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Annual survey of automated library system vendors--mainframe, mini, and supermicro computer-based

Library Systems Newsletter [March 1991]

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Each year ISCI surveys the library automation industry to get an overview of the market and to facilitate comparison among vendors. This issue is devoted to the vendors that offer integrated, multi-user, multifunction systems--those running on mainframes, minis, and supermicros. Both turnkey and software-only vendors are included in the same report because the majority now sells both ways. Turnkey vendors provide hardware, software, installation, training, and ongoing support from a single source. They assume liability for total system performance. Software-only vendors guarantee only that the software is free of defects.

All major vendors are now committed to providing acquisitions, serials control, circulation, and online patron access catalog modules--and in some cases, additional functionality such as information and referral, journal citation, interlibrary loan, and media booking. virtually all of the vendors could deliver the four core modules by the end of 1990, although several were rewriting the acquisitions and serials control modules. Several vendors were also offering journal citation capability, the loading of files of periodical indexes.

This survey is comparable to previous LSN surveys, It focuses on whether the product is turnkey, software-only, or both; its hardware platform, operating system, and programming language(s); number of sales in 1990; total number of installations; number awaiting installation and/or acceptance; gross revenues for 1990; profitability; percentage of customers using each module or major function; sizes of installed systems; and finally, the number of staff devoted to software maintenance and development and customer support. Major enhancements are also reported.

SUMMARY

LSN identified 31 North American organizations marketing integrated, multi-function turnkey library systems or software packages for supermicro, mini, or mainframe computers; all responded to the survey. Nineteen offer both turnkey systems and software packages; eight offer software only (two also sell hardware, but not as a turnkey system; another plans to introduce a turnkey option in 1991); only four offer only turnkey systems. Over 3000 installed systems were reported as of the end of 1990.

The computer industry as a whole had sales of approximately $175 billion in 1990, up eight percent from the previous year; multi-function automated library systems accounted for $200 million, up approximately 15 percent from 1989.

Four vendors--CLSI, Dynix, Information Dimensions, and Innovative Interfaces--reported gross revenues in excess of $20 million, but the Information Dimensions figure includes revenue of related units within the company. Data Research Associates (DRA), Geac, INLEX, and Unisys each reported sales of over $10 million. Gaylord, Multicore/Sobeco, and NOTIS each claimed sales of over $5 million. All others either reported sales of under $5 million for the year or declined to provide information.

Advanced Computer Concepts Inc, formerly listed under Washington University School off Medicine Library, offers both turnkey systems and software packages. The hardware is DEC VAX and personal computers using the standard MUMPS operating system and programming language. The company made one sale during 1990, bringing its installed base to 11--10 in North America. No systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. The company reported gross revenues under $1 million and no after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, circulation, online patron access catalog, interlibrary loan, materials booking, report generator, inventorying, community information, journal citation, acquisitions, authority control, and serial control, as well as word processing; half had an interface to a local area network (LAN). An OCLC interface was in use at all sites. All had interfaces with other systems of the same vendor and remote data base searching. One site supported over 400 terminals; another had 100-199 terminals; nine had 8-15. Five persons were committed to software maintenance and development, and five to other customer service. Major enhancements in 1990 included augmented Medline capabilities.

[Advanced Computer Concepts, Inc., 46 Hillvale, St. Louis, MO 63105; (314) 362-7065; Fax (314) 721-1898.]

Ameritech Information Systems purchased OCLC's local library systems products in late 1990, including LS/2000, ACQ 350 and SC 350. The company declined to report on its plans for the LS/2000 integrated, multi-function, multi-user product, indicating that it had not completed its evaluation and planning. It did respond with regard to the PC-based ACQ 350 and SC 350 products. These reports will be included in the April issue of LSN. OCLC made only two sales of LS/2000 in 1989, and there were no known sales in 1990 prior to the deal with Ameritech. The total number of sites is believed to be 126. At the time of the sale, OCLC also was supporting over 40 LS/2 systems, formerly DataPhase ALIS II systems. Ameritech maintains offices in Dublin (OH), Chicago, Albany, and Raleigh (NC).

[Ameritech Information Systems, 4950 Blazer Memorial Parkway, Dublin, CM 43017; (614) 793-5511 or (919) 876-6936; Fax (614) 764-0723 or (919) 878-9799.]

CARL Systems, Inc., offers both turnkey systems and software packages, as well as centrally supported service bureaus. The hardware is Tandem, and the operating system is Tandem's Guardian 9OXF. The applications are written in TAL (Tandem Application Language). CARL sold two new systems during 1990 and added five new sites to its service bureau. One system was in the process of being installed/ accepted at the end of the year. Its installed base was 10 systems supporting 65 libraries. The company declined to report sales figures or profits. All sites were using local cataloging, circulation, on-line patron access catalog, interlibrary loan, report generator, and inventorying capabilities. Community information was in use at 85% of the sites; 75% each were using acquisitions and serials control; and 70% had installed the journal citation module. An OCLC interface was in use at all sites and a BiblioFile interface was in use at 17% of the sites. All had interfaces with other systems of the same vendor, and 60% had LAN interfaces. One of the sites had over 400 terminals; six had from 200-399; and three had from 100-199. A staff of 10 was committed to software maintenance and development, and six to other customer service. Major enhancements in 1990 included: photo images linked to the online catalog; major searching enhancements in OPAC; Medline gateway via Paperchase; PC-based PAC terminals able to offer full ALA character set display.

[CARL Systems, Inc., 777 Grant Street, Suite 306, Denver, CO 80302; (303) 861- 5319; Fax (303) 830-0103.]

Carlyle Systems, Inc., offers both turnkey and software-only systems which run on Unix-based platforms (Sun, DEC, etc.). The operating system is Unix, and the programming language is "C." The vendor sold three systems in 1990, all awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. The total number of systems installed and accepted by the end of 1990 was 41--33 in North America. The company declined to report sales figures or profits. All sites were using online patron access catalog; and 73% were using local cataloging at the end of 1990. An OCLC interface was in use at 61% of the sites; and 12% of the sites had local area network interfaces. Three sites supported 100-199 terminals; one had 60-99; three had 30-60; eight had 16-29; nine had 8-15; 13 had 2-7; and four had only 1 terminal. Nine staff were devoted to software maintenance and development; three were committed to other customer support. Major enhancements included: completion of the circulation system; integrating the on-line catalog, cataloging, and circulation modules; introduction of an image system; and all software modules ported to Unix.

[Carlyle Systems, Inc., 2000 Alameda de las Pulgas, San Mateo, CA 94403; (415) 345-2500; Fax (415) 349-3874.]

CLSI offers only multi-user turnkey systems. The company migrated to Sequent S27 and S8l and Altos 2000 hardware platforms using the Unix operating system and "C" programming language, but continued to support the Digital PDP 11 platforms previously installed. The vendor reported sales of nine turnkey systems during 1990 and 27 major Unix upgrades. At the end of 1990, it was supporting 335 installed systems--with 273 in North America. Gross sales were in excess of $30 million. The company claims that as a result of the reinvestment of all 1990 revenues in ongoing development of CLSI's next generation product, it did not realize an after-tax profit. All CLSI sites had both circulation and local cataloging. Sixty-three percent of the sites were using the online patron access catalog module; 40% were using authority control; 25% were using acquisitions; 22% community information; 15% interlibrary loan; 12% a report generator; 4% materials booking; and 2% serials control. Fifty-five percent of the sites were using an OCLC interface; 22% were using the BiblioFile interface; 1% each were using the RLIN, UTLAS, and WLN interfaces. Ten percent had LAN interfaces; 25% had an interface with other systems of the same vendor; and 25% had a remote data base searching interface. Sixteen of its clients had 200-399 terminals; 41 had 100-199; 45 had 60-99; 123 had 30-60; 68 had 16-29; 35 had 8-15; and seven had 2-7 terminals. The company reported that 79 staff were assigned to software maintenance and development and 85 staff were assigned to other customer support. Major enhancements during 1990 included Release 29 (also known as the first release of the LIBS 100plus System), which includes: Ingres relational data base management system; state-of-the-art user interface with pull-down menus and automatic pop-up message windows; a redesigned circulation module; extensive report generation capabilities; completed development work for TCP/IP, which enables users to access ports on CLSI systems from any remote host on an Ethernet network.

[CLSI, Inc., 320 Nevada Street, Newtonville, MA 02165; (617) 965-6310; (800) 365-0085; Fax (617) 969-1928.]

CoBIT offers both turnkey systems and software-only packages known as TLM (The Library Machine) for the Data General Eclipse (MV) line of mini/supermini- computers. The product was previously marketed by OHIONET. The operating system is DG's AOS/VS and the programming language is PL/l. The DBMS is Infos II. The company reported sales of three systems in 1990, all awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year, bringing the total number of installations to six. Revenues were between $1 and $2.5 million. The company did not report on profitability because it is a non-profit organization. All of the sites had local cataloging, authority control, circulation, and report generator; 85% had the online patron access catalog; and 15% had acquisitions. All had an OCLC interface, and all were using word processing. Two of the sites supported 200-399 terminals; two had 30-60; and two had 16-29. The company had 2.5 FTE persons devoted to software maintenance and development, and 2.5 FTE to other customer support. The major enhancement in 1990 was keyword-Boolean searching.

[CoBIT, 3380 Tremont Road, Columbus, OH 43221-2112; (614) 538-1222 or (800) 837-1222; Fax (614) 538-0630.]

Computer Management and Development Services offers both turnkey systems and software only for the IBM AS/400 series of minicomputers. The operating system is OS/400 and the programming languages are RPG 400 and C++. The company sold two systems in 1990, bringing the total number of systems sold to six. One system was awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Sales of the library product were under $1 million but total sales of all educational software products fell in the $2.5 to $5 million range. The company as a whole claims to have made a profit. The company reported 32 people committed to software development and maintenance, and 33 to other customer support--figures which include the number of people committed to all educational products. All of the customers were using local cataloging, online patron access catalog, report generator, and word processing capabilities at the end of the year. Only 50% each were using the circulation, interlibrary loan, and BiblioFile interface capabilities. One-third had an OCLC interface. Three of the installations were supporting 8-15 terminals each; and three were supporting 2-7 terminals each. The major enhancements in 1990 were a rewrite of the software, and the introduction of an acquisitions module.

[Computer Management and Development Services, 1661 Virginia Avenue, Harrisonburg, VA 22801; (703) 432-5200 X302; Fax (703) 432-5275.]

COMSTOW Information Services offers software only, exclusively to special libraries. The product, known as BiblioTech, runs on Digital VAX, HP/Apollo, or Sun SPARC Station hardware using the VMS or Unix operating system, DRS DBMS under VMS, with programs in Empress under Unix. The company sold six new systems in 1990, bringing its total installations to 50, all in North America. Revenues were under $1 million, and due to heavy capital expenditures in 1990, the company expects only to break even for the year. All of the sites were using local cataloging, authority control, online patron access catalog, interlibrary loan, report generator, journal citation files, and inventorying at the end of 1990 Seventy percent were using circulation; 80% were using serials control; and half were using acquisitions. Approximately 25% were using an OCLC interface; and 10% a BiblioFile interface. Approximately 90% had a LAN interface; half had interfaces with other library systems of the same vendor; and 20% had a remote data base searching interface. All sites were using word processing. Three of the sites were supporting 30-60 terminals; seven had 16-29; 20 had 8-15; 13 had 2-7; and seven had just 1 terminal. These are terminals that are on the same network as library, but not dedicated to library software although all can access the online patron access catalog. The company had four persons devoted to software maintenance and development, and four committed to other customer support. Major enhancements included: a CD-ROM interface module; dynamic multi-user upload module; and Unix product development.

[Comstow Information Services, P.O. Box 277, 249 Ayer Road, Harvard, MA 01451-0277; (508) 772-2001; Fax (508) 772-9579.]

Cuadra Associates offers both turnkey systems and software packages for Unix-based Sun workstations and Alpha Micro computers. The company is planning to offer its software under AT&T Unix V in the near future. The programming language is 'C." The product, known as STAR, is not a traditional integrated library system.

It does not have modules. The basic software has been modified by clients to include acquisitions, serials control, circulation, and inventory. The company reported 44 sales in 1990, bringing its customer base to 150 in North America--200 worldwide. One system was awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of 1990. The company declined to provide revenue data, but claimed to have realized a profit in 1990. There are no statistics available on the applications implemented by clients, but approximately 15% use the MARC conversion program to draw records from any MARC source. Five of the users had 60-99 terminals; ten had 30-60; 35 had 16-29; 40 had 8-15; and ten had 2-7 terminals. Seven staff were committed to software development and maintenance, and two to other customer support. The major enhancement in 1990 was the port of the software to Suns SPARC systems, which use Sun's RISC processor. The company has offices in Washington, DC, New York, and Chicago, and authorized dealers in nine foreign countries.

[Cuadra Associates, Inc., 11835 W. Olympic, Suite 855, Los Angeles, CA 90064; (213) 478-0066; Fax (213) 477-1078.]

DataLib/Centel Federal Services Corporation offers software only for DEC VAX, Data General, and Unix-based hardware platforms. The operating systems are VMS for DEC, AOS/VS for Data General, and Unix V for a variety of hardware platforms. The company made six sales in 1990, bringing its total to 24 in North America, 26 worldwide. Two systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of 1990. Sales revenues were under $1 million for 1990, and there was an after-tax profit. Seven staff were committed to software development and maintenance, and seven to other customer support. All of the customers were using the local cataloging, authority control, online patron access catalog, and report generator software at the end of the year, while 70% each were using circulation and interlibrary loan. Serials control was in use at 60% of the sites; acquisitions at 50%; and journal citation files at 8%. An OCLC interface was in use at 42% of sites, and 8% had an RLIN interface. No information was available on the number of terminals in use at each site. The major enhancement in 1990 was the ability to export full-MARC records.

[DataLib/Centel Federal Services Corporation, 11400 Commerce Park Drive, Reston, VA 22091; (800) 843-4850; Fax (703) 758-7320.]

Data Research Associates markets ATLAS, an integrated automated library system, as a turnkey system or software package. It also offers a standalone library system for the blind and physically handicapped. ATLAS runs on Digital VAX hardware, uses VMS, OSF (in development), and the programming languages used are "C" and VAX Basic. DRA reported sales of 44 systems, bringing its installed base to 174 sites--163 in North America. Six systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. The company had gross sales between $10 and $20 million, and reported an after-tax profit. Local cataloging, authority control, and circulation were being used at all sites; 90% were using the online patron access catalog; 88% were using community information capabilities; 84% each were using acquisitions and serials control. Half of the sites were using inventorying; materials booking was in use by 40%, and interlibrary loan and report generator by 10% each. Eighty percent had an OCLC interface; 3% each a BiblioFile interface and an UTLAS interface; and 6% had WLN interface. Thirty-two percent had an interface with other systems from the same vendor; 25% had a local area network interface; and 40% had the remote data base searching interface. Over 20% were using word processing. Three sites were supporting over 400 terminals; seven had 200-399; 26 had 100-199; 23 had 60-99; 57 had 30-60; 31 had 16-19; 18 had 8-15; and nine had 2-7 terminals. A staff of 44 was committed to software maintenance and development and 22 to other customer support. Major enhancements were: new releases of major software modules; signed agreements with UMI, IAC, and Wilson for provision of their data bases; IAC network access becomes available; networked authority verification; journal citation software release; "fuzzy matching" software completed. DRA maintains offices in St. Louis, Richmond (VA) Toronto, Los Angeles, Salt Lake City, and Atlanta.

[Data Research Associates, Inc., 1276 North Warson Road, St. Louis, MC 63132-1806; (800) 325-0888 or (314) 432-1100; Fax (314) 993-8927.]

Dynix offers turnkey systems and software packages for a wide range of machines which use the Pick operating system. Its major hardware platforms are the IBM RS/6000 and MIPS. During 1990, the vendor reported sales of 229 systems, bringing its total to 453 worldwide--320 of them in North America. The sales figure appears to include upgrade sales as well as new sales. By subtracting last year's total number of installations from this year's, the net increase is 110 systems worldwide. At the end of the year, 61 systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance. Gross revenue from sales was over $30 million worldwide, and the company realized an after-tax profit for the year. All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, and the report generator; 95% were using circulation; 85% each were using the online patron access catalog and inventorying; 20% had acquisitions; 10% had community information; 5% each had journal citation files and serials control; and 2% had materials booking. Forty percent of the sites had an OCLC interface; 20% had a BiblioFile interface; 3% had a WLN interface; and 1% each an RLIN or UTLAS interface. Half had interfaces with other systems of the same vendor; 5% had remote data base searching interfaces; and 10% had LAN interfaces. Two sites had over 400 terminals; eight had 200-399 terminals; 30 had 100-199; 50 had 60-99; 68 had 30-60; 90 had 16-29; 105 had 8-15; and 100 had 2-7 terminals. The company had a staff of 48 committed to software maintenance and development, and 133 committed to other customer support. The major enhancement for 1990 was Release 130, including serials control, inventorying, media booking, and homebound modules for the first time. The company maintains offices in Singapore, London, Dublin, Waterloo (Canada) Auckland, and Boulogne (France).

[Dynix, 151 East 1700 South, Provo, UT 84601; (801) 375-2770; Fax (801) 373-1889.]

Gateway Software Corporation offers both turnkey systems and software only for the IBM AS/400 series of minicomputers. The operating system is OS/400 and the programming language is RPG 400. The company sold seven systems in 1990, bringing the total number of systems sold to eight. Four systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. The company reported gross sales of under $1 million, with an after-tax profit for the year. The company does not sell its Library Management System in modules. All of the sites were using local cataloging; and half each are using circulation, online patron access catalog, report generator, and interlibrary loan; and 28% each are using inventorying and acquisitions. Some 13% are using the BiblioFile interface capabilities; and all sites have word processing. One of the installations was supporting 60-99 terminals; another had 30-60; four had 16-29; and two had 2-7 terminals each. The company reported a staff of six was committed to software development and maintenance, and three to other customer support. The major enhancements in 1990 included: full Boolean search of keyword with a wild card feature; subject search (main subject headings and subject subdivisions); textbook management; and inventory.

[Gateway Software Corporation, 1645 Avenue D, Billings, MT 59102; (406) 256-9716; Fax (406) 245-0323.]

Gaylord Information Systems' integrated library system, GALAXY, introduced in 1989, is offered as both a turnkey system and as a software package. (Gaylord also markets SuperCAT--its CD-ROM, PC-based cataloging system--as well as continuing its support of approximately 25 service bureau customers who have DEC PDP-11 or Apple IIe local circulation control systems connected for overdue notice and report processing purposes.) The responses in this section are for the GALAXY product only. The hardware is Digital VAX using the VMS operating system, and MARC DBMS and the "C" programming language. The company sold 36 GALAXY systems during 1990, bringing the total installations to 36 (all in North America), with another five awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Revenues were between $5 and $10 million, and the company realized an after-tax profit. All of the sites were using local cataloging, circulation, and report generator. Six percent were using inventorying and interlibrary loan; and 92% had online patron access catalog. One site (3%) was using the OCLC interfacing capability, and two sites (6%) were using a LAN interface. One site supported 30-60 terminals; seven had 16-29; 19 had 8-15; and nine had 2-7. The company had a staff of 16 committed to software maintenance and development, and 17 committed to other customer support. Major enhancements during 1990 were the authority control, reserve book room, OCLC online interface, portable inventory/backup unit, "foreign" barcode support, and BISAC electronic order interface. Gaylord maintains offices in Liverpool (NY), LaPlata (MD), Sandy (UT), Philadelphia, and Cleveland Heights (OH).

[Gaylord Information Systems, P.O. Box 4901, Syracuse, NY 13221-4901; (800) 962-9580; Fax (315) 451-4760.]

Geac offers turnkey systems using its own hardware platform, operating system, and programming language (designated as GLIS) and a second product which uses the Pick operating system and capable of running on a variety of hardware platforms (designated as Advance). The vendor reported sales of 25 systems during 1990, all of them Advance systems. All of the GLIS sales were upgrades to existing customers' systems. The total number of systems installed worldwide at the end of 1990 was 253, with 136 of the systems in North America; 53 were the newer Advance product. There were five systems awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Sales of library products were between $10 and $15 million, and Geac projects an after-tax profit. All of the GLIS customers have installed circulation, local cataloging, and report generator. The online patron access catalog is in use at 80%; acquisitions and serials control were each being used at 70%; and community information at 10%. Half of the sites were using authority control; interlibrary loan and materials booking were each used at 20% of the sites. Sixty percent of the sites were using online interfaces to OCLC; 20% each were using the UTLAS or RLIN interface; 20% each were also claimed to be using the BiblioFile and 10% had WLN interface. (There was no explanation for the 140% total for the cataloging support system interfaces.) Thirty percent of the sites were using a LAN interface, and 40% had interfaces with other library systems from the same vendor Twenty percent were using the word processing module. Six users were using more than 400 terminals; 20 had 200-399 terminals each; 60 had 100-199; and 20 had 60- 99; and the rest had fewer terminals. The company had a staff of 32 committed to GLIS software maintenance/development and customer support, down from 86 people in 1987. Major enhancements for 1990 included: multi-threaded circulation and keyword, Boolean, and authority enhancements to the online patron access catalog module. Of the Advance customers, all were using local cataloging, authority control, online patron access catalog, and report generator at the end of 1990. Circulation and interlibrary loan were used by 70%; and acquisitions was in use at 2%. Thirty percent were using an OCLC interface, and 2% each an UTLAS or WLN interface. Twelve percent were using a BiblioFile interface. Six percent were using an interface to another library system by the same vendor, and 2% had a LAN interface. Six percent were using word processing. Three sites had 100-199 terminals; eight had 60-99; 20 had 30-60; 18 had 16-29; three had 8-15; and one had 2-7 terminals. The major enhancements made in 1990 were the acquisitions and serials control modules. The company has offices in Alexandria (VA) , Seattle, Paris, Bristol, Frankfurt, Sydney, and Toronto.

[Geac Computers Ltd., Suite 300, 11 Allstate Parkway, Markham, Ontario L3R lB3 Canada; (416) 475-0525; Fax (416) 475- 3847.]

Georgetown University Library In formation System offers software only for Digital hardware. The operating systems are VMS M/VX from InterSystems (VAX) and M11+ from InterSystems. Two packages were sold, bringing its total to 40 in North America. One package was awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of 1990. Sales were reported to be under $1 million, with no after-tax profit. Acquisitions, local cataloging, authority control, circulation, serials control, online patron access control, and report generator modules were being used at all sites; and 18% were using the journal citation files. All sites had both OCLC and LAN interfaces; and 4% had a BiblioFile interface. Word processing was in use at all sites. Ten sites were supporting 30-60 terminals; nine had 16-19; six had 8-15; and one had 2-7 terminals. Eight people were committed to software maintenance and development, and one is committed to other customer support. Major enhancements included: the release of an optional reserve room module, enhancements to the optional journal citation module, and a CD-ROM-based back-up system.

[Georgetown University Library Systems, Library Information Systems (LIS), Georgetown University Medical Center, 3900 Reservoir Road, N.W., Washington, DC 20007; (202) 687-1035; Fax (202) 687-1703.]

IBM DOBIS offers software only for hardware based on the IBM 370 architecture. The operating systems are MVS/SP, CICS, and VSE, and the programming languages are PL/1 and Assembler. IBM sold 23 systems during 1990, and supported a total of 187 systems worldwide--23 in North America. IBM DOBIS is not itemized on the company's annual statement; sales and profit information wa not available. All sites were using acquisitions, local cataloging, authority control, circulation, serials control, online patron access catalog, report generator and inventorying modules. All sites had an OCLC interface; and 4% each also had an RLIN interface, a BiblioFile interface, and a LAN interface. The estimated number of sites of each size (number of terminals) was not available, but the average is 74. The company could not identify the number of staff committed to software maintenance and development and other customer support at the end of 1990. The IBM DOBIS/LIBIS support center is located in Dublin, Ireland.

[IBM Library Marketing, 472 Wheeler Farms Road, Milford, CT 06460; (203) 783-7350.]

IME Systems, Inc. offers turnkey systems and software only for all sizes of machines, with Unix the operating system for larger systems, and MS-DOS for PCs. The programming languages are "C" and 4GL. The company realized sales of $1 to $2.5 million in 1990 and achieved an after-tax profit. The company sold 250 systems of which 25 are believed to be multi-user systems of 16 or more users mounted on IBM RS/6000 platforms, bringing the total installations to 157 multi-user systems worldwide-one in North America. While the majority of the vendor's installations have been configured on PCs, often on local area networks, the vendor is a major player in the multi-user market; therefore, its report is included with multi-user systems. Approximately 90% of the systems installed had local cataloging and authority control operational at the end of 1990; 60% had serials control; 45% had journal citation files; 40% each had circulation, report generator, and inventorying. Acquisitions was in use at 30% of the sites; 20% had online patron access catalog; 15% had materials booking; and 10% had interlibrary loan. Over 60% had an OCLC interface; 35% had a LAN interface; and 10% had an interface to other systems from the same vendor. Ten percent had remote data base searching; and 15% were using word processing. Two of the sites had 100-199 terminals; five had 60-99; 25 had 30-60; 125 had 16-29; 458 had 8-15; 200 had 2-7; and 35 had only 1 terminal. The major enhancements in 1990 were the introduction of the patron access catalog module and enhancements to the serials control module. Distributed processing was introduced, with DOS workstations operating off a Unix central server. The company has 11 staff devoted to software maintenance and development, and 10 devoted to other customer support. There are offices in London and Dedham (MA), and distributors in several other countries.

[IME Systems, Inc., 990 Washington Street, Dedham, MA 02026; (617) 320-0303; Fax (617) 320-0793.]

Information Dimensions, Inc., offers software only. The product, known as TECHLIBplus, runs on VAX, IBM, HP, Unisys, and Sun mainframes and minis. The operating systems are VMS for Digital VAX, MVS and VM for IBM, and Ultrix and Unix. The company sold 40 new packages during 1990, bringing the total number of installations to 190 worldwide. Five systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Revenues were in the $25 to $30 million range, and there was an after-tax profit for the year. All of the sites were using acquisitions, local cataloging, online patron access catalog, inventorying, circulation, and report generator modules. Half of the sites were using authority control, serials control, and interlibrary loan modules. An OCLC interface was in use at 50% of the sites; and 10% had an RLIN interface. Half of the sites had remote data base searching and interface with other library systems from the same vendor; and 10% were using a LAN interface. Five sites supported over 400 terminals; 10 had 200-399; 10 had 100-199; 95 had 60-99; 33 had 16-29; 11 had 8-15; 21 had 2-7; and four had only 1 terminal. A staff of 80 were committed to software maintenance and development, and 90 were committed to other customer support. Major enhancements during 1990 included a new version of Techlib--TECHLIBplus was introduced in January 1990 with full relational data base management system capabilities.

[Information Dimensions, Inc., 655 Metro Place South, Suite 500, Dublin, OH 43017-1396; (614) 761-8300; Fax (614) 761-7290.]

INLEX offers turnkey systems and software packages for the entire line of Hewlett-Packard 3000 series computers. The operating system is MPE or MPE/XL, and the programming languages are PASCAL and "C." The company reported sales of 26 turnkey systems and packages, bringing its total number of installed and accepted systems to 84--83 in North America. Fifteen were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Sales were between $10 and $20 million, with an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, and report generator modules; 95% each were using circulation and interlibrary loan; 80% were using the online patron access catalog; 20% were using inventorying; and 20% were using acquisitions. One percent had the community information module operational. All sites had a BiblioFile interface; over 60% had an OCLC interface; 20% had an WLN interface; and 10% had the RLIN interface, and 5% had interfaces with other systems of the same vendor. Ten percent had an LC CD-ROM authorities system interface. Half of the sites were using word processing. The sites included one with 200-399 terminals; four with 100-199; 17 with 60-99; 26 with 30-60; 22 with 16-29; and 14 with 8-15 terminals. A staff of 11.5 FTE were committed to software maintenance and development, and 13.5 FTE were committed to other customer support. Major enhancements in 1990 were: the completion of acquisitions; completion of new editing capability; and completion of the report generator. The company maintains offices in San Diego, Wooster (OH), Philadelphia, Westport (CT), Vancouver, and Sydney.

[INLEX, Inc., P.O. Box 1349, 656 Munras Avenue, Monterey, CA 93940; (408) 646-9666; Fax (408) 646-0651.]

Innovative Interfaces offers both turnkey systems and software packages. The hardware is Unisys/Convergent, MIPS, DEC VAX or most other Unix machines since the operating system is Unix. The programming languages are PASCAL and "C." The company usually bids Unisys Convergent computers when offering a turnkey solution, but it recently has begun offering MIPS for larger systems. Its software only sales tend to be on Digital VAX equipment. The company sold SO systems, bringing its total number of sales to 196--l95 of them in North America. There were 40 systems awaiting installation and/or acceptance. Revenues were in the $20 to $25 million range, with an after-tax profit. All of the sites had a report generator module; 80% each had acquisitions and serials control; 60% had local cataloging; 50% had online patron access catalog; and 50% each had authority control, circulation, and online patron access catalog. Three percent had journal citation files; and 1% each had inventorying and community information. Some 70% had an OCLC interface; 10% an REIN interface; 5% a UTLAS interface; and 1% each had a BiblioFile and WLN interface. Thirty percent had a local area network interface; 5% had interfaces with other library systems from the same vendor; and 3% had a remote data base searching interface. Two of the sites had 200-399 terminals; six had 100-199; 20 had 60-99; 40 had 30-60; 50 had 16-29; 50 had 8- 15; and 32 had 2-7 terminals. A staff of 16 was committed to software maintenance and development at the end of the year, and 34 were committed to other customer support. Major enhancements included: journal citation files and inventorying; holds on first copy returned to a specific location; CJK support; materials booking; and electronic mail.

[Innovative Interfaces, Inc., 2344 Sixth Street, Berkeley, CA 94710; (415) 644-3600; Fax (415) 644-3650.]

International Library Systems offers software only for both PC-based and multi-user systems. The product is known as Sydney. The operating systems are MS-DOS for PCs and VMS for DEC VAX. The company did not indicate the number of sales in 1990, but claims its worldwide customer base is more than 400-300 in North America. Half are believed to be multi-user systems. Total revenues were between $1 and $2.5 million, with an after-tax profit. All sites were using local cataloging, authority control, and online patron access catalog at the end of 1990. Some 81% were ing circulation; 79% were using serials control; and 77% were using acquisitions. All ILS interface software is bundled together in a single module, with 84% of sites using it at the end of 1990. Nearly half had a LAN interface. There were 58 libraries with 8-15 terminals; 185 with 2-7; and 15 with only 1 terminal. No report was given for the other sites. A staff of 12 was committed to software maintenance and development at the end of the year, and eight were committed to other customer support. The major development effort in 1990 was a porting of the software to the Unix operating system. The new product is expected to be available in 1991. The company maintains offices in Vancouver, Ottawa, Toronto, Los Angeles, and New York.

[International Library Systems, Corp., 320 - 2600 Granville Street, Vancouver, British Columbia; V6H 3V3 Canada; (604) 734-8882; Fax (604) 734-8854.]

Multicore Library Services, known better in Canada as the SOBECO Group, Inc, offers both turnkey systems and software packages. The major hardware environments are Digital VAX, NCR Tower, and MIPS. The first uses the VMS operating system, and the other two the Unix operating system. The programming languages are PASCAL and "C." The company reported selling 34 systems during 1990, bringing its total to 109--104 in North America. Four of the systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Gross sales were between $5 and $10 million, and the company realized an after-tax profit. Ninety-five percent of the sites were using local cataloging; and 90% were using authority control; 72% were using the online patron access catalog; 47% were using circulation; and 31% were using acquisitions. One percent each were using serials control, interlibrary loan, and inventorying; and 5% were using the report generator. Ten percent were using an OCLC interface; 8% an UTLAS interface; and 20% a BiblioFile interface. Ten percent had interfaces with other systems from the same vendor; 2% had a LC CD-ROM authorities interface; and 5% had a LAN interface. Two percent were using remote data base searching, and 20% were using word processing. Three sites had 200-399 terminals; five had 60-99; ten had 30-60; 12 had 16-29; 33 had 8-15; and 46 had 2-7 terminals. Eleven staff were committed to software maintenance and development, and 20 were committed to other customer support. Major enhancements during the year included a new circulation module with windowing, improved indexing, support of the full ALA character set on off-the-shelf terminals, and a graphically oriented calendar. The company has offices in Quebec, Toronto, Montreal, Watertown (MA), Columbus, and Paris.

[Multicore Library Services, 4924 Reed Road, Bldg. A, Columbus, OH 43220; (800) 753-0053; Fax (614) 459-6864; or Sobeco, 505 Rene-Levesque Blvd. West, Montreal, Quebec H2Z 1Y7 Canada; (514) 878-9090; Fax (514) 875-2673.]

NOTIS offers both turnkey systems and software packages. The NOTIS Library Management System (LMS) is a software-only product, comprising a complete, integrated package for library automation running on all models of IBM System 370 platform. The LMS may be installed on a dedicated or a shared machine. Source code is provided to allow total flexibility. KeyNOTIS--announced in late 1989--is a bundled hardware/software product, providing the functionality of the LMS running on an IBM 9370 configuration; KeyNOTIS does not require programmer support. The operating systems are MVS or VSE with CICS. The code is in Basic Assembler and PL/l. Fifteen sales were made in 1990, bringing the total worldwide installations to 145--140 in North America. Three of the system installations in 1990 were KeyNOTIS. Sales were in the $5 to $10 million range, and the company reported an after-tax profit. Approximately 97% of sites were using local cataloging and online patron access catalog; 83% each were using authority control and circulation; 72% were using acquisitions; 65% were using serials control; and 21% were using journal citation files. An OCLC interface was in use at 78% of sites; an RLIN interface at 10%; and an UTLAS interface at 1%. Journal citation files may be mounted using the Multiple Database Access System (MDAS) - This separately priced software permits the loading of reference and local data bases on the local NOTIS computer with the ability to configure record displays and help screens for each data base through an online, menu-driven program. Fifteen of the sites had over 400 terminals; 26 had 200-399; 31 had 100-299; 24 had 60-99; 19 had 30-60; 12 had 16-29; and four had 8-15. A staff of 40 was committed to software maintenance and development, and 21 were committed to other customer support at the end of 1990. Major enhancements in 1990 included: an interface to LC CD-ROM-based MARC data bases; redesign of the patron access catalog, including new menus and displays, cross references, and call number index; support for the common command language; USMARC format for holdings; online currency conversion; and a number of improved editing capabilities. The company maintains offices in Evanston (IL), Dallas, San Diego, and Philadelphia.

[NOTIS Systems, Inc., 1007 Church Street, 2nd Floor, Evanston, IL 60201; (708) 866- 0150; Fax (708) 866-0178.]

NSC, Inc., offers software only for minicomputer-based systems using the IBM OS/400 or Wang VS operating system. The programming languages are RPG 400 and RPG II. The hardware platforms are the IBM AS/400, IBM 5/38, and the Wang VS line. The company made three sales in 1990, bringing its total to 22. Three systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. Total sales were under $1 million, and the company did not disclose whether it is profitable. Some 86% of the sites were using local cataloging, authority control, circulation, and interlibrary loan at the end of the year. Half were using acquisitions and serials control; and 40% were using the online patron access catalog module. Inventorying was in use at 30%; and serials booking at 25%. Thirty percent had an OCLC interface; 30% an LC CD-ROM authorities interface; and 20% a BiblioFile interface. Two sites had 200-399 terminals; two had 100-199; three had 16-29; 10 had 8-15; and five had 2-7 terminals. A total of five persons were committed to software maintenance and development, and five to other customer support. Major enhancement during 1990 included: improved OPAC, keyword search capabilities, additional reporting, and processing features.

[NSC, Inc., 428 West Ryan Street, Brillion, WI 54110; (414) 756-5305 or (800) 624- 5720; Fax (414) 756-2359.]

Ringgold Management Systems, Inc., offers both turnkey systems and software packages. The product runs on PCs and supermicros, and the operating systems are DOS, Unix, and XENIX. The programming languages are "C", COBOL, and BASIC. The company made eight sales during 1990. Its installed base consisted of 38 sites worldwide (all but one in North America). The company reported gross revenues under $1 million, and expected to realize an after-tax profit. Sixty-one percent of the sites were using acquisitions; and 45% were using circulation. An OCLC interface was in use at 45% of the sites; WLN was at 5%; and a local area network interface was in use at 29% of the sites. Two of the sites had 16-29 terminals; seven had 8-15; 14 had 2-7; and 15 had only 1 terminal. One person was committed to software maintenance and development, and .5 FTE to other customer service. Major enhancements made in 1990 included custom interface to other systems and use of magnetic patron cards.

[Ringgold Management Systems, Inc., Box 368, Beaverton, OR 97075-0369; (503) 645-3502; Fax (503) 690-6642.]

The SIRSI Corporation offers turnkey systems and software packages for a variety of Unix-based machines, including Unisys, NCR, Arix, HP, Digital, IBM, and Sequent. Lately, it has tended to bid the Unisys 5000 series. The operating systems are Unix and XENIX; the data base management system is BRS/Search; and the programming language is "C." The company sold 43 turnkey systems and packages during 1990, bringing its total installed base to 81--79 in North America. Seventeen systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at the end of the year. The company reported that its sales figures were not available (but probably fall in the $1 to $2.5 million range), and the company claimed to have realized an after-tax profit. All of the sites were using local cataloging, inventorying, and a report generator. Serials control was in use at 84%; 83% w&> using acquisitions; 75% each were using authority control and community information; 72% were using circulation; 70% were using online patron access catalog; and 40% were using interlibrary loan; and media booking was in use at 3%. A BiblioFile interface was in use at 95% of the sites; an OCLC interface at 81%; and WLN was at 1%. Some 80% had remote data base searching. A local area network interface was in use at 6% of The sites, and 50% had interfacing with other library systems from the same vendor. Two of the sites were supporting 60-99 terminals; six were supporting 30-60 terminals; 10 had 16-29; 24 had 8-15; 35 had 2-7; and four had 1 terminal. Five staff were committed to software development and maintenance and 13 to other customer support. Major enhancements for 1990 included significant enhancements to OPAC and RIM (retrieval interface manager) . The company maintains offices in England and Canada as well as US.

[SIRSI Corporation, 110 Walker Avenue, Huntsville, AL 35801-9806; (205) 536-5884; Fax (205) 536-8345.]

TKM Software Limited offers only software packages. The product, known as BuCAT, uses Digital VAX hardware. The operating system is VMS with a proprietary data base, and the programming languages are "C" and PL/l. The company reported no sales during 1990, bringing its total to 16--down from 25 reported in 1989. The company reported gross sales of under $1 million, and did achieve an after-tax profit. The company reported all of its sites were using local cataloging and on-line patron access catalog; and 20% each were using inventorying and circulation. All sites were using a BiblioFile and UTLAS interface. The company reported having four people committed to software maintenance and development, and one committed to other customer support.

[TKM Software Limited, Box 1525, Brandon, Manitoba R7A 6N3 Canada; (204) 727-3873; Fax (204) 727-3338.]

Unisys Corporation offers turnkey systems configured around the Unisys 1100/2200 machines. The product, known as PALS, uses the 0S1100 and DMS 1100 operating systems with the COBOL programming language. Unisys PC-based library product was transferred to the Europe-Africa division in 1990 and is not reflected in this survey, as it had been in 1989. The company reported sales of four systems during the year, bringing its total to 34--25 in North America. The company reports revenues of $10 to $20 million and did realize an after-tax profit. All of the sites were using the online patron access catalog; 80% were using circulation; 60% had report generator; 44% had local cataloging; 42% were using acquisitions; and 39% had serials control. Community information was in use at 7% of the sites; 30% had interlibrary loan; and 3% each had inventorying and authority control. Forty-four percent of the systems had the OCLC interface; 12% had a BiblioFile interface; and 6% were using the remote data base searching interface. Three percent had LC-CD authorities interface; and 18% had a LAN interface. Sixty percent were using word processing. Nine sites had over 400 terminals; two had 200-399 terminals; six had 100-199; four had 60-99; one had 30-60; nine had 16-29; and three had 8-15. A staff of 16 was committed to software maintenance and development, and 16 to other customer support. Major enhancements included the addition of authority control module; PALS to PALS connectivity gateway; and diacritic support.

[Unisys Corporation, P.O. Box 500, M/S B-28l Blue Bell, PA 19424; (215) 986-4023; Fax (215) 986-5005.]

USTI/Municipal Software offers turnkey systems configured around the IBM S/36 and AS/400 hardware. The product uses the IBM SSP on the S/36 and OS/400 on AS/400 operating systems, written in RPG programming language. The company reported the sale of one system during the year, bringing its total to 15--all in North America. The company reports having realized revenues of under $1 million and realized an after-tax profit. The company reported the following in use at an undisclosed percentage of sites: online patron access catalog; report generator; circulation; local cataloging; and acquisitions. The number of terminals at each site is not maintained by USTI. Twenty-two staff were committed to software maintenance and development, and five staff were committed to other customer support. There were no major enhancements in 1990--they are planned for 1991.

[USTI/Municipal Software, 3021 Gateway Drive, Suite 290, Irving, TX 75063; (214) 518-0728; Fax (214) 580-8280.]

Utlas offers turnkey systems and software packages for Tandem computers. The system uses Tandem's Guardian operating system. The programming language is COBOL. One new system and three total system replacements were sold in 1989, bringing the total installations to 14--13 in North America. There were no sales reported for 1990. Total revenues were between $2.5 and $5 million in 1989. Figures for 1990 were not available because the sale of the company was in negotiation. All sites were using local cataloging, circulation, report generator, and inventorying at the end of 1989. The online patron access catalog was in use at half of the sites; 30% had authority control; and 20% had materials booking. None of the sites had acquisitions, serials control, interlibrary loan, journal citation files, or community information. Half of the sites had an OCLC interface. RLIN and BiblioFile interfaces were each in use at 10%; and three percent had an UTLAS interface. Half of the sites had interfaces with other library systems from the same vendor; and 20% had a LAN interface. Eight sites were supporting 200-399 terminals; two had 100-199; one had 30-60; and three had 16-29 terminals. Nine, people were committed to software maintenance and development, and eight were committed to other customer support.

[Utlas International, 80 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario MSS 2Vl Canada; (416) 923-0890; or 8300 College Blvd., Overland Park, KS 66210; (800) 33 UTLAS; Fax (913) 451-3111.1

VTLS offers both turnkey systems and software packages using Hewlett-Packard series 3000 and IBM computers. The operating system is MPE/MPE-XL and Image on HP, and VM SQL/OS on IBM, written in COBOL II. The company reported selling 17 systems during 1990, bringing its total to 130--90 in North America. Two systems were awaiting installation and/or acceptance at year's end. The organization's gross sales were between $2.5 and $5 million, and it did realize an after-tax profit. The company reported that all of its sites were using local cataloging, online patron access catalog, and report generator capabilities; 98% were using circulation; 94% had authority control; 73% used serials control; 38% used acquisitions; 12% had journal citation files; 10% had materials booking; and 1% used community information. Some 52% were using the OCLC interface; 12% had the WLN interface; 2% had the RLIN interface; and 1% had the BiblioFile interface. A local area network interface was used by 30%; and an interface to other systems by the same vendor by 45%. Nine sites were supporting 100-199 terminals; 17 had 60-99; 30 had 30-60; 30 had 16-29; 22 had 8-15; and 11 had 2-7 terminals. VTLS reported that a staff of 16 were committed to software maintenance and development, and 16 to other customer support. Major enhancements during the year included: several software products and services developed have given VTLS OPAC a new appeal and versatility. The Intelligent Workstation (VTLS-IW), a microcomputer-based front end to the OPAC and the VTLS InfoStation (VTLS-IS), a multimedia information access system, both provide a powerful and user-friendly environment for online catalog searching and retrieval of data. Another product, the VTLS Remote Interface Manager (VTLS-RIM) provides access to data published on CD-ROMs and allows VTLS users to connect directly to the OCLC network and search the OCLC Online Union Catalog. Further, agreements with the H.W. Wilson Company, Information Access Company (IAC), and UMI/Data Courier now allow VTLS patrons unlimited direct access to those companies indexes stored in locally-mounted data bases. Finally, the New VTLS Journal Indexing subsystem allows librarians to create indexing records for publications and allows patrons to search an indexing data base for indexed articles. VTLS maintains offices in Blacksburg (VA), Barcelona, and Helsinki.

[VTLS, 1800 Kraft Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24060; (703) 231-3637; Fax (703) 231-3648.]

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View Citation
Publication Year:1991
Type of Material:Article
Language English
Published in: Library Systems Newsletter
Publication Info:Volume 11 Number 03
Issue:March 1991
Page(s):17-30
Publisher:American Library Association
Place of Publication:Chicago, IL
Notes:Howard S. White, Editor-in-Chief; Richard W. Boss, Contributing Editor
Company: Advanced Computer Concepts
epixtech, inc.
Ameritech Library Services
CARL Corporation
Carlyle Systems, Inc.
CLSI
CoBIT
Computer Management and Development Services
Comstow Information Services
Cuadra Associates, Inc.
DataLib/Centel Federal Services Corporation
Data Research Associates, Inc.
Dynix Systems, Inc.
Gateway Software Corporation
Gaylord Information Systems
Geac
IBM Corporation
Information Dimensions, Inc.
Open Text Corporation
INLEX, Inc.
Innovative Interfaces, Inc.
International Library Systems Corporation
Multicore Library Services, Inc.
Sobeco Group
NOTIS Systems, Inc.
NSC, Inc.
Ringgold Management Systems, Inc.
SIRSI Corporation
TKM Software, Ltd.
Unisys
Municipal Software
USTI/Municipal Software
UTLAS Corporation
VTLS, Inc.
GIS Information Systems
Products: LS/2000
ACQ350
SC350
LS/2
Carl
LIBS 100
The Library Machine
Bibliotech
STAR
ATLAS
Library Management System
Galaxy
SuperCAT
Advance
GLIS
DOBIS
TINLIB
T Series
TECHLIBplus
Inlex/3000
INNOPAC
Sydney Library System
MultiLIS
NOTIS
Unicorn
BuCAT
PALS Automated Library System
VTLS
DRA
Subject: Library automation systems -- directories
ISSN:0277-0288
Record Number:5216
Last Update:2022-08-06 22:47:39
Date Created:0000-00-00 00:00:00
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