Library Technology Guides

Documents, Databases, News, and Commentary

Library Technology Guides provides comprehensive and objective information surrounding the many different types of technology products and services used by libraries. It covers the organizations that develop and support library-oriented software and systems. The site offers extensive databases and document repositories to assist libraries as they consider new systems and is an essential resource for professionals in the field to stay current with new developments and trends. Relevent news items are posted daily on Twitter:

GuidePosts

Perspective and commentary by Marshall Breeding

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Participate in the 2014 International Library Automation Perceptions Survey

Photo of Marshall Breeding author of GuidePosts

Please respond to this year's International Library Automation Survey conducted through Library Technology Guides. The survey measures the levels of satisfaction that libraries have in their strategic technology products and their perceptions of the quality of service and support that they receive. The results of this survey provide valuable information to libraries as they formulate technology strategies and to vendors as they refine their support services and product development.

Reports that summarize the findings from each of the previous surveys are available:

2014 Library Automation Survey

I am now collecting responses for the 2014 edition of the survey. Please take this opportunity to register the perceptions of the library automation system used in your library, its vendor, and the quality of support delivered. The survey also probes at considerations for migrating to new systems, involvement in discovery products, and the level of interest in open source ILS. While the numeric rating scales support the statistical results of the study, the comments offered also provide interesting insights into the current state of library automation satisfaction.

Note: If you have responded to previous editions of the survey, please give your responses again this year. By responding to the survey each year, you help identify long-term trends in the changing perceptions of these companies and products.

As with the previous versions of the survey, only one response per library is allowed and any individual can respond only for one library. These restrictions ensure that no single organization or individual can skew the statistics. While all the individuals that work in a library may have their own opinions, please respond to the extent that you can from the general experiences of your library.

How to participate

The survey links each response to the listing for a library in the lib-web-cats directory. This connection provides the ability to correlate responses with the extensive library demographic data in libraries.org.

  1. Find your library in libraries.org:
    Find your library:
    (hint: for public libraries, enter city or county)
  2. Select and view the listing for your library
  3. Press the button
  4. Complete the form and write in your comments!

When viewing the entry for your library in lib-web-cats, please check for any incomplete or inaccurate information and let me know of any needed changes.

If your library isn't listed in lib-web-cats, please submit its information.


Oct 21, 2014 20:12:10

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APIs Unify Library Services

In my Systems Librarian column for the April 2014 issue of Computers in Libraries I address the topic of application programming interfaces (APIs) and how they can be used to extend an application or to assist in making connections with external systems. The availability of APIs has become increasingly important to libraries as they seek to be do more with their strategic applications than possible through the built-in user interfaces. This column is meant to be a basic introduction to the topic and to spark ideas on how libraries can improve their services by taking advantage of APIs.

Computers in Libraries April 2014

Most libraries today rely on many different software applications and content services to support their internal operations and their services to patrons. Smaller libraries may deal with a handfiil of these platforms, while larger ones tend to be involved with dozens or hundreds, often with overlapping spheres of functionality or data. Such a matrix of interrelated products and services brings considerable complexity as libraries manage each separately, while attempting to fit them into a coherent technology strategy. In dealing with these multiple and diverse services, libraries benefit from any technologies or mechanisms that can be used to make them work together effectively and to exploit their capabilities to meet local concerns. One of these mechanisms comes in the form of APIs. The increasing availability of APIs among the major applications used by libraries represents an important advancement in technology with many potential benefits. continue reading...

(The full text of my Systems Librarian columns are available on Library Technology Guides 90 days following thier original publication in Computers in Libraries magazine.)

Oct 10, 2014 03:10:02

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New Resource available in Library Technology Guides: ILS implementations by Carnegie Classification

One of the key components of Library Technology Guides is the libraries.org (formerly lib-web-cats) directory of libraries that provides details about libraries and the major technology products they use. This resource can be used to identify and assess the adoption patterns of systems used among any given group of libraries. The advanced search provides the ability to select libraries according to geographic categories, collection size, library type, and other factors. I had previously created specialized reports for groups of particular interest such as the members of the Association of Research Libraries, the Urban Libraries Council, and the Association of Southeastern Research Libraries.

An additional tool is now available that produces reports of academic libraries in the United States and their automation systems according to the Carnegie Classification Levels of their parent institutions. This capability was made possible through the extension of the data elements for of the entries for academic libraries in the United States.

By default, the initial report shown corresponds to the Doctoral/Research Universities-Extensive (classification level 15). A drop-down list allows you to select any of the other classification reports.

The reports derived from some of the classification groups will include libraries where the ILS used is missing. Most of these represent libraries that were newly added to the libraries.org database. Any help in identifying the automation systems used in this libraries will be appreciated.

The data for the academic libraries was enhanced by loading selected data elements from the 2012 data set available from the National Center for Educational Statistics. This process involved creating a delimited file with the data, matching existing records based on the NCES institutional identifier that was already present on most of the entries for academic libraries in the United States.

Record elements loaded included:

UNITIDUnique NCES identifier used as the match point
INSTNMInstitution Name
ADDRAddress, used if a new record needs to be created
CITYCity, used if a new record needs to be created
STABBRState, used if a new record needs to be created
ZIPPostal Code. used if a new record needs to be created
WEBADDRURL for institution web site
SECTORdescribes whether the institution is public or private, for-profit or non-profit.
CARNEGIE2000 Carnegie Classification
BRANCHES Number of branch and independent libraries (exclude main or central library)
EXTOTTotal expenditures
EXCOMPExpenditures for computer hardware and software
EXCUSERExpenditures for current serial subscriptions
EXELSERExpenditures for electronic serials
EXBKSExpenditures for books, serial backfiles and other materials
EXELBKSExpenditures for electronic Books, electronic serial backfiles and other electronic materials
COLBKSHBooks, serial backfiles and other paper materials
CRGENGeneral circulation transactions
ICLEVELLevel of Institution
FTEUSED Fall Collection full-time equivalent student enrollment

These additional data elements display on each entry and some have been enabled as search terms. The selection according to Carnegie Classification is the most interesting example. In the future I will enable selection by for-profit / non-profit and private vs. public institutions, once data for other records beyond the academic libraries in the United States is more fully populated.

New records were created if they didn't already exist in the libraries.org database. Data were merged if a unique match was identified.

The NCES data on expenditures reported for each library provides some insight into technology budgets for each library or across categories of libraries. The reports calculate the aggregate and average total expenditures and those directed to technology. This data enables the calculation of the average percentage allocated to technology for each classification level.

The NCES data set of 4,262 libraries included 1,622 that were not previously represented in libraries.org. A few of these were smaller academic libraries that I had not previously come across, but the majority were those associated with for-profit educational institutions that I had intentionally not included since few of these offer traditional libraries. The addition of these libraries will enable some interesting comparisons.

The match and overlay of a data set such as this naturally requires a bit of clean up. Some duplicate records were created. I have identified and merged those that I initially identified and will fix others as I make a more systematic sweep of this section of the database.

The ILS Reports by Carnegie Classifications is based on the basic classifications published in 2000 that were included in the NCES data set. Work is underway to load the basic classifications published in 2010 that the Carnegie Foundation makes available.

Aug 13, 2014 10:25:57

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Caveat and Credit

Library Technology Guides was created and is edited by Marshall Breeding. He is solely responsible for all content on this site, and for any errors it may contain. Please notify him if you find any errors or omissions.

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Industry News

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Full Automation News Report

20 most recent items:


October 30, 2014. Kiowa County District Library goes live on CLiC AspenCat LibLime Union Catalog. The Kiowa County District Library is now live on the AspenCat LibLime Koha union catalog for all collection and patron management services. With the accumulation of Center Consolidated Schools, the CL ... <<more>>


October 30, 2014. City of Pasadena Public Library and Glendale Library, Arts and Culture Department select the Sierra Library Services Platform. Innovative announced that City of Pasadena Public Library and Glendale Library, Arts and Culture Department selected the Sierra Library Services Platform. CPPL contains over 700,000 volumes and GLACD ... <<more>>


October 30, 2014. Springer signs on as principal sponsor of Trans-Tasman 3MT. Springer is the principal sponsor of the 2014 Trans-Tasman Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, which challenges students pursuing higher education degrees to turn their theses into three minute pr ... <<more>>


October 29, 2014. Springer and Peerage of Science team up to ease journal submission. Springer has joined forces with Peerage of Science to help authors more easily submit their manuscripts for consideration in Springer journals. Both sides are looking at how they can make the process ... <<more>>


October 29, 2014. Library of Congress renews agreement with Backstage for large-scale microfilming project. The Preservation Reformatting Division within the Library of Congress has renewed its agreement with Backstage Library Works (www.bslw.com) and is moving forward on an extensive microfilming project. ... <<more>>


October 29, 2014. ResourceMate introduces Reading Program Service Lexile Framework for Reading and Accelerated Reader integration into ResourceMate Extended and Premium. Jaywil Software Dev. Inc.ís Instant access to Lexile scores and Accelerated Reader information. There is no need to export data to have it processed. When you add an item the scores are automatically ... <<more>>


October 28, 2014. Arab World Research Source now available from EBSCO. EBSCO Information Services has introduced Arab World Research Source, a full-text database that delivers the coverage needed by researchers of Arab Studies, Middle Eastern Studies and Islamic Studies. ... <<more>>


October 28, 2014. Utah State University joins leading institutions to modernize grant and research management with KualiCo. KualiCo, an open source software company focused on the delivery of administrative solutions for higher education, announced today Utah State University has selected Cloud Enterprise for Grant and Res ... <<more>>


October 28, 2014. Bibliotheca launch strategic partnership for South Korean market. Bibliotheca today announces an exciting new strategic partnership that will bring the breadth of their library solutions directly to the South Korean market. Continuing with its focus on the internati ... <<more>>


October 28, 2014. TU Delft selects OCLC WorldShare Management Services. Delft University of Technology, one of the world's leading technical universities, has selected OCLC WorldShare Management Services as its library management system. ... <<more>>


October 28, 2014. University Libraries in Hong Kong add value to their collections with digital access to South China Morning Post archives. The historical newspaper archive of Hong Kong based South China Morning Post will add compelling value for eight members of the JULAC (Joint University Libraries Advisory Committee) consortium. With s ... <<more>>


Full Automation News Report