "C." The company sold over 100 systems in 1993, including 66 new name. Its total number of installations was 360--336 in North America--81% academic libraries, 16% public, 8% special, and 1% school libraries. There were 56 systems awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of 1993. Revenues were reported to be $30-$35 million, with an after-tax profit. All sites had a report generator module; 95% had serials control; and 90% had acquisitions. Some 85% each had local cataloging, authority control, and online patron access catalog modules; and 75% had circulation. Twenty-five percent had journal citation files; 15% had materials booking; 10% each had inventorying and interlibrary loan; 5% had community information; and 3% had electronic mail. Some 70% had an OCLC interface; 10% an RLIN interface; 5% an Utlas interface; and 2% each had BiblioFile and ABN interfaces; and 1% had a LaserCat interface. Half of the sites had interfaces with other library systems from the same vendor; 50% had an Internet interface; 60% had a local area network interface; 15% had remote database searching; and 3% had LC authorities CD-ROM interface. Ten of the sites were supporting 200-399 concurrent users; 30 had 100-199; 45 had 60-99; 110 had 30-60; 70 had 16-29; 55 had 8-15; and 40 had 2-7 users. A staff of 20 was committed to software maintenance and development at the end of the year, seven to sales and marketing, and 60 to customer support. Major enhancements included support for the new DEC Alpha and OSF/1 operating system, as well as multi-processor SUN computer with Solaris 2.3 operating system; support for Thai characters (in addition to CIX); totally automated interinstitutional borrowing/lending system for OhioLINK universities where patrons initiate transactions using the state-wide INNOPAC Union Catalog.

The company maintains offices in Toronto and Taipei, in addition to Berkeley.

[Innovative Interfaces, Inc., 2344 Sixth Street, Berkeley, CA 94710; (800) 444-2344 or (510) 644-3600; fax (510) 644-3650.]

International Library Systems offers software only for both PC-based and multi-user systems with its SydneyPLUS Library Management System. Hardware platforms are IBM PC and compatibles, Novell LANs, and DEC VAX. The operating systems are MS-DOS, VMS, and UNIX; and all programs are written in "C." The company reported 30 upgrade sales (all to special/corporate libraries). Its worldwide customer base remained 400--300 in north America (the same as reported each year since 1990). Most of the systems (85%) are installed in special/corporate libraries, and about 5% each are in public, academic, and school libraries. Gross revenues remain steady at between $1 and $2.5 million, with an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, and OPAC at year end; 81% were using circulation; 79% were using serials control; and 77% were using acquisitions. OCLC, RLIN, Utlas, and BiblioFile interfaces were each in use at 84% of the sites; and 46% had a LAN interface. There were 66 systems supporting 8-15 concurrent users; 114 with 2-7; and 105 with only 1 user. A staff of 12 was committed to software maintenance and development, five to sales and marketing, and seven to customer support. The company continued to supply customers with quarterly updates and released DEC VAX and UNIX versions of SydneyPLUS. A Windows version of the OPAC was also completed.

The company maintains its headquarters offices in Vancouver, with sales offices in Toronto and Los Angeles.

[International Library Systems, Corp., 320 - 2600 Granville Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V6H 3V3; (604) 734-8882; fax (604) 734-8854.]

MARCorp., formerly known as Carlyle Systems, offers both turnkey systems and software-only systems which run on UNIX-based hardware platforms (Sun, DEC, UNIX-servers; PC compatibles for clients; X-based terminals/workstations). The programming languages are 'C" and "C++," and the DBMS is Ingres. The vendor had three new name sales in 1993, one academic, one school, and one special library. Two were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. The total number of systems installed was 10--a in North America. The company reported revenues of $1-$2.5 million, with an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, circulation, online patron access catalog, report generator, and electronic mail; 50% each had acquisitions, authority control, and serials control modules. All sites had a LAN interface, as well as an interface to other systems from the same vendor; 40% had an OCLC interface; 20% had BiblioFile; and 10% had an RLIN interface. One of the sites supported 100-199 concurrent users; one had 60-99; six had 30-60; one had 16-29; and one had 8-15. A staff of 14 was devoted to software maintenance and development at the end of 1993, eight to marketing and sales, and five to customer support.

[MARcorp., 2000 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 202, San Mateo, CA 94403; (415) 345-2500; fax (415) 349-3874.

National Computer System, Inc. (NSC)--product LMS--was acquired by Gateway Software Corp. during 1993.

NOTIS Systems, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Ameritech, offers both turnkey systems and software packages. The NOTIS Library Management System (LMS) is a software-only product, comprising a complete, integrated package for library automation running on all models of IBM System 370 platform. LMS may be installed on a dedicated or a shared machine. Source code is provided to allow total flexibility. KeyNOTIS is a bundled hardware/software product, providing the functionality of LMS running on an IBM 9370 or ES/9000 configurations; KeyNOTIS does not require programmer support. The operating systems are MVS or VSE with CICS for LMS; and VSE/ESA with CICS for KeyNOTIS. The code is in Basic Assembler and PL/1. Nine new sales were made in 1993 (all to academic libraries), bringing the total worldwide installations to 179--174 in North America. A breakdown by library type consisted of 84% academic libraries, 10% special, 4% public, and 2% school libraries. Some 98% of sites were using online patron access catalog; 96% were using local cataloging; 88% were using circulation; 81% were using authority control; 78% were using acquisitions; 70% were using serials control; and 61% were using journal citation files. An OCLC interface was in use at 80% of sites; an RLIN interface at 12%; and BiblioFile at 1%. Eighteen of the sites were supporting 400+ concurrent users; 33 had 200-399; 45 had 100-199; 29 had 60-99; 32 had 30-60; 17 had 16-29; and four had 8-15. Major enhancements for LMS and KeyNOTIS in 1993 included numerous minor enhancements; and work began on a complete redesign of the circulation module, scheduled for release in late 1994.

Journal citation files may be mounted using the Multiple Database Access System (MDAS). This separately priced software permits the loading of reference and local databases on the local NOTIS computer with the ability to configure record displays and help screens for each database through an online, menu-driven program. NOTIS' two other existing products--known as Citation Database Systems (includes both InfoShare and MDAS installations) and PACLink/PACLoan--are software products that run on the NOTIS LMS or KeyNOTIS platform. As such, they can be supplied as part of the turnkey system or as software only. InfoShare offers easier searching for patrons and staff. It is a server product for locally mounted information databases. NOTIS will supply a complete server or just software for an existing UNIX processor. Databases are delivered pre-indexed with InfoShare. PACLink/ PACLoan enables patrons to easily access information and materials held by other libraries. It is a software system that runs on NOTIS LMS or Key-NOTIS. As such, it can be supplied as part of the turnkey system or as software only. They are both multi-user products. Citation's MDAS runs on IBM System 370, IBM 9370 and ES/9000 hardware with MVS or VSE written in Basic Assembler; InfoShare runs on IBM RS/6000 and Sun SPARCStation with UNIX and the HER database management system and written in C programming language. PACLink/PACLoan, which was introduced in June of 1992, runs on all models of ISM System 370, IBM 9370 and ES/9000s, with the MVS or VSE operating systems and written in Basic Assembler. The company sold 49 Citation systems (all MDAS sales were to NOTIS sites; six of the InfoShare sales were to non-NOTIS sites).

The company sold 50 PACLink/PACLoan systems in 1993, all were installed, bringing its total installed base to 62--all in North America (94% were academic libraries; 5% were special libraries; and 1% were public libraries). All PACLink/PACLoan systems were sold to current NOTIS customers.

InfoShare is NOTIS' first UNIX-based product. It is a fully compliant Z39.50 Version 2 server--the first in the marketplace. It enables libraries to cost-effectively load additional widely-accessed databases and uses lower cost computing hardware. It can be accessed by any Z39.50-compliant client. PACLink/PACLoan is the first and only system available today which combines remote online catalog searching and automated interlibrary loan and document delivery requesting.

Major enhancements for Citation during 1993 included holdings display support for multiple OPAC's; menu-controlled front-end; display and printing for brief and long record formats; downloading of groups of records; continuous printing "marking" of selected records to either print or download. The PACLink/Loan system enables patrons to easily access information and materials held by other libraries. Patrons can search other libraries' collections and initiate online interlibrary loan requests from their OPAC terminal. With PACLink patrons and staff can conduct searches across libraries using their own library system interface because PACLink uses the recognized library information retrieval standards, Z39.50. PACLoan's automated ILL function enables library staff to easily manage interlibrary loan transactions while maintaining control to approve or deny requests.

NOTIS has also introduced a completely new library management System--NOTIS Horizon--which is both a software only and turnkey system that utilizes the client/server model. The server runs on Sun SPARCStation, IBM RS/6000, or Digital's Alpha, Borland Interbase is the DBMS, and "C" is the programming language. The staff client runs on any PC running Microsoft Windows 3.1. Public access clients run on PC, Macintosh, or UNIX workstations. Both types of clients are graphical user interfaces. The company reported 11 systems sales in 1993--six of which were new name sales and five were NOTIS LMS sites. All 11 were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year.

For all products, revenues were in the $15-$20 million range, and the company reported an after-tax profit. A staff of 58 was committed to software maintenance and development, 25 to sales and marketing, and 26 to customer support at the end of 1993.

The company maintains offices in Evanston, Ann Arbor, Ridgefield (CT), Kansas City (MO), Salt Lake City, Centreville (VA), and Bethesda (MD).

[NOTIS Systems, Inc., 1007 Church St., 2nd Floor, Evanston, IL 60201; (708) 866-0150 or (708) 866-0171; fax (708) 866-0178 or (708) 866-4893.]

NSC, Inc. offers software only for minicomputer-based systems. The product, know as AARCS, uses IBM AS/400 mainframe hardware, OS/400, and the code is written in RPG/400. There were five new name sales in 1993 (two to public, one each to special, school, and academic libraries). Its total installed base was 28--27 in North America (75% public; 11% special; 7% school; and 7% academic libraries). No system was awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Total sales were under $1 million, with an after-tax profit. All of the sites were using local cataloging, circulation, report generator, and OPAC. Half of the sites were using inventorying; 60% had authority control; and 90% had interlibrary loan modules. Thirty percent each were using acquisitions and serials control; and 5% were using journal citation files. Half of the sites had an OCLC interface; 20% a BiblioFile interface; and 5% a RLIN interface. Five of the sites were supporting 30-60 concurrent users; 10 had 16-29; five had 8-15; and seven had 2-7. A staff of four was committed to software maintenance and development, one to sales and marketing, and three to customer support. Major enhancement during 1993 included a new journal citation module, enhanced OPAC, and enhanced circulation modules.

[NSC, Inc., 428 west Ryan Street, Brillion, WI 54110; (414) 756-5305 or (800) 624-5720; fax (414) 756-2359.]

Ringgold Management Systems, Inc. offers both turnkey systems and software packages. The product runs on PCs and supermicros, and the operating systems are DOS and UNIX. The programming languages are SQL, COBOL, "C", Visual Basic, and BASIC. The company reported six multi-user system sales during 1993--five of which were new name sales. Three systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Its installed base consisted of 33 sites worldwide--all but one in North America (17 in academic, 15 in public, and one in a special library). Gross revenues were under $1 million; no further financial information was given. Eighty-five percent of the sites were using the acquisitions module; 25% each were using circulation and interlibrary loan; and 10% each were using local cataloging and online patron access catalog. An OCLC interface was in use at 70% of the sites; a LAN interface was at 48%; WLN and BiblioFile were each at 3%; Lasercat interface was at 6%; and an interface to other systems from the same vendor was in use at 10% of the sites. One of the sites was supporting 30-60 concurrent users; one had 16-29; one had 8-15; 14 had 2-7; and 16 had only 1 user. One person was committed to software maintenance and development, and .5 FTE was committed to both sales and marketing and to customer service. Major enhancements in 1993 included beta release of patron access catalog; utilizing full MARC, keyword searching, server architecture (for SQL clients), additional interfaces (for acquisitions), and second, alternate patron address with effective date (for circulation).

[Ringgold Management Systems, Inc., Box 368, Beaverton, OR 97075-0369; (503) 645-3502; fax (503) 690-6642.]

Sirsi Corporation offers both turnkey systems and software packages with its Unicorn Collection Management System for IBM RS/6000 and other UNIX platforms. The operating system is UNIX; the database management system is BRS/Search; and the code is written in "C." The company reported sales of 112 new turnkey systems and packages during 1993 (over 50% to school libraries). Its total installed base was 277--252 in North America (47.5% school libraries; 17.1% special; 13% public; 12.3% academic; and 10.1% international libraries). Approximately 87 systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. The company declined to report its gross sales (LSN estimate is $5-$l0 million), but reported an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, inventorying, and report generator; and 99% were using online patron access catalog. Serials control was in use at 60%; 96% were using circulation; 80% were using community information; 70% each were using acquisitions and authority control; and 43% were using interlibrary loan. Materials booking was in use at 16%; journal citation files at 13%; and electronic mail at 12%. An OCLC interface was at 75% of the sites; a BiblioFile interface at 10%; RLIN interface at 3%; WLN at 2%; and LaserCat at 1%. An interface to other systems from the same vendor was in use at 57% of the sites; and 69% had remote database searching. A LAN interface was in use at 30%; and an Internet interface was at 15% of the sites. Twenty-one of the sites were supporting over 100 concurrent users; seven were supporting 60-99; 35 were supporting 30-60; 27 had 16-29; 59 had 8-15; 114 had 2-7; and 12 had just 1 user. A staff of 17 was committed to software development and maintenance at the end of 1993; 11 to sales and marketing; and 29 to customer support. Major enhancements for 1993 included release of Internet navigator module; release of request module; release of CD-ROM gateway/server; release of shadow catalog; enhancement to acquisitions module; and enhancement to the report generator.

The company maintains offices in Huntsville, Ottawa, and London.

[Sirsi Corporation, 689 Discovery Dr., Huntsville, AL 35806; (205) 922-9825; fax (205) 922-9818.]

Sobeco Ernst & Young, also known as Multicore Library Services, offers both turnkey systems and software packages for its multiLIS product. The major hardware environments are Digital's VAX and Alpha systems, IBM RS/6000, and Intel 486 PC-based servers (UnixWare). The operating systems are UnixWare from Novell, Aix from IBM, and Open VMS from Digital; it runs on a proprietary DBMS, and the programming language is written in "C." The company reported 120 new name sales, bringing its total to 312--265 in North America (45% public libraries; 23% academic; 22% school; 8% special; and 2% shared libraries). Fifteen systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Gross sales were between $5-$10 million, with an after-tax profit. All of the sites were using local cataloging and authority control; 70% were using online patron access catalog; and 60% were using circulation. Half of the sites were using electronic mail; 20% were using report generator; 16% were using acquisitions; and 3% were using serials control. Six percent of the sites were using an Utlas interface; 10% a BiblioFile interface; 16% an OCLC interface; and 1% the LaserCat interface. A LAN interface was in use at 22%; 33% had an Internet interface; and 2% each had remote database searching and a LC authorities CD-ROM interface. One site was supporting 200-399 concurrent users; seven had 60-99; 12 had 30-60; 30 had 16-29; 92 had 8-15; and 170 had 2-7. A staff of 14.5 FTE was committed to software maintenance and development, 15 (up from 7 in 1992) to sales and marketing; and 42 (up from 29 in 1992) to customer support. Major enhancements during the year included migration of the code from Pascal to "C"; new serials module; complete rewrite of acquisitions with support for X.12; port to the IBM RS/6000 and Digital's Alpha computers; port to UnixWare from Novell which will complement those sites which have NetWare.

The company maintains offices in Paris, Montreal, and Toronto, in addition to its U.S. subsidiary in Dublin, OH.

[Sobeco Ernst & Young, 505 Rene- Levesque Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2Z 1Y7; (514) 392-7820; fax (514) 875-2673.]

Unisys Corporation reported in early 1993 that support f or its PALS product would be assumed by Dynix. PALS is configured around the Unisys 1100/2200 machines. The product uses the OS1100 and DMS 1100 operating systems with the COBOL and "C" programming languages.

VTLS offers both turnkey systems and software packages using Hewlett-Packard 3000 Series, Hewlett-Packard 9000 Series RISC architecture, and IBM RS/6000 RISC architecture computers.

The operating systems are MPE/XL, MPE, IBM VM/SP, VM/IS, VM/XA, VM/ESA with SQL/DS. The software is written in "C" and COBOL, and runs under ORACLE, Turbo Image, and/or SQL/DS. The vendor reported selling 33 systems in 1993, 25 of which were new name sales, bringing its total installed base to 191--99 in North America (47 systems in public libraries, 115 academic, 28 special, and 1 school library). Six systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at year's end. Gross sales were reported between $5 and $10 million (this does not reflect the hardware revenues of Hewlett-Packard direct sales), with an after-tax profit. All of the sites were using local cataloging and report generator; 95% were using the online patron access catalog; 86% were using circulation; 76% had authority control; 65% each had serials control and electronic mail; 44% used acquisitions; 26% had community information; and 2% had journal citation files. Some 70% were using the OCLC interface; 30% had the BiblioFile interface; 10% each had RLIN and Utlas interfaces; and 2% had the WLN interface. A local area network interface was used by 90%; an interface to other systems by the same vendor by 70%; and an Internet interface by 60%. Six percent had an LC authorities CD-ROM interface; and 10% used remote database searching. Three sites were supporting 200-399 concurrent users; 12 had 100-199; 21 had 60-99; 48 had 30-60; 34 had 16-29; 17 had 8-15; and 17 had 2-7. VTLS reported that a staff of 25 was committed to software maintenance and development, 12 to sales and marketing, and 23 to customer support at the end of 1993. The major new products were client-server acquisitions, Z39.50 client and server, image manager and imaging services, ADA workstation. VTLS installed its first UNIX installation and sold two more UNIX systems.

VTLS maintains offices in Blacksburg, Barcelona, and Helsinki, as well as additional sales offices in Houston, Long Beach, and Fillmore (NY). VTLS also has business relationships with agents in Malaysia, Australia, Kuwait, Switzerland, Thailand, and United Arab Emirates.

[VTLS, Inc., 1800 Kraft Dr., Blacksburg, VA 24060; (800) 468-8857 or (703) 231-3605; fax (703) 231-3648.]

Permalink:  
View Citation
Publication Year:1994
Type of Material:Article
Language English
Published in: Library Systems Newsletter
Publication Info:Volume 14 Number 03
Issue:March / April 1994
Page(s):17-32
Publisher:American Library Association
Place of Publication:Chicago, IL
Notes:Howard S. White, Editor-in-Chief; Richard W. Boss, Contributing Editor
Company: Advanced Computer Concepts
Atlantic Rim Information Systems, Inc.
Best-Seller Library Systems, Inc.
CARL Corporation
CoBIT
Comstow Information Services
Centel Federal Systems, Inc.
Cordant, Inc.
Data Research Associates, Inc.
Dynix Systems, Inc.
ELiAS N.V.
Gateway Software Corporation
Gaylord Information Systems
Geac
Informatics Management and Engineering, Inc.
IME, Ltd.
Information Dimensions, Inc.
Innovative Interfaces, Inc.
Open Text Corporation
International Library Systems Corporation
MARCorp
Carlyle Systems, Inc.
National Computer System, Inc.
NOTIS Systems, Inc.
NSC, Inc.
Ringgold Management Systems, Inc.
SIRSI Corporation
Sobeco, Ernst & Young
Multicore Library Services, Inc.
Unisys
VTLS, Inc.
GIS Information Systems
Products: Best-Seller
Carl
The Library Machine
Bibliotech
DATALIB
ATLAS
Dynix
Marquis
DOBIS
Galaxy
Advance
LIBS 100Plus
PLUS
TINLIB
Information Navigator
T Series
BASISplus
INNOPAC
SydneyPlus Library Management
Voyager
NOTIS
KeyNOTIS
NOTIS Horizon
MDAS
InfoShare
PacLink
AARCS
Unicorn
MultiLIS
PALS Automated Library System
VTLS
DRA
Subject: Library automation systems -- directories
ISSN:0277-0288
Record Number:5331
Last Update:2022-09-22 15:01:42
Date Created:0000-00-00 00:00:00
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